View Poll Results: When push comes to shove will Ivanka stand with her husband or dad?

Voters
51. You may not vote on this poll
  • Daddy dearest

    37 72.55%
  • Weasel boy

    14 27.45%
Page 83 of 115 FirstFirst ... 337379808182838485868793 ... LastLast
Results 1,231 to 1,245 of 1722
Like Tree4352Likes

Thread: Tremendous people. All the best people. The general politics thread.

  1. #1231
    Elite Member ShimmeringGlow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    7,953

    Default

    Spoke too soon....


    Per pool, Trump has arrived at Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, VA.

    This is Trump's 143rd day at a Trump property as president and his 106th day at a Trump golf club as president.
    Brookie likes this.

  2. #1232
    Elite Member ShimmeringGlow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    7,953

    Default

    Owen Wynne-Griffith@OwenWG1976

    Kensington Wine Rooms in London commemorating #TrumpRussia treason with a classy blue plaque






  3. #1233
    Elite Member Kittylady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Somewhere been 'General Confusion' and 'Total WTF?'
    Posts
    21,035

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MohandasKGanja View Post
    Will his followers follow him there if he accuses a state office of being part of the Deep State?
    His followers would follow him into the bowels of hell, and he's certainly doing his best to get them there.
    I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me. Hunter S Thompson

    How big would a T-Rex wang be?! - Karistiona


  4. #1234
    Elite Member ShimmeringGlow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    7,953

    Default

    A get rich scheme gone horribly wrong....how much has the government paid him...


    TRUMP's campaign paid his businesses $150k in the 1st quarter, including $68k to @TrumpDC & $58k for rent, according to newly filed @FEC reports. https://t.co/wJQS1rn3nE https://t.co/uuLCAo6yPj

  5. #1235
    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    22,766

    Default

    Source: Raw Story

    Ex-White House ethics attorney explains how Trump’s ‘stupid’ call to attorney Cohen could blow up in president’s face


    Attorney Richard Painter -- CNN screenshot







    Appearing early Saturday morning on CNN’s New Day, former chief White House ethics lawyer Richard Painter said President Donald Trump may have put himself in more legal peril by calling his personal attorney, Michael Cohen, to chat after the attorney’s home and office was raided by the FBI.


    Speaking with CNN host Victor Blackwell, Richard Painter said it made no sense for Trump to contact Cohen — and that the FBI could compel Cohen to tell them what was said.

    “A source tells CNN that President Trump called Micheal Cohen just to check in,” Blackwell explained. “We know that he’s been under investigation for months and both men are involved in investigations. Clearly this is an ill-advised call. what are the potential problems about the phone call?”


    “Well, unless the president was calling Michael Cohen for purposes of seeking legal advice, the call is not privileged meaning the FBI, the prosecutors could ask Michael Cohen about that call,” Painter explained. “They could get evidence from Michael Cohen about what happened on that call and could ask President Trump. I have no idea why anyone in their right mind would call up a lawyer to seek legal advice from a lawyer days after the FBI raided the lawyer’s office.”


    “It’s amazing that President Trump didn’t have the good judgment to let it alone, to have nothing to do with Michael Cohen until this is sorted out,” he added. “It doesn’t matter this is not about legal advice. This is an old friend calling to say things will get better? Well, he can do that, but the FBI may find out what was said in that call. Michael Cohen could cut a plea deal with the prosecutors and tell them what happened.”


    “The point is, it’s not a privileged call when the president just is calling to say, ‘well, I’m sorry the FBI raided your office, and I’ll provide bail money or a pardon,” Painter elaborated. “I have no idea why he made the call. It’s stupid.”



    Watch the video below via CNN:


    Source: The Atlantic



    Unfit to Command

    With the president in an agitated state, preoccupied with his legal troubles, this is no time for war.



    The weekend news from Washington featured two story lines: the U.S.-led coalition missile strikes against Syrian government forces, and President Trump’s most extreme Twitter meltdown to date. The question for all the world to worry over: How closely are these two story lines interconnected?

    How and to what extent is the president’s increasingly extreme mental state obtruding on the national security of the United States?


    The most important business of the day on Friday, April 13, was to sign off on that night’s planned missile strike against government forces in Syria.

    The decision was a heavy one, involving risks of conflict with Russia and Iran. It also sharply reversed Trump’s public statements only nine days before that the U.S. would be ending its Syria role soon.


    And yet that’s not where Trump’s brain was. Starting at 8 am that day and continuing into the afternoon, the president erupted in a sequence of rage tweets against former FBI director James Corey, demanding that he be prosecuted, calling him as a “slime ball,” and congratulating himself for firing Comey.


    Yet when the president stepped before the TV cameras at 8 p.m. to announce the strikes, most pundits and most politicians temporarily disregarded that same-day evidence of the president’s agitated mental state. The impulse to rally around the flag seized American elites, even many Trump critics, who saluted the president’s leadership. The strong dormant desire to discover some normality in this most abnormal administration reasserted itself.

    As happened the last time he launched missiles into Syria, almost exactly a year before, Trump went to bed that night to praise that he had proven himself presidential.


    Whatever satisfaction he got from that praise quickly faded. On Sunday morning, Trump apparently awoke again in a state of crazed rage. He was angry that his Saturday morning use of the phrase “mission accomplished” had raised eyebrows. He tweeted an angry insistence that his use was not a mistake. It was smart! He would do it again! He resumed blasting at Comey from 7:42 onward, coming to rest only at 10:44 with a message of self-reassurance about the great job he was doing and how popular he was.


    "Just hit 50% in the Rasmussen Poll, much higher than President Obama at same point. With all of the phony stories and Fake News, it’s hard to believe! Thank you America, we are doing Great Things.”


    So many people have so much difficulty joining their awareness of the president’s instability to their commentary on U.S. military actions. They mentally update the famous line of Donald Rumsfeld’s: “You don’t go to war with the commander-in-chief you want. You go to war with the commander-in-chief you have.” Yet if any other aspect of U.S. military power were in the same damaged condition as the supreme executive authority, responsible people would pause at going to war at all. If the aircraft were inoperable, the warships unseaworthy, or the troops disaffected—wise decision-makers would refrain from deploying them. All those instruments are in good condition, fortunately. But the person in charge is not. His severe personal legal jeopardy dominates his thoughts and deranges his behavior. That’s a strategic fact at least as real and important as the need to uphold the taboo against chemical weapons.


    Even if he’s offering to take you to church, you don’t get into a car with a drunken driver. That same caution should operate with Trump, even if you might otherwise approve any particular decision that emerges from his administration.


    This president is not in command of himself. He’s obsessed with his own problems. He seethes with rage and resentment for all the world to view—and those emotions are visibly distorting his decision-making. The consolation we’re offered for this broken presidency is that the president is not in fact truly in charge of it. Decisions about war and peace are not really being made by Trump, but by more judicious and responsible people behind the scenes. Even if that were true, it’s not exactly cheering: The safety of the United States and the peace of the world is being protected by subverting the American constitutional scheme. But worse, it’s not exactly true. The second year Trump foreign-policy team is being restaffed in ways that make it even less judicious and responsible than the year one team. And it is Trump who is responsible for that restaffing.


    The Syria operation was mostly a stunt: It sends a message of disapproval without altering the administration’s inward acceptance of Assad’s victory in the Syrian Civil War. Trump even tweeted notice of the missile strike 60 hours in advance, extending the Russians and Syrians time to ready themselves. The risk that this strike could escalate into something more serious seems vanishingly small.


    But other and larger military decisions loom ahead: Iran, Korea, Afghanistan, and conceivably even confrontations with China. The person nominally in charge is in no psychic state for his office. His condition is deteriorating—and with that personal deterioration, there also deteriorates America’s security and standing in the world.
    ShimmeringGlow and Brookie like this.
    Warren Beatty: actor, director, writer, producer.

    ***** celeb

  6. #1236
    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    22,766

    Default

    Sorry, wouldn't let me edit. Follow the link in the 2nd tweet for the document.
    https://assets.documentcloud.org/doc...RO-Request.pdf
    Brookie likes this.
    Warren Beatty: actor, director, writer, producer.

    ***** celeb

  7. #1237
    Elite Member ShimmeringGlow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    7,953

    Default

    This article is probably on here somewhere, but in light of talk about Trump firing Rosenstein and Mueller, let's take another look at Mueller’s possible plan of action.

    An excerpt...

    But in practice, state rules can expand double jeopardy protections and limit prosecutions. In fact, New York is such a state. New York is the key state for Mueller because New York has jurisdiction over many alleged or potentially uncovered Trump–Russia crimes (conspiracy to hack/soliciting stolen goods/money laundering, etc.), and New York state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman and New York district attorneys are not politically constrained from pursuing charges.

    New York’s Criminal Procedure Law 40.20 states, “A person may not be twice prosecuted for the same offense.” The issue is that New York defines “prosecution” broadly. Section 40.30 continues:

    Except as otherwise provided in this section, a person “is prosecuted” for an offense, within the meaning of section 40.20, when he is charged therewith by an accusatory instrument filed in a court of this state or of any jurisdiction within the United States, and when the action either: (a) Terminates in a conviction upon a plea of guilty; or
    (b) Proceeds to the trial stage and a jury has been impaneled and sworn or, in the case of a trial by the court without a jury, a witness is sworn.

    The New York statute does not allow a state prosecution to follow a federal prosecution (“a court of any jurisdiction within the United States”) for the same basic facts. The bottom line: If Mueller starts a trial on all of the potential charges, and then Trump pardons Manafort, Mueller will not be able to hand off the case to state prosecutors. And thus he would have lost leverage at the time of the indictment if he seemed headed toward losing the state prosecution as a backup.

    Instead, Mueller wisely brought one set of charges (mostly financial crimes that preceded the campaign), and he is saving other charges that New York could also bring (tax fraud, soliciting stolen goods, soliciting/conspiring to hack computers). Mueller also knew that his indictment document on Monday would include a devastating amount of detail on paper without relying on any witnesses to testify, showing Mueller had the goods on a slam-dunk federal money laundering case. Then he dropped the hammer with the Papadopoulos plea agreement, showing Manafort and Gates that he has the goods on far more charges, both in federal and state court.

    Robert Mueller?s Brilliant Strategy for Outmaneuvering Trump Pardons
    Brookie likes this.

  8. #1238
    Elite Member ShimmeringGlow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    7,953

    Default

    A targot card reader on Lipstick Alley posted last year a blond woman was going to bring about Trump’s downfall. Hahaha...the payment to Stormy Daniels probably triggered the criminal investigation into Michael Cohen.


    New, major Michael Cohen investigation news:
    -His bank flagged wires to LLC as suspicious, sparking criminal investigation
    -His loan application may have misstated purpose of funds
    -Elliott Broidy wired same LLC, then wired Cohen after LLC exposed https://t.co/eiG3k6wyy1
    Brookie likes this.

  9. #1239
    Elite Member Tiny Pixie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Stockholm
    Posts
    5,012

    Default

    The more there is, the more I think he's just gonna get away with it.
    Because if nothing has happened yet despite all that shit storm(i), I dont know what more is needed. And sadly that's the thing with those people who think so highly of themselves that they're never gonna believe they made mistakes, they're always gonna think that whatever they do is fantastic, well those people dont ask for permission, they just do things, they dont apologise, they play the victims, and for some fucked up reason they get away with everything.

    In my previous school we used to nickname our headmaster Trump Jr, because he was exactly the same. It was creepy. Same personality, same tendency to blame others, throw tantrums about witch hunts, use "whataboutism" to not answer questions, of course never acknowledging he was a fucking incompetent idiot, and still, some competent teachers ended up being fired, or resigning, and he's still running that school, and he still has powerful associates that will guarantee him a nice golden seat in an embassy when he's done his years in the education system.

    I was one of the teachers who got fired, and seriously I had hope that something would happen (unions were looking into this) but no. They ended up telling me and those who left that it was probably better for us, and those who stay that they'd have to endure. That whole experience got me really bitter I guess, and when I look at that Trump idiot, I just get the feeling that the same thing will happen.
    He will do his mandate, retire having been convinced he did a FANTASTIC job and nothing will happen to smack his stupid smirk off his stupid face.


    I want to be proven wrong though
    ShimmeringGlow and Brookie like this.
    Fluctuat nec mergitur
    Paris, Nov 13th


  10. #1240
    Elite Member ShimmeringGlow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    7,953

    Default

    Paul Ryan won't bring to a vote a bill to protect Mueller. Why? The Republicans are protecting a clearly unfit man and it's not clear why. What does Trump and the Russians have on the GOP leadership? Trump isn't going anywhere soon.

    His ignorance is frightening. Comey will go down in history as the man who helped this vile creature move into the WH.

    "Amusing moment at the famous WH dinner as Trump shows off the fancy place cards to Comey:

    “He held his up and said, ‘They write these by hand.’
    “And I said, ‘A calligrapher?’
    “And he kind of gave me this look and he said, ‘They write them by hand.’
    “I let it go.”

  11. #1241
    Elite Member Tiny Pixie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Stockholm
    Posts
    5,012

    Default

    Hey, you can't expect him to know a 4-syllables word. That's at least two too many
    twitchy2.0, Brookie and Kittylady like this.
    Fluctuat nec mergitur
    Paris, Nov 13th


  12. #1242
    Elite Member ShimmeringGlow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    7,953

    Default

    Trump’s U.S. businesses have received at least $15,100,000 in revenue from political groups and federal agencies since 2015, according to a new report obtained by McClatchy. https://t.co/7D2quKBUFY

  13. #1243
    Elite Member greysfang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Burning Down Your Windmill
    Posts
    56,180

    Default

    You're being way too impatient. Lawsuits take time, sometimes years. Its often the same with criminal investigations, they have to have all their i's dotted and t's crossed so their cases are airtight. Particularly when you're dealing with the rich who can and will get the best lawyers possible to defend themselves.
    FUCK YOU AND GIVE ME MY GODDAMN VENTI TWO PUMP LIGHT WHIP MOCHA YOU COCKSUCKING WHORE BEFORE I PUNCH YOU IN THE MOUTH. I just get unpleasant in my car. - Deej

    http://www.gossiprocks.com/forum/signaturepics/sigpic4098_9.gif Healthy is merely the slowest possible rate at which one can die.

  14. #1244
    Elite Member ShimmeringGlow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    7,953

    Default

    Speaking of lawyers...

    UNDER SIEGE, MICHAEL COHEN IS VACILLATING BETWEEN A NEW LEVEL OF EXASPERATION AND TRUMPIAN BUSINESS-AS-USUAL

    Cohen has been dismayed by the silence from Trump's inner-circle in Washington. One person familiar with his thinking said that he’s gotten messages from thousands of people since last Monday, but “it’s been a ghost town from D.C.”—other than from the president.

    BY



    APRIL 15, 2018 11:22 PM




    Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's personal attorney, chats with friends near the Loews Regency hotel on Park Ave on Friday.
    By Yana Paskova/Getty Images.

    The most vexing week of Michael Cohen’s career ended as bizarrely as it began. On Monday, a team of federal agents had obtained search warrants for Cohen’s home and office, following a referral from Special Counsel Robert Mueller’soffice, as part of the U.S. attorney’s office’s months-long criminal conduct investigation. A dozen F.B.I. agents subsequently raided Cohen’s hotel room at The Regency—his apartment is undergoing construction—where they literally snatched his cell phone from his hand. Simultaneously, approximately two dozen other agents took business records, documents, computers, and electronic devices from his law office and apartment, seizing two cellphones, a tablet, a laptop and safe deposit box. They walked away with documents dating back years, potentially including those related to payoffs made to women alleging that they had affairs with Cohen’s longtime client, Donald Trump, during his presidential campaign. Investigators reportedly sought files related to the adult film star Stephanie Clifford, whom Cohen paid $130,000 to suppress an alleged sexual encounter with the president. (The president has denied the relationship.).

    Cohen’s lawyer has called the raid “completely inappropriate and unnecessary”—an overreach beyond the law. Cohen, however, seemed notably demure. On Tuesday evening, a throng of photographers waited for him outside La Goulue, the newly re-opened old-timey French staple on East 63rd Street. The photographers trailed him as he strolled the three-or-so blocks back to the Regency, tripping over one another and spilling into the street. “I don’t want anyone to fall and hurt yourself,” Cohen said. “I’m not running anywhere. If you want me to stop so you guys can get in position and get your shot, I’ll stop.” So he did. He counted to three—“1 … 2 … 3 ...” so that they could take their photos before he resumed walking.

    The next day, Cohen went to lunch at Fred’s, the watering hole atop Barney’s, where one diner told me several people approached his table to check in on him. The following night, he had dinner at Le Bilboquet, where another diner told me he mostly typed away on his phone and quietly sipped his drink. Cohen stopped at tables and waved to patrons on his way out—where, again, photographers awaited. This time, though, it seemed that fellow diners were less cordial. “He was definitely trying to work the room, but it didn’t work back.” Cohen eventually found a more hospitable crowd on Friday afternoon outside the Regency, holding a cigar with a quorum of coiffed well-wishers who looked perfectly at home as extras in this plot.


    Further downtown, however, Judge Kimba Wood was asking Cohen’s attorney, Todd Harrison, the whereabouts of his client. Wood, the Senior United States District Judge for Manhattan’s Southern District, was herself no stranger to the harsh glare of the media. In 1993, her chances of an appointment as U.S. Attorney General were famously dashed by reports that she had hired an undocumented worker to look after her child. In front of a rollicking court room in lower Manhattan, which included three rows of press personnel—so crowded, in fact, that folding chairs were brought in—Wood adjourned a hearing over whether she would grant the temporary restraining order (T.R.O.) that Cohen’s legal team had asked for that, for now, would effectively block prosecutors from reading the seized files. Harrison argued that the thousands of documents were protected by attorney-client privilege, and that Cohen or an independent lawyer should be allowed to review them first, rather than a so-called “filter team” of impartial government prosecutors. Judge Wood had asked Harrison to provide her with a list of Cohen’s clients to help substantiate the claims made in his request, but Harrison could not offer an accurate estimate and asked for more time. Prosecutors, meanwhile, argued that their investigation focused on his business dealings, not his legal work, and that Cohen, who is often referred to a Trump's “fixer,” was “performing little to no legal work,” and had exchanged zero e-mails with his famous client.

    Meanwhile, Joanna Hendon, a lawyer hired by Trump two days earlier, addressed the court on her new client’s behalf. She asked Judge Wood for more time, too, arguing that she needed to get up to speed. “Those searches have been executed, and the evidence is locked down,” Hendon, said in court. “I’m not trying to delay,” she continued, “I’m just trying to ensure that it’s done scrupulously.” Her client, who she punctiliously noted was the President of the United States, had an acute interest in these proceedings.

    “Ultimately,” she said, “this is of most concern to him.” As the session adjourned, Judge Wood granted Harrison until Monday to come up with a client list and ordered him to appear alongside Cohen for another hearing on Monday.

    Cohen’s week ahead may simply prove more agonizing. The raids on his residences and office have since become the biggest story in the media—outshining, somehow, the administration’s Syrian air strike on Friday night, and James Comey’s media tour. Trump’s own interest in the affair escalated throughout the week, in typically Chernobylesque fashion. On Monday afternoon, directly following news of the raids, Trump called it a “disgraceful situation” during a meeting with military commanders ostensibly about how to handle the Syria quagmire. By Friday, The New York Times reported that Trump had called Cohen to check in. That evening, McClatchy issued a report suggesting that Mueller had evidence that Cohen had been in Prague in the summer of 2016, as noted in the unverified Steele Dossier. (Cohen subsequently denied this.) The Timesalso reported that Trump now feared the Cohen Inquiry as a greater threat than the Mueller probe, itself.

    As much as the raid has spooked President Trump, and in contrast to the breezy, cigar-smoking images portrayed, it has also weighed heavily on Cohen. In the days since the raid, according to two people familiar with his thinking, Cohen has grappled with the seriousness of his legal situation, and the impact it has had on his family, and the fallout that may follow in the weeks, months, and perhaps years to come. These people explained that Cohen feels as though he is a means to an end—as “collateral damage,” and a “disposable” element being used to get to his old boss.

    Cohen, according to these people, has vacillated between this new level of exasperation and his typical Trumpian chest beating manner. He has suggested to people close to him that perhaps he should act as his own attorney, because he may be the most apt person to defend himself. He has expressed anger at the lack of outrage over the fact that his legal office and private residences were searched when he says he was willing to cooperate with any subpoenas. “Where is the A.C.L.U?” he has said; at times, he has jokingly asked whether there is going to be a “Million Michael March”—a reference to the renowned 1995 African-American display of unity—to retrieve his documents. Cohen, according to these people, has also been dismayed by the silence from Trump’s inner-circle in Washington, many of whom he expected would have his back. One person familiar with his thinking said that he’s gotten messages from thousands of people since last Monday, but “it’s been a ghost town from D.C.,” other than from the president.

    Whatever relative calm Cohen was hanging onto at Fred’s or outside the Regency will be harder to muster come Monday afternoon. Cohen is due to present the court with a client list in order for Judge Wood to determine whether she will grant him the temporary restraining order. He will also face what seems like a deliberate test of his will in the form of Stormy Daniels, who is expected to be in attendance. On Sunday, her attorney, Michael Avenatti said on CNN that he got “comfortable with the security plan last night for my client” and that she plans to attend the hearing. “I think Monday afternoon could prove to be very interesting,” he said. (On Friday, the three rows of press erupted into whispers when Avenatti walked into court. “What is he doing here?” one reporter asked. “How many times is he going to be on T.V. after this one?” another joked. Avenatti addressed the court twice—first, asking to be heard because the information impacted his client, and second, to offer his insight on a matter prosecutors and Cohen’s attorneys were debating. He gave a statement to T.V. cameras outside afterward.)

    Withstanding the hearing is only the beginning of what could be an ugly legal situation for Cohen. No charges have been filed against him, but prosecutors asserted that he is under criminal investigation. Cohen, who professes a devout fealty to his boss, has spent more than a decade working alongside the Trumps, devoting his professional life to protecting them. He may now be in a position where he could be forced to choose between continuing that line of defense, or putting himself and his own family first. In my interviews with Cohen, he has always stated plainly, repeatedly, and in a Godfather-esque lingua franca, how unfailingly loyal he is to the president and to the Trump family. Over the summer, Cohen told me that he would take a bullet for Trump. In February, as the Stormy Daniels controversy heated up, he told me that he would do it again today for Trump and again for him tomorrow. “No question,” he said. Last month, he told me that it was his job to protect his client—his friend—and the Trump family.



    https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2018...-michael-cohen


  15. #1245
    Elite Member louiswinthorpe111's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Middle America
    Posts
    13,804

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ShimmeringGlow View Post
    Paul Ryan won't bring to a vote a bill to protect Mueller. Why? The Republicans are protecting a clearly unfit man and it's not clear why. What does Trump and the Russians have on the GOP leadership? Trump isn't going anywhere soon.

    His ignorance is frightening. Comey will go down in history as the man who helped this vile creature move into the WH.

    "Amusing moment at the famous WH dinner as Trump shows off the fancy place cards to Comey:

    “He held his up and said, ‘They write these by hand.’
    “And I said, ‘A calligrapher?’
    “And he kind of gave me this look and he said, ‘They write them by hand.’
    “I let it go.”
    Susan Collins said on one of the Sunday morning shows yesterday that putting forth a bill is a waste of time because trump isn’t going to sign it anyway. She also said that they absolutely will not stand for the firing of mueller.

    I think the comey interview was too short. Should have been 2 hours. And there was nothing stated that we didn’t know already.
    Brookie likes this.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Inbred Rich People: The Royalty Thread Part 2
    By twitchy2.0 in forum Latest Gossip
    Replies: 3351
    Last Post: September 23rd, 2019, 12:14 PM
  2. Who Are The Actual 'Crazy' People In American Politics?
    By witchcurlgirl in forum U.S. Politics and Issues
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: March 5th, 2010, 01:38 AM
  3. Questions about politics in general
    By travelbug in forum U.S. Politics and Issues
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: September 11th, 2008, 02:01 PM
  4. I'm in ur (inspired by Grimm's cat thread) people version
    By moomies in forum Laughs and Oddities
    Replies: 60
    Last Post: July 21st, 2007, 01:10 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •