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Thread: More open racism in Trump's America

  1. #376
    Elite Member Trixie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HWBL View Post
    The thing that scares me, aside from the police brutality and looting, is that so many people are now united in protests outside while there is still a pandemic going on. We've joked about the "it's my right to go to the beach" idiots, saying that it would make the elections for anti-Trumpers easier since it would cost him a lot of votes, but now the anti-racism protests are bringing out people in large groups as well, from the other side....... These are such fucked up times and the one who is supposed to calm things down and try to unite the nation is only pouring oil on the fire.
    Well, I'm not sure how many are from the "other side" but the WH is sure pushing that view. And, covid who? It just got kicked out of the news cycle in a flash like it doesn't exist. Even my local paper which has had covid coverage on the front page for months has bumped it in lieu of protest news. I hate to be a conspiracy theorist, but...
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  2. #377
    Elite Member Nevan's Avatar
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    I think one of the biggest problems here is that the public has had it with police brutality ... yet the police are the ones that have to deal with the crowd. It's like pouring gasoline on the fire.

    I saw one video that scared the shit out of me ... protesters were breaking windows of regular cars on the roads trying to get into them. I can't even imagine how you deal with that. Do you let them pull you out of your car or do you drive into them to get them to stop? The mentality of all of this is scary and disturbing.

    Trixie, I totally agree with you. I think this was grabbed onto to change the news cycle.
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  3. #378
    Elite Member ShimmeringGlow's Avatar
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    Trump and advisers calculated that he shouldn’t speak to the nation because he had nothing to say, no tangible policy or action to announce, nor did he feel an urgent motivation to try to bring people together. So he let his tweets speak for themselves.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/PhilipRucker/status/1267230985344729088

  4. #379
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    Oh, what a waste of flesh he is.
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  5. #380
    Elite Member ShimmeringGlow's Avatar
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    UN High Commissioner for Human Rights: “This is the latest in a long line of killings of unarmed African Americans by US police officers and members of the public. The US authorities must take serious action to stop such killings and to ensure justice is done when they do occur."

    UN High Commissioner for Human Rights: "Police officers who resort to excessive use of force should be charged and convicted... The role that entrenched and pervasive racial discrimination plays in such deaths must also be fully examined, properly recognized and dealt with."

    https://mobile.twitter.com/ryanstruyk/status/1267242882336993280

  6. #381
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Santa Cruz taking a knee in memory of George Floyd.
    This appears to be the exception though.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/SantaCruz...41397497221120

    Camden NJ



    Flint


    https://www.forbes.com/sites/lisette...w#5c5dba785edb
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  7. #382
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    ^^^ thank you.

    there are plenty of places with peaceful demonstrations. i wish those would get more press.
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  8. #383
    Elite Member Mivvi21's Avatar
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    More cops need to stand in solidarity with the people they are supposed to serve and protect. Cops have zero positive interaction with the public at all anymore. The only relationship they have is a negative one, and that is definitely part of the problem. Harsher screening and mental testing, as well as extensive background checks have to be implemented to become a police officer. It is far too easy to carry a badge, and so many jackbooted Nazi's are infiltrating the police force it is fucking terrifying.
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  9. #384
    Elite Member Nevan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShimmeringGlow View Post
    UN High Commissioner for Human Rights: “This is the latest in a long line of killings of unarmed African Americans by US police officers and members of the public. The US authorities must take serious action to stop such killings and to ensure justice is done when they do occur."

    UN High Commissioner for Human Rights: "Police officers who resort to excessive use of force should be charged and convicted... The role that entrenched and pervasive racial discrimination plays in such deaths must also be fully examined, properly recognized and dealt with."

    https://mobile.twitter.com/ryanstruyk/status/1267242882336993280
    Well, I guess we'll be quitting the UN next. Jfc.
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  10. #385
    Elite Member Waterslide's Avatar
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    Meanwhile, in Chicago, The Latin Kings are stopping looters, which isn't terribly surprising since they started out as a group of guys protecting their communities since the police wouldn't have anything to do with them.

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  11. #386
    Elite Member Nevan's Avatar
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    I read a story with a video attached where some white jackass took out his hunting bow and tried to shoot into the crowd. The crowd just devoured him, it was kind of amazing. Then they pulverized his car and set it on fire while the police took the hunting jackass into custody. Who the fuck brings a hunting bow to a protest? The video I watched had the hunting jackass screaming at people around him but this shows the takedown.

    https://youtu.be/yImHy8-pkns

    ** I do not think these rioting incidents are the right thing, but this guy could have killed a few people.
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  12. #387
    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
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  13. #388
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    And now they go after the journalists so there is no record of what the police did to the protesters.



    A Reporter’s Cry on Live TV: ‘I’m Getting Shot! I’m Getting Shot!’

    From a television crew assaulted by protesters to a photographer struck in the eye, journalists have found themselves targeted on the streets of America.

    By Frances Robles

    May 30, 2020



    Image Linda Tirado, a freelance photographer, was shot in the eye on Friday while covering protests in Minneapolis.



    Linda Tirado, a freelance photographer, was shot in the eye on Friday while covering protests in Minneapolis.Credit...Linda Tirado

    Linda Tirado, a freelance photographer, activist and author, was shot in the left eye Friday while covering the street protests in Minneapolis.

    Ms. Tirado is one of a number of journalists around the country who were attacked, arrested or otherwise harassed — sometimes by police and sometimes by protesters — during their coverage of the uprisings that have erupted nationwide after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

    With trust in the news media lagging, journalists have found themselves targeted.

    A television reporter in Louisville, Ky., was hit by a pepper ball on live television by an officer who appeared to be aiming at her, causing her to exclaim on the air: “I’m getting shot! I’m getting shot!”

    Outside the White House, protesters attacked a Fox News correspondent and his crew, taking the journalist’s microphone and striking him with it.


    In Atlanta, masses of protesters on Friday night convened on the CNN headquarters, where they broke through the front door, lobbed fireworks and vandalized the building. Earlier in the day, Omar Jimenez, a reporter for the network, was detained as he reported live, despite calmly offering to move to the location of the police officer’s liking. On Saturday, he reported that his crew’s cameraman and producer were hit by rubber bullets.

    Ms. Tirado, 37, drove to Minneapolis from Nashville to photograph the protests, and donned goggles to protect her eyes. In the commotion of running from tear gas, they slipped off her face.


    “I was aiming my next shot, put my camera down for a second, and then my face exploded,” she said in a telephone interview after being released from the hospital. “I immediately felt blood and was screaming, ‘I’m press! I’m press!’”


    Ms. Tirado said the shot, which she thought was a rubber bullet, came from the direction of the police. Protesters carried her out, and she had surgery within the hour. Although doctors told her that she is not likely to recover her vision, she is grateful for one thing: she shoots with her right eye.

    “I would say there is no way that anyone had looked at me and not known that I am a working journalist,” she said. “That said, police have been pretty clear that they don’t care if you are working journalist.”

    John Elder, a spokesman for the Minneapolis Police, said he was unaware of the incident. He said the department has not used rubber bullets for decades.

    “If someone believes that we have injured them, we encourage people to contact our Internal Affairs Unit or the Office of Police Conduct Review,” he said in an email.



    Scenes from the protests over racism and police violence that have erupted across the country.

    In Louisville, police are investigating the circumstances behind the WAVE-3 reporter who was struck.

    “We will identify the officer involved and review the video to determine what was going on at the time and if further action is needed,” Sgt. Lamont Washington, a spokesman, said.

    The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press logged about 10 different incidents that ranged from assaults to menacing in Phoenix, Indianapolis, Atlanta and Minneapolis.


    “With the unraveling of civil peace around the country, reporters are perceived as a target by both the police and the protesters,” said Bruce Brown, the executive director of the Reporters Committee, “and that is an extremely frightening place to be.”

    Leland Vittert, the Fox News journalist who was attacked near the White House, said a man in a hoodie and black bandanna kept hovering around his live shots asking: “Who are you with? Who do you work for?”

    When the man found a photo online that identified Mr. Vittert as an employee of Fox News, the heckler gathered other demonstrators around him.

    As the journalists and their security guards tried to flee, they were pummeled with objects. The security guard was punched in the jaw, and Mr. Vittert was struck with his own microphone.

    “My role as a journalist is to report and show what’s going on,” Mr. Vittert said in an interview. “If there’s some kind of thought that the reason I was targeted is because I work for Fox News, I would like to show them tweets where President Trump has gone after me personally.”

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/30/u...sts-press.html




    Times reporter recounts being hit with tear gas and rubber bullets by Minnesota police

    https://www.latimes.com/world-nation...ear-gas-police

    MINNEAPOLIS —
    By Molly Hennessy-FiskeHouston Bureau Chief

    When Minnesota police advanced on peaceful protesters gathered at an intersection outside the Fifth Precinct late Saturday, I didn’t expect them to fire on reporters.

    I was wrong.

    At about 8:30 p.m., a group of about two dozen Minneapolis police and sheriff’s deputies appeared from behind a chain link fence opposite protesters. They were in riot gear and grasping batons.

    A young African American woman approached the police, arms raised. An officer sprayed her in the face with something that smelled like pepper spray, and the woman ran to seek help from fellow protesters. A young African American man approached the officers, outraged, but another man pulled him back to the main group.


    The police retreated back behind the fence. But moments later, a much larger phalanx of officers in riot gear emerged to block the street
    That left me stuck between the police and protesters, up against the precinct’s brick wall. But I was with a group of other reporters, photographers and cameramen. The wall had small alcoves where we could duck for cover as police passed and advanced on protesters.

    But that’s not what happened.


    “This is the Minnesota State Patrol,” a trooper announced through a bullhorn, notifying protesters they were in violation of the curfew and should disperse.

    I figured he wasn’t talking to us, that the press were exempt, just as during the COVID-19 pandemic we are exempt from quarantines and allowed to travel. We were wearing our credentials. The Times photographer I was with, Carolyn Cole, even wore a flak jacket labeled “Press.”I was wrong.

    The officers started by firing tear gas indiscriminately into the street. We watched, cameras rolling. But instead of passing, the officers turned, backed us up against the precinct wall and fired.

    “Press!” I shouted, waving my notebook an arm’s length from an officer in riot gear advancing through the smoke.


    The officer said nothing, just kept firing. Cole was hit in the face. Other reporters piled on top of me against the wall. That, plus my goggles and mask, shielded me from most of the gas.

    But officers kept firing. We realized we had to run, too. We were not exempt. They were treating us as scofflaws.

    We tried to move along the wall, but it wasn’t clear where the officers wanted us to go. They issued no order, just fired. Cole, the photographer, shouted that she was unable to see because she’d been hit. One of the cameras was still rolling, and my sister, who lives nearby with her family, heard me shouting on television, “Where do we go?”

    The local cameraman filming it was arrested and later released after also displaying his credentials.


    None of the officers responded. Instead, they chased us along the wall and into a corner. Smoke billowed around us. Canisters kept dropping. I was hit in the leg with what I believe was at least one, maybe two rubber bullets.

    I didn’t realize it, but I was bleeding from several wounds to my leg. Blood covered the face mask of a reporter next to me, who was so stunned someone had to tell him he was hurt.

    We were up against another wall. I scaled it and ran to the nearest open door — a senior apartment complex that had allowed a few fleeing protesters to hide. We cowered as officers prowled outside the front window, chasing other people. I called Cole, who had been taken in and treated by a neighbor a few blocks away.

    An 18-year-old protester sheltering with me gave me a ride to the neighbor’s house, and she gave us a ride to seek treatment. As we left, we passed another group of police. They fired a pellet gun at her car, which left red paint on the passenger window. Once we reached a wealthy suburb that hadn’t seen protests, police just waved us through.


    I’ve covered protests involving police in Ferguson, Mo., Baton Rouge, La., Dallas and Los Angeles. I’ve also covered the U.S. military in war zones, including Iraq and Afghanistan. I have never been fired at by police until tonight.
    Last edited by Novice; June 1st, 2020 at 03:37 AM.
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  14. #389
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Simon Moya-Smith
    @SimonMoyaSmith
    I was pepper-sprayed then arrested last night by Minneapolis PD even after identifying myself as a reporter MULTIPLE times:

    Cop 1: *checks press badge as I’m on the ground*
    Cop 2: “Roll on your side, Mr. journalist.”
    Cop 3: *loads me in the car, sees my press badge and shrugs*
    12:23 PM · May 31, 2020·Twitter for iPhone
    https://mobile.twitter.com/SimonMoya...54164774916096
    FBI warned of white supremacists in 2016
    https://www.pbs.org/newshour/amp/nat...mpression=true

    FBI warned of white supremacists in law enforcement 10 years ago. Has anything changed?
    By — Kenya Downs
    Nation Oct 21, 2016 4:10 PM EDT

    Increased attention toward the killing of black men and women by police throughout the past year has ignited national conversations on racism and law enforcement. From Freddie Gray in April 2015 to Deborah Danner — an "emotionally disturbed" woman fatally shot this week by an NYPD officer — protests around the country have forced many Americans to reassess how police engage with communities of color.

    In light of — or perhaps despite — the increased scrutiny, FBI director James Comey told police officers at a national conference last Sunday that because of insufficient data on use of force, "Americans actually have no idea" whether racial bias in policing is really an epidemic. Pointing to current public outrage over police killings of African-Americans, Comey said "the absence of good information" and data has aided in the growing belief that police officers target particular communities.

    READ MORE: Column: White people don't understand the trauma of viral police-killing videos

    "That is the narrative," he told attendees of the International Association of Chiefs of Police. "It is a narrative driven by video images of real misconduct, possible misconduct and perceived misconduct."

    But even if there aren't hard statistics, the problem of racial bias among police isn't new. In fact, it's been a concern of the FBI for at least a decade. Exactly 10 years ago this week, the FBI warned of the potential consequences — including bias — of white supremacist groups infiltrating local and state law enforcement, indicating it was a significant threat to national security.

    In the 2006 bulletin, the FBI detailed the threat of white nationalists and skinheads infiltrating police in order to disrupt investigations against fellow members and recruit other supremacists. The bulletin was released during a period of scandal for many law enforcement agencies throughout the country, including a neo-Nazi gang formed by members of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department who harassed black and Latino communities. Similar investigations revealed officers and entire agencies with hate group ties in Illinois, Ohio and Texas.

    Much of the bulletin has been redacted, but in it, the FBI identified white supremacists in law enforcement as a concern, because of their access to both "restricted areas vulnerable to sabotage" and elected officials or people who could be seen as "potential targets for violence." The memo also warned of "ghost skins," hate group members who don't overtly display their beliefs in order to "blend into society and covertly advance white supremacist causes."

    "At least one white supremacist group has reportedly encouraged ghost skins to seek positions in law enforcement for the capability of alerting skinhead crews of pending investigative action against them," the report read.

    Problems with white supremacists in law enforcement have surfaced since that report. In 2014, two Florida officers — including a deputy police chief — were fired after an FBI informant outed them as members of the Ku Klux Klan. It marked the second time within five years that the agency uncovered an officer's membership in the KKK. Several agencies nationwide have also launched investigations into personnel who may not be formal hate group members, but face allegations of race-based misconduct.


    "Many people in these communities of color feel they have been the subject of police violence for decades. And when an officer engages in conduct that adds or enhances that divide, they are ultimately jeopardizing the integrity of their agencies and putting their fellow officers in danger."

    Social media has made it easier to expose white supremacists who serve in law enforcement. In September 2015, a North Carolina police officer was fired after a picture of him giving a Nazi salute surfaced on Facebook. And as recently as August, the Philadelphia Police Department launched an internal investigation after attendees of a Black Lives Matter rally outside the Democratic National Convention spotted an officer in charge of crowd control with a tattoo of the Nazi Party emblem on his forearm and posted the image on Instagram.

    "Many people in these communities of color feel they have been the subject of police violence for decades," said Samuel Jones, professor of law at the John Marshall School of Law in Chicago. "And when an officer engages in conduct that adds or enhances that divide, they are ultimately jeopardizing the integrity of their agencies and putting their fellow officers in danger."

    Policing in America has historically had racial implications. The earliest forms of organized law enforcement in the U.S. can be traced to slave patrols that tracked down escaped slaves, and overseers assigned to guard settler communities from Native Americans. In the centuries since, many law enforcement agencies directly participated in antagonizing communities of color, or provided a shield for others who did. But in the 10 years since the FBI's initial warning, little has changed, Jones said.

    Neither the FBI nor state and local law enforcement agencies have established systems for vetting personnel for potential supremacist links, he said. That task is left primarily to everyday citizens and nonprofit organizations like the Southern Poverty Law Center, one of few that tracks the growing number of hate groups in America.

    "We catch them when we can, which means when we notice someone and check in the database," said Heidi Beirich, director of the Intelligence Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center. The group is responsible for exposing an Alabama officer as a member of a white nationalist hate group, League of the South, after he spoke at their national conference in 2013. The officer was later fired.

    "Obviously, we do not want people with white supremacist or other extremist views to be in such positions, so it is important to screen them out," she added.

    The First Amendment's freedoms of association and expression mean it's perfectly legal for anyone to join a hate group — as long as it's for the purpose of legal activity — and still be a member of law enforcement. They can even serve in other positions of public office. But according to the FBI memo, the government can limit employment opportunities of members "when their memberships would interfere with their duties." Jones says that's problematic.

    "I cannot imagine that the FBI today could issue a report concerning any kind of threat without people being alarmed and wanting immediate action," he said. "But in this case there seems to be almost an acceptance of it. The thought is 'it's just ideology and they have a right to believe this.'"

    In response to our inquiry, the FBI said it "routinely shares information about potential threats to better enable law enforcement" but does not "comment on specific law enforcement bulletins."

    There are, of course, police officers who recognize racial bias and are calling for change. At the same conference where FBI director James Comey spoke of the uncertainty of policing bias, the head of the International Association of Chiefs of Police [IACP], Terrence Cunningham apologized for what he called "historical mistreatment" of racial minorities.

    "While we obviously cannot change the past, it is clear that we must change the future," he said. "For our part, the first step is for law enforcement and the IACP to acknowledge and apologize for the actions of the past and the role that our profession has played in society's historical mistreatment of communities of color."

    These conversations come as the Department of Justice announced it's launching a national database on use of force and deaths in police custody.

    For many like Jones, it's another step toward accountability. But questions remain on how to tackle bias early on: One way to do that, he said, would involve screening would-be personnel for bias and supremacist ties, something the FBI acknowledged as a threat a decade before viral videos of police killings became nearly a weekly discussion.

    As the nation continues to examine the role of race in law enforcement, many like Jones question whether scrutiny of the infiltration by white supremacists will move beyond the FBI's acknowledgement a decade ago to specific action in the decades to come.

    "There needs to more direct enforcement," Jones said. "It's one thing to issue a memo, and another to have continued action after it. There was a warning 10 years ago and nothing else since then."

  15. #390
    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
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