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Thread: 44th PRESIDENT ELECTED BARACK OBAMA

  1. #196
    Elite Member *DIVA!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmmdee View Post
    Oh dear.
    Lawd, I second that...

    cmmdee, I find Obama cute now!


    I don''t know if she really fucked the board though. Maybe just put the tip in. -Mrs. Dark

  2. #197
    Elite Member cmmdee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSDiva View Post
    Lawd, I second that...

    cmmdee, I find Obama cute now!
    To your first comment:



    Sometimes I just can't type because well, you know. LOL.

    To your second comment, "NOW??" NOW???

    WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN???? My obsession first started with O's teeth, then moved to his brain, then to his speech.
    Today I was reading about how he will be given his first 'top secret briefing' and I was thinking to myself, fantasizing really, What I would give to be briefing him in that top secret way.
    Papi is sexy!
    I imagine he and Michelle have crazy secks and well, she's a lucky woman.

    Hahaha!

  3. #198
    Elite Member WesCAdle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingcap72 View Post
    No offense taken. This change hit me on two levels:

    1) Seeing Obama win the White House was a turning of the page in American history. From the slave ships, to the plantations, to Jim Crow, to the Civil Rights Movement, it seemed as if all was build up for last night. If Hillary put 18 million cracks in the glass ceiling, Obama shattered it completely. And his win showed people, of all races, that there really is no limitation to the goals you can reach for. Now Obama's win doesn't end racism in America, but it shows that America is taking a major step in the right direction. And the fact that over 60% of Obama supporters are white speaks volumes. And for black people Obama's win represents a sense of true acceptance as Americans.

    2) Obama's win signals the end of the Bush Error. America had become a different place under George Bush, and a not for the better. Things had become too divisive with both domestic and foreign policy. Obama's, I mean President Obama's, landslide victory was a rejection of the politics of the last 8 years. It really feels like a new day in America. Now that's not to say that Obama's going to wave a magic wand and all of the problems will vanish, but if he runs this country with half of the success that he ran his campaign then he's going to be a damn good president.

    Kingcap, well said and I totally agree with your sentiments.

    ArmyWifey? Is that you cupcake changing your name now that Bible Spice had to give the goods back (including boots - though some things have allegedly mysteriously disappeared)? J/K
    I have to disagree that a great deal has changed in all of America regarding racism even though slavery was eons (150 years) ago. The Civil Rights movement of the 60's proved that everyone was still not equal even if slavery had been outlawed. I can only hope that people continue to progress in their acceptance of others and let go of their fear of what is unknown to them. I have been to many countries and America is still one of the most racially divided in the world. Perhaps since other countries are closer to their neighbors and other cultures they have learned to be tolerant and respectful of other cultures, races, and creeds. Since the last great wave of immigration in the 20's, IMO many Americans have forgotten to be tolerant of others who are unlike themselves.
    as privileged as a whore...victims in demand for public show, swept out through the cracks beneath the door, holier than thou, how?

  4. #199
    Elite Member mrs.v's Avatar
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  5. #200
    Gold Member ArmyWifey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stylejunkiex View Post
    I agree and disagree in some respects. I know that we've come a very long way regarding civil rights--this election and its outcome is proof of that-- but we still have a long way to go. I think we were just at a standstill regarding racial relations within this country.. it's been stagnant for a while, IMO, and this election has put it back into peoples minds.. the fact that we need change and can't just stay in the same place, biding our time, saying "one day change might come along"... The opportunity for that change came along and I assume my pride and happiness stems from the fact that I feel like we all came together and answered the call for hope. I felt like I was in the minority for so long, being so apathetic about our government and disapproving of the administration we had for 8 long years, and this just made me feel like a part of something bigger.. It's incomparable, but I felt like we all united just like people did back in the 60s for a common cause, a common passion, all linked together by this one charismatic person representing change.

    On the other hand, this election has really brought out some latent racism and prejudices that would have otherwise stayed hidden in the small pockets of America in which their open expression is permissible. That was one side of America that I'm not proud of and I hope we can change that.. I'm hoping and praying that people will come around and realize that this whole thing is more than just Dems vs Reps... red vs blue.. it's about ushering in a new era of hope that so many of us, young and old alike, haven't felt in a long time.

    Well said. Unfortunately, like it or not, we all as a nation still have things we strongly disagree about, even this election. This matter is not as simple as some want to make it, and that is my personal problem with this election.

    I don't like that Obama himself won. I will admit that. I do not have anything against the guy personally, I just feel for me, he isn't the person with the ideals where I would like to see this country go as far as GOVERNMENT is concerned. I do appreciate the social attributes he has brought like many of us have been talking about. Barriers have been officially broken and that is progress, and to be celebrated.

    I have always had faith in my country and the people in it for the most part. It is government I feel has failed us. I just feel like this election has been made by some about things it should not be about, whether "history" has been made or not. I am not trying to take anything away from that, it is ours to be proud of, BUT at the end of the day our nation is in crisis, and that is what I really care about most.

    Overall, Dems, Reps, Black, White, it's all bullshit. The issues that really should be binding us are the issues we the people face everyday like terrorism, gas prices, the bail out. The things mentioned above have nothing to do with those issues other than when people make things like ideals, thinking, dems, reps, black white, part of an equation that really doesn't need it. Things are complicated for our nation as it is.

    Well I could go on forever so anyways...

    PS I appreciate this board to talk about these feelings, so thank-you. Even if you don't agree I still appreciate the opportunity to speak.
    Id rather be hated for who I am than loved for who Im not

  6. #201
    Elite Member Penny Lane's Avatar
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    Well I think to get to all those issues you mentioned we first need to have everyone on the same page. I agree that we live in a very divisive country.. blacks vs whites.. dems vs repubs.. rich vs poor.. and I think we've lost track of the fact that it doesn't have to be this way. I agree that this election is about so much more.. the issues are what matter.. but when you have people holding such an apathetic and negative view of our administration, issues DON'T get resolved. I think this hope and change thing has turned people off of Obama because they think that's all he's about, but IMO that's just the first step towards tackling all these issues. He recognizes that we all need to come together and voice our opinions, which he has promised to listen to, if we want these issues to be resolved. We weren't getting that kind of attention these past few years and that is why I feel like so many of us have gotten out there and made this happen.. it's important to have a President of such high character as Obama, but at the end of the day I have faith that he'll get to the core of our problems as a nation and really focus on making it fair for everyone, too.

  7. #202
    Gold Member ArmyWifey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stylejunkiex View Post
    Well I think to get to all those issues you mentioned we first need to have everyone on the same page. I agree that we live in a very divisive country.. blacks vs whites.. dems vs repubs.. rich vs poor.. and I think we've lost track of the fact that it doesn't have to be this way. I agree that this election is about so much more.. the issues are what matter.. but when you have people holding such an apathetic and negative view of our administration, issues DON'T get resolved. I think this hope and change thing has turned people off of Obama because they think that's all he's about, but IMO that's just the first step towards tackling all these issues. He recognizes that we all need to come together and voice our opinions, which he has promised to listen to, if we want these issues to be resolved. We weren't getting that kind of attention these past few years and that is why I feel like so many of us have gotten out there and made this happen.. it's important to have a President of such high character as Obama, but at the end of the day I have faith that he'll get to the core of our problems as a nation and really focus on making it fair for everyone, too.

    I'd raise a glass to that,
    Id rather be hated for who I am than loved for who Im not

  8. #203
    Eli
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    McCain was just too old. He was a cancer survivor, he wife was mega-bitch and they seemed super excited to have sons in a deadly war. If McCain had died in the next 8 or 4 years, Palin would have taken over and she would have done a troublesome job of ruining the development of tolerance we're slowly managing to build in regards to a LOT of touchy subjects for some. In her world mothers are the priority of the world, good Christian/Catholic mothers, and all the rest are just some weird people she'd have to deal with out of necessity.
    Whereas Obama, lovely guy who is polite and (what I got from his success speech last night) very level headed at the same time. I say 'yes!' to a good future for America. No more monkey man telling us to play war with bigger army toys.

  9. #204
    Gold Member ymeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArmyWifey View Post

    Overall, Dems, Reps, Black, White, it's all bullshit. The issues that really should be binding us are the issues we the people face everyday like terrorism, gas prices, the bail out. The things mentioned above have nothing to do with those issues other than when people make things like ideals, thinking, dems, reps, black white, part of an equation that really doesn't need it. Things are complicated for our nation as it is.
    that is not an accident. Machiavellian tactics dictate that the only way to have a democracy in which people powerful enough to destroy it don't is to keep them getting richer and the only way to do that is to divide the populace on fake issues so they won't notice that the people behind the curtain are rolling in it.

  10. #205
    Elite Member january's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArmyWifey View Post
    Well said. Unfortunately, like it or not, we all as a nation still have things we strongly disagree about, even this election. This matter is not as simple as some want to make it, and that is my personal problem with this election.

    I don't like that Obama himself won. I will admit that. I do not have anything against the guy personally, I just feel for me, he isn't the person with the ideals where I would like to see this country go as far as GOVERNMENT is concerned. I do appreciate the social attributes he has brought like many of us have been talking about. Barriers have been officially broken and that is progress, and to be celebrated.

    I have always had faith in my country and the people in it for the most part. It is government I feel has failed us. I just feel like this election has been made by some about things it should not be about, whether "history" has been made or not. I am not trying to take anything away from that, it is ours to be proud of, BUT at the end of the day our nation is in crisis, and that is what I really care about most.

    Overall, Dems, Reps, Black, White, it's all bullshit. The issues that really should be binding us are the issues we the people face everyday like terrorism, gas prices, the bail out. The things mentioned above have nothing to do with those issues other than when people make things like ideals, thinking, dems, reps, black white, part of an equation that really doesn't need it. Things are complicated for our nation as it is.

    Well I could go on forever so anyways...

    PS I appreciate this board to talk about these feelings, so thank-you. Even if you don't agree I still appreciate the opportunity to speak.
    I can respect your view, and the fact that you didn't vote for him. Thats what democracy is about, after all. I am extremely excited what this election means in social progress; however, I think its misleading to assume that he was elected due to the fact he was a black man (not saying thats what you specifically are saying, but in general). I would have voted for Obama if he was black, white, red, purple...he inspired me for the first time, and I haven't felt that way in ages. CNN exit polls stated that race didn't even play a factor in this race even though it was played up in the media for months beforehand. In fact, there wasn't a significant boost in African-American numbers, and like I said before, they almost always vote Democrat anyway. Instead, I think he appealed more to the younger voters and the Independents. SO YES YES YES for social progress, and an even bigger YES to having a President that I personally have faith in. And I do feel like he's going to put us on the right track, I appreciate his policies and I agree with his political platforms. To me, he's much more than just a great orator. Plus, I am ecstatic that overnight our foreign relations have changed, and we are viewed in a more positive light. Our democracy is being hailed all over the world right now. I know this because I used to live in the Middle East, and my friends who are there are overjoyed at this election, and it redeems us somewhat for our past mistakes. It really is a fairy tale story in that capacity.

    NYCgirly, I do personally feel that Palin put the nail in the coffin for McCain. I am an Independent female, and he LOST me at that pick. Yes, I was already leaning Obama, but I was open to McCain. After that pick, nope, I shut down. And it wasn't just me, he alienated all kinds of females and Independents, the TWO GROUPS he wanted to appease with the pick. It was an epic fail. Obama won both of those groups. He couldn't have picked someone farther to the right. And yes, it energized the base, but come on! Those people would have never voted Obama anyway, he had their reluctant votes already. He did nothing but lose votes with her, period. And yes, I think she was very, very ambitious and I think she went over his head many of times. Thats why they described her as "going rogue". Maybe she just didn't know how to play the game, but yes, I do think he would have run a classier race without him. It was her that ignored the racist chants and threats at her rallies and whipped the crowds into a frenzy. She had a social obligation to say something when they said the n-word and "kill him" and "terrorist", but her lips were shut. Instead, she just pounded more on the message - he's not one of us, he pals around with terrorists, he's not part of the "real" America. I think she ignored every message from his camp and just went her own way, you could tell how exasperated they were with her. I could tell as soon as their camp pulled out of Michigan and she went public saying they shouldn't have - she was running for HERSELF, not McCain. She let it get the best of her. I do think if she wasn't there, McCain wouldn't have let the campaign get drug so far into the mud. He had no control over her whatsoever. I think once she started going rogue, his advisers were telling him to try to catch up so they didn't seem like they were on totally different pages.
    Women ain't gonna let a thing like sense fuck up their argument. - Chris Rock

  11. #206
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    great article that i think sums things up rather nicely, though it does get a little sappy at the end.

    Taking our country back

    Obama's victory was a triumph not just for Democrats but for the American spirit and the world. By Gary Kamiya
    Nov. 05, 2008 |
    Today the embattled American people stood, and fired a shot heard 'round the world.

    Only rarely does one know that one is experiencing history while it happens. Barack Obama's victory is one of those occasions. This amazing day marks a decisive change, not just in America's politics but in its soul. It announces the arrival of a new America, of a multitudinous, multihued people whose time has come and who have demanded a politics worthy of them. Their voice echoes across the land from Stone Mountain to Seattle, and its message rings out loud and clear: We have taken our country back.

    We have taken it back from the mean-spirited demagogues who were willing to tear the American people apart to stay in power.

    We have taken it back from the apostles of selfishness who pretend naked greed is noble individualism.

    We have taken it back from the deluded hawks who cavalierly sent our youth off to die in a war that should never have been fought.

    We have taken it back from the incompetent officials who lived up to their antigovernment credo by bungling everything they touched.

    We have taken it back from the reactionaries whose intolerance, xenophobia and religious zealotry have been encouraged by a distorted Republican Party for far too long.

    Some will say that this election didn't prove that much. They will argue that considering Bush's unpopularity, the war and the financial crisis, this race should never have been even competitive. They will say the race was tied in September and only an inept McCain campaign and the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression tilted it toward Obama. They will say that America is still a center-right country.

    But those arguments are like dead trees standing in the path of a spring-snow torrent. A great change has come upon America.

    Watching Obama speak after his victory, I was reminded again of the subtle and profound depths of this man. It was a subdued speech, on the surface almost disappointing, but its eloquent restraint spoke volumes about not just Obama's character but what we could call, harking back to another age, his taste. He chose not to mount the messianic pulpit, knowing that if he did he would alienate many Americans. Because of his complex and hard-earned comfort with his own racial identity, he is a self-reflective man, a man of many parts.

    We have seen his facets. Obama can parry and thrust with Hillary Clinton. He can be hip with Jon Stewart. He can speak eloquently of race, as he did in his victory speech, without foregrounding his own race. He can reach out to those who didn't vote for him, and his native sensitivity makes his words believable. His rhetoric is soaring but never self-aggrandizing: He is too confident in his own identity to need the fix of adulation. A leader with these qualities, a black man whose racial consciousness is so evolved as to be unreadable, has the ability to take America places it has never been before.

    The election of Obama marks a change in what it means to be an American. It is a change that is as true to the essence of conservatism as it is to liberalism, for it has its roots in a generous vision of civic life that both share. And all Americans will benefit from it.

    The Obama triumph means the Reagan revolution is over. The antigovernment, antitax, trickle-down, every-man-for-himself ethos collapsed with a whimper during the catastrophic presidency of George W. Bush, and Obama's election put it out of its misery. By electing Obama, the American people have emphatically rejected the selfishness, masquerading as freedom and rugged individualism, that has been the calling card of the American right wing since Barry Goldwater. In its place, they are calling not just for a new and expanded vision of government's role in American life but for a new vision of American society.


    it's long, rest of the article here: link
    I'm open to everything. When you start to criticise the times you live in, your time is over. - Karl Lagerfeld

  12. #207
    Elite Member L1049's Avatar
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    ArmyWife, at least you're not going cupcake on us. See cupcake, if a non-Obama supporter actually posts something worth reading and has valid points, they won't be ripped apart.

    Sorry to bring that up, but I just found it worth pointing out.

  13. #208
    Elite Member LynnieD's Avatar
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    Awesome Sputnik. Truly awesome!!

  14. #209
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    I'm not American but I am really happy for you guys. I am really pleased that Obama is in!!!

  15. #210
    Elite Member LynnieD's Avatar
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    Thx Voodoo!! Celebrate with us!!

    DRINKS ON ME!!

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