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Thread: The Manchurine candidate - Trump rule past 100 days

  1. #721
    Elite Member witchcurlgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toronto View Post

    Jeezus, whats with all the negativity on this site??!!
    Oh honey, if it bothers you, there's the door....bye!
    greysfang, czb, gas_chick and 8 others like this.



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  2. #722
    czb
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    please don't engage with it, maybe it will go away.

  3. #723
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    Source: Occupy Democrats



    Ivanka Trump Just Went On FOX TO Defend Her Dad And It Immediately Backfired

    This morning Ivanka Trump appeared on the make-believe news show Fox & Friends to complain about how people are treating her father. Twitter is not having it. Tossed a softball by her father’s de facto state media enablers about whether her “job” is harder than she thought, Ivanka complained that it was. “It is hard,” she told her FOX friends in the below video. “There is a level of viciousness that I was not expecting. I was not expecting the intensity of this experience.”


    Forgetting for a second that she is admitting a woeful lack of preparation for the roles her father tapped her for — perhaps an indication that nepotism is not the best hiring philosophy — it’s important to remember that Ivanka inhabits these roles because her father engaged in an unprecedented level of bullying and cruelty, first to win election and then as President of the United States.



    The Twitterverse let Ivanka know exactly what it thought of Ivanka’s disgusting hypocrisy. Below are some of the highlights.


    Enjoy:


    Moira Whelan‏@moira
    Your father attacked the Khan family, women, reporters...you brought it with you to my town. You should feel free to leave at any time










    When the president is the guy who bragged about "grab her by the pussy," I totally see how you were surprised by the "viciousness"
    — Abraham Gutman

    Sam Stein@samsteinhp
    vicious like mocking a war hero, or a gold star mom, or a disabled reporter, or suggesting someone's dad killed JFK, or being a birther?
    West Wing Reports@WestWingReport
    @IvankaTrump comment that sometimes life is "hard" is the kind of tone-deaf comment someone who has spent a lifetime in a bubble might say
    lisa oakes‏ @kneadinghands
    This coming from daughter of a man who encouraged single moms to take out loans to pay for Trump U scam, yet she defends that disgusting
    John Podhoretz‏@jpodhoretz
    Her father said Ben Carson was a psychopath and Ted Cruz's father killed JFK and she wasn't expecting viciousness. She's a filthy liar.
    Rossssc‏ @rossssc

    Ivanka Trump shorter: Wahhhh Wahhhh Wahhhhh "those people without Health Care and Food are being mean to me" > Level of Viciousness my ASS! Victoria Brownworth‏ @VABVOX




















    this was your father's response to #PulseNightclub shooting. #LGBT people "didn't expect this level of viciousness."
    I dare her to go on Sesame Street and answer a few questions, at this point. Elmo delivers harder hitting journalism than Fox and Friends!



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  4. #724
    Elite Member OrangeSlice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toronto View Post
    I'm not American but I think your country will be fine
    I also wish you all the best in the life, and I hope it doesnt kill you (whatever "it" is).


    Jeezus, whats with all the negativity on this site??!!

    Only saw this because it was quoted, but:

    "Schadenfreude, hard to spell, easy to feel." ~VenusinFauxFurs

    "Scoffing is one of my main hobbies!" ~Trixie

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    Elite Member greysfang's Avatar
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    Don'cha think?
    FUCK YOU AND GIVE ME MY GODDAMN VENTI TWO PUMP LIGHT WHIP MOCHA YOU COCKSUCKING WHORE BEFORE I PUNCH YOU IN THE MOUTH. I just get unpleasant in my car. - Deej

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    Quote Originally Posted by witchcurlgirl View Post
    Oh honey, if it bothers you, there's the door....bye!
    I thought this was a neutral forum where everyone could express their own political opinions.

    Was I wrong??

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    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeSlice View Post
    Only saw this because it was quoted, but:

    Irony in which way?? Can you give examples??

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    Elite Member stella blue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gas_chick View Post
    I feel like a Dump supporter right now. Wishing so hardcore for idiots like you to get exactly what you deserve with him in office even if it kills me.
    Welcome to the dark side. I've been right there since election night. I get positively giddy when I hear of bad things happening to drumpf voters.

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    Elite Member witchcurlgirl's Avatar
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    Speaking of:


    Rural Appalachia is facing a healthcare crisis. I fear it's going to get much worse

    Jessika Bohon



    If th
    If the Republican party throws up its barriers to Medicaid, there will be many victims of that decision. Including my own friends and familye Republican party throws up its barriers to Medicaid, there will be many victims of that decision. Including my own friends and family
    My family lives in Central Appalachia in places too tiny to be called towns. These rural “hollers” are the heart of this beautiful but hard-scrabbled mountainous region. Mountain roads are so difficult to navigate here that medicine is delivered by drones. So when the Republican party throws up its barriers to Medicaid, it will be rendered useless to many rural people in the region. Work requirements, co-payments, cancellation of transportation services and lockouts to coverage will cause people that I love to lose their health insurance.

    My cousin William could be kicked off right away if Medicaid is tied to a work requirement. A few years ago he quit one of the good and only jobs in rural Appalachia, cashiering at a large retail store, because he refused to work off the clock. His mom died shortly afterwards from her third bout with cancer and then his dad died six months later on. Homeless in the blink of an eye, he started to sell bootleg DVDs at flea markets. The FBI caught him and now he is a felon who cannot find a job. As soon as next week, he may also lose his access to preventative health care for his genetic predisposition to cancer.

    My mom would also be denied Medicaid under the work requirement today. She raised us on Medicaid and welfare in a HUD trailer deep in a holler. Her parents died when she was a toddler and my dad left when I was three. Being a single mother without a car or a support system to provide daycare meant that she could not work, even if jobs were readily available, which they were not.
    She would also not be able to pay the co-payments that for the first time would be required for single moms like her. She picked up tin cans on the side of the road to collect cash to feed her family and rolled pennies to buy school supplies for us, so it would have been impossible for her to pay a $14 co-payment to go to the doctor.
    When my sister’s asthma acted up, my single mom made an appointment and soon a Medicaid van picked us up to go to the pediatrician. The van ride was warm in the winter and it comforted me, looking out the window at the mountains knowing that my sister was on her way to get her new inhaler. But the proposed Medicaid overhaul will idle Medicaid vans.


    My aunt Laura and uncle Don take the Medicaid van to the methadone clinic. An underground coal miner, my uncle’s doctor told him that the pain pills that he took for his back were not addictive. He shared his pills with my aunt to erase the pain of her frequent migraines and soon enough they were both doctor shopping to get multiple prescriptions for OxyContin.


    It took losing their home and their jobs, wrecking two cars and multiple visits to the emergency room for overdoses to prepare them to quit the powerful drugs. They also lost their driver’s licenses and most of their friends, so Medicaid is their only source for transportation to drug therapy.


    My close friend Whitney rides in the Medicaid van every Wednesday to occupational therapy. Seven years ago she couldn’t shake off what she thought was the flu but she didn’t have insurance to go to the doctor. Turns out she had contracted viral meningitis from a mosquito bite and she ended up in the ICU for a month in a coma. Now she has traumatic brain injury and severe epilepsy as a result of the prolonged infection.


    Occupational therapy teaches Whitney coping skills like organization to combat memory loss and what she calls “the ticks crawling in my head.” She forgets her doctor’s appointments and to take her medicine sometimes. If she forgets the new Republican requirement to renew her Medicaid eligibility and is locked out of coverage for six months, she could seize uncontrollably and die.


    Congress will justify this bad faith Medicaid by claiming that Whitney has to be more responsible. But my family and friends are fighting against circumstances beyond their control and they cannot be judged or admonished for it. In fact, what happened to Whitney could have happened to anybody.


    It is not the people but Congress who is responsible to legislate against luck so that a mosquito bite cannot destroy a person’s life. Nobody controls when they get sick. It is up to the government to put their finger on the scales against this inevitable fate for health justice for all, including the forgotten people of rural Appalachia.




    https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...isis-medicaid-



    All of God's children are not beautiful. Most of God's children are, in fact, barely presentable.


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  10. #730
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toronto View Post
    Well.......the Russia and Comey investigations didnt go anywhere, lets see where this one goes.
    My guess is it'll be strike 3
    I don't understand the above statement. The investigations are still in their early phases. As an example, Comey, in early May, had asked for additional resources for the Russia investigation. Michael Flynn still has not provided testimony to the Intelligence Committtees.

  11. #731
    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
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    Source: The Washington Post

    This is an interactive article where you can hover over the claims on the site for more information.
    Memberships at his golf club in Briarcliff Manor, N.Y., cost $300,000.
    Trump Tower Las Vegas was mostly sold out.
    Trump Tower Las Vegas was worth $4.3 million.
    His Seven Springs property was worth $150 million because he planned to build homes on it.
    He sold a home lot in California for about $4 million.
    His net worth was between $5 billion and $6 billion in the early 2000s.
    The operating income at Trump Tower was $17.5 million per year.
    He had “zero borrowings” from his father’s estate.
    Trump said 22,000 people worked for him.
    Trump owned a 50 percent stake in the West Side Yards real estate development partnership.
    He was paid $1 million for a single speech in 2005.
    He “largely” owned the Waikiki Trump Tower building.
    In the early 1990s, he was $9.2 billion in debt.
    Trump Tower Las Vegas brought in $1.3 billion.
    His net worth in 2004 was $3.5 billion.



    Trump: A true story

    The mogul, in a 2007 deposition, had to face up to a series of falsehoods and exaggerations. And he did. Sort of.








    The lawyer gave Donald Trump a note, written in Trump’s own handwriting. He asked Trump to read it aloud.


    Trump may not have realized it yet, but he had walked into a trap.


    “Peter, you’re a real loser,” Trump began reading.


    The mogul had sent the note to a reporter, objecting to a story that said Trump owned a “small minority stake” in a Manhattan real estate project. Trump insisted that the word “small” was incorrect. Trump continued reading: “I wrote, ‘Is 50 percent small?’ ”


    “This [note] was intended to indicate that you had a 50 percent stake in the project, correct?” said the lawyer.


    “That’s correct,” Trump said.


    For the first of many times that day, Trump was about to be caught saying something that wasn’t true.



    It was a mid-December morning in 2007 — the start of an interrogation unlike anything else in the public record of Trump’s life.


    Trump had brought it on himself. He had sued a reporter, accusing him of being reckless and dishonest in a book that raised questions about Trump’s net worth. The reporter’s attorneys turned the tables and brought Trump in for a deposition.


    For two straight days, they asked Trump question after question that touched on the same theme: Trump’s honesty.


    The lawyers confronted the mogul with his past statements — and with his company’s internal documents, which often showed those statements had been incorrect or invented. The lawyers were relentless. Trump, the bigger-than-life mogul, was vulnerable — cornered, out-prepared and under oath.


    Thirty times, they caught him.


    Trump had misstated sales at his condo buildings. Inflated the price of membership at one of his golf clubs. Overstated the depth of his past debts and the number of his employees.





    That deposition — 170 transcribed pages — offers extraordinary insights into Trump’s relationship with the truth. Trump’s falsehoods were unstrategic — needless, highly specific, easy to disprove. When caught, Trump sometimes blamed others for the error or explained that the untrue thing really was true, in his mind, because he saw the situation more positively than others did.


    “Have you ever lied in public statements about your properties?” the lawyer asked.


    “I try and be truthful,” Trump said. “I’m no different from a politician running for office. You always want to put the best foot forward.”


    In his presidential campaign, Trump has sought to make his truth-telling a selling point. He nicknamed his main Republican opponent “Lyin’ Ted” Cruz. He called his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton, “A PATHOLOGICAL LIAR!” in a recent Twitter message. “I will present the facts plainly and honestly,” he said in the opening of his speech at the Republican National Convention. “We cannot afford to be so politically correct anymore.”


    Trump has had a habit of telling demonstrable untruths during his presidential campaign. The Washington Post’s Fact Checker has awarded him four Pinocchios — the maximum a statement can receive — 39 times since he announced his bid last summer. In many cases, his statements echo those in the 2007 deposition: They are specific, checkable — and wrong.


    Trump said he opposed the Iraq War at the start. He didn’t. He said he’d never mocked a disabled New York Times reporter. He had. Trump also said the National Football League had sent him a letter, objecting to a presidential debate that was scheduled for the same time as a football game. It hadn’t.





    Last week, Trump claimed that he had seen footage — taken at a top-secret location and released by the Iranian government — showing a plane unloading a large amount of cash to Iran from the U.S. government. He hadn’t. Trump later conceded he’d been mistaken — he’d seen TV news video that showed a plane during a prisoner release.


    But, even under the spotlight of this campaign, Trump has never had an experience quite like this deposition on Dec. 19 and 20, 2007.


    He was trapped in a room — with his own prior statements and three high-powered lawyers.


    “A very clear and visible side effect of my lawyers’ questioning of Trump is that he [was revealed as] a routine and habitual fabulist,” said Timothy L. O’Brien, the author Trump had sued.


    The Washington Post sent the Trump campaign a detailed list of questions about this deposition, listing all the times when Trump seemed to have been caught in a false or unsupported statement. The Post asked Trump whether he wanted to challenge any of those findings — and whether he had felt regret when confronted with them.


    He did not answer those questions.



    LEFT: Timothy L. O’Brien’s book “Trump Nation: The Art of Being the Donald.” RIGHT: Andrew Ceresney, top, and Mary Jo White, left, who represented O’Brien in the suit Trump brought against him. (Open Road Integrated Media; Mark Lennihan/AP; Seth Wenig/AP)



    In 2005, O’Brien, then a reporter for the New York Times, had published a book called “Trump Nation: The Art of Being the Donald.” In the book, O’Brien cited people who questioned a claim at the bedrock of Trump’s identity — that his net worth was more than $5 billion. O’Brien said he had spoken to three people who estimated that the figure was between $150 million and $250 million.


    Trump sued. He later told The Post that he intended to hurt O’Brien, whom he called a “lowlife sleazebag.”


    “I didn’t read [the book], to be honest with you. . . . I never read it. I saw some of the things they said,” Trump said later. “I said: ‘Go sue him. It will cost him a lot of money.’ ”


    By filing suit, Trump hadn’t just opened himself up to questioning — he had opened a door into the opaque and secretive company he ran.


    O’Brien’s attorneys included Mary Jo White, now the chair of the Securities and Exchange Commission, and Andrew Ceresney, now the SEC’s director of enforcement. The lawsuit had given them the power to request that Trump turn over internal company documents, and they used it. They arrived at the deposition having already identified where Trump’s public statements hadn’t matched the private truth.





    The questions began with that handwritten note and the 50 percent stake that wasn’t 50 percent.


    “The 30 percent equates to much more than 30 percent,” Trump explained. His reasoning was that he had not been required to put up money at the outset, so his 30 percent share seemed more valuable.


    “Are you saying that the real estate community would interpret your interest to be 50 percent, even though in limited partnership agreements it’s 30 percent?” Ceresney asked.


    “Smart people would,” Trump said.


    “Smart people?”


    “Smart people would say it’s much more than 30 percent.”


    Trump inflates the numbers



    On to the next one.


    “I was paid more than a million dollars,” Trump said when Ceresney asked how much he’d been paid for a speech in 2005 at New York City’s Learning Annex, a continuing-education center.


    Ceresney was ready.


    “But how much of the payments were cash?”


    “Approximately $400,000,” Trump said.


    Trump said his personal math included the intangible value of publicity: The Learning Annex had advertised his speech heavily, and Trump thought that helped his brand. Therefore, in his mind he’d been paid more than $1 million, even though his actual payment was $400,000.


    “Do you actually say that, when you say you got a million dollars publicly?” Ceresney asked.


    “I don’t break it down,” Trump said.


    As the deposition went on, the lawyers led Trump through case after case in which he’d overstated his success.

    Donald Trump, right, is interviewed by Larry King during a taping of "Larry King Live" on Oct., 7, 1999. (Marty Lederhandler/AP)




    The lawyer played a clip from Larry King’s talk show, in which King asked Trump how many people worked for him. “Twenty-two thousand or so,” Trump said.


    “Are all those people on your payroll?” Ceresney asked him.


    “No, not directly,” Trump said. He said he was counting employees of other companies that acted as suppliers and subcontractors to his businesses.


    Another one. In O’Brien’s book, Trump had been quoted saying: “I had zero borrowings from [my father’s] estate. . . . I give you my word.”


    Under oath:


    “Mr. Trump, have you ever borrowed money from your father’s estate?”


    “I think a small amount a long time ago,” Trump said. “I think it was like in the $9 million range.”


    Another one. In one of his own books, Trump had said about one of his golf courses: “Membership costs $300,000. I think it’s a bargain.”


    Under oath:


    “In fact, your memberships were not selling at $300,000 at that time, correct?”


    “We’ve sold many for two hundred” thousand, Trump said. Then, Trump pushed it upward: “We’ve sold many for, I think, two-fifty.”


    But this was not the place to push it.


    The lawyer had an internal Trump document that showed the true figure — “$200,000 per membership,” Ceresney said.


    “Correct,” Trump acknowledged. “Right.”


    In some cases, Trump acknowledged he was wrong — but not that he was at fault. Instead, he sought to turn the blame on others.


    “This is somebody that wrote it, probably Meredith McIver,” Trump said at one point when confronted with another false statement. “That is a mistake.”


    McIver, a staff writer with the Trump Organization, blazed into the public eye last month for having inserted plagiarized material — taken from Michelle Obama’s 2008 convention speech — in the convention speech of Trump’s wife, Melania. McIver said it had been an innocent mistake.


    But in this deposition more than eight years earlier, Trump was blaming her for a mistake in one of his own books, “How to Get Rich.” In the 2004 book, co-written with McIver, Trump described his massive debt load during a low period in the early 1990s. “I owed billions upon billions of dollars — $9.2 billion to be exact,” the book said as it retold the story of his rise back to success.

    Trump signs copies of his new book "How to Get Rich" in New York in 2004. (Ramin Talaie/Corbis via Getty Images)



    The depth of that financial hole made it seem even more impressive that Trump had climbed out again. But the figure was wrong. His actual debts had been much less.


    “I pointed it out to the person who wrote the book,” Trump said, meaning McIver.


    “Right after she wrote the book?”


    “That’s correct,” Trump said.


    Then the lawyer showed Trump another book he’d written with McIver, three years later.


    “In fact, I was $9 billion in debt,” Trump read aloud. A similar error, repeated. It was McIver’s fault again.


    “She probably forgot,” Trump said.


    “And when you read it, you didn’t correct it?”


    “I didn’t see it,” Trump said.


    “You didn’t see it.”


    “I read it very quickly,” Trump said about a book he was credited with writing.



    In other cases, the lawyers prodded Trump into admitting that he had made authoritative-sounding statements without any proof behind them. These statements were another kind of untruth.


    They were not necessarily false. They might have been true.


    But Trump said them without knowing one way or the other.


    “What basis do you have for that statement?” Ceresney asked in one case, about an assertion from Trump that O’Brien had been reported to the police for stalking.


    “I guess that was probably taken off the Internet,” Trump said.





    On to the next one.


    “You wrote, ‘O’Brien . . . threatened sources by telling them he can, quote, settle scores with enemies by writing negative articles about them,’ ” Ceresney asked, reading Trump’s words from a legal complaint. “What was the basis for that statement?”


    “Just my perception of him,” Trump said. “I don’t know that he indicated anything like that to me, but I think he probably did indirectly.”


    The most striking example was a question at the very heart of the legal case: What was Trump’s actual net worth?


    Trump had told O’Brien he was worth up to $6 billion. But the lawyers confronted him with other documents — from Trump’s accountants and from outside banks — that seemed to show the real figure was far lower.


    The lawyers asked: “Have you ever not been truthful” about your net worth?


    Trump’s answer here was that the truth about his wealth was — in essence — up to him to decide.


    Trump outside the 92-story Trump International Hotel and Tower underway in Chicago in 2007. (Charles Rex Arbogast/AP)



    “My net worth fluctuates, and it goes up and down with markets and with attitudes and with feelings, even my own feelings,” Trump said. “But I try.”


    The interrogation finally ended after two days. Trump’s attorney made a final demand.


    “I want the record to be crystal clear that every single word, every question, every answer, every word, is confidential,” said the attorney, Mark Ressler.


    In 2009, a judge dismissed Trump’s case against O’Brien. Trump appealed, but in 2011 that was denied, too.


    Along the way, this once-confidential deposition became part of the public record when O’Brien’s attorneys attached it to one of their motions.


    In a brief statement this week, Trump said he felt the lawsuit was a success, despite his loss.


    “O’Brien knows nothing about me,” Trump said. “His book was a total failure and ultimately I had great success doing what I wanted to do — costing this third rate reporter a lot of legal fees.”


    O’Brien, now executive editor of Bloomberg View, said Trump got that wrong. The publisher and insurance companies covered the cost.


    “Donald Trump lost his lawsuit and, unlike him, it didn’t cost me a penny to litigate it,” he said.


    Rosalind S. Helderman contributed to this report.

    panic and C_is_for_Cookie like this.
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    Elite Member witchcurlgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MohandasKGanja View Post
    I don't understand the above statement. The investigations are still in their early phases. As an example, Comey, in early May, had asked for additional resources for the Russia investigation. Michael Flynn still has not provided testimony to the Intelligence Committtees.

    Someone doesn't seem to be aware of US political scandal history- like the fact that Watergate took over 2 years, and that people were being convicted in the Teapot Dome scandal 5 years after the story first came to light. (And they're going to school us, thank goodness.) But that's just they way trolls are, they aren't interested in actual discussion, just childish interactions.



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  13. #733
    Elite Member stella blue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by witchcurlgirl View Post
    Speaking of:


    Rural Appalachia is facing a healthcare crisis. I fear it's going to get much worse

    ...
    Bootstraps, motherfuckers. If it's good enough for the inner city, it's good enough for Cletus the Slackjawed Yokel.

    You voted for it, so stew in it, assholes.

  14. #734
    Elite Member stella blue's Avatar
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    Epic trolling from Chuck Schumer and team:

    https://twitter.com/SenSchumer/statu...883456/video/1
    panic and C_is_for_Cookie like this.

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    Elite Member witchcurlgirl's Avatar
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    Trump travel ban suffers new court defeat

    A US appeals court has upheld a decision blocking President Trump's revised "travel ban" on people from six mainly Muslim nations.


    A lower court had issued the injunction on the grounds that the ban was discriminatory after a challenge by the state of Hawaii.


    The 90-day ban was to apply to people from Iran, Libya, Syria, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen.


    It also called for a 120-day ban on all refugees.


    The Ninth US Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco was reviewing a March ruling by a Hawaii-based federal judge that blocked parts of Mr Trump's order.


    In their ruling, the judges said that "immigration, even for the President, is not a one-person show".


    They said Mr Trump had failed to show that the entry of people from the six countries mentioned in the ban, as well as the refugees, would be detrimental to US interests.


    But the judges said the government was allowed to review the vetting process for people entering the US - something the earlier Hawaii ruling had blocked.


    The administration has said the travel ban is needed to prevent terrorism in the US.


    The latest ruling follows another ruling in May by a different court, the Fourth US Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia, that upheld a Maryland judge's ruling that also blocked parts of Mr Trump's revised ban.


    Earlier this month the Trump administration filed an emergency request with the Supreme Court to block the Hawaii and Maryland rulings and revive the ban.


    Lawyers for Hawaii had described Mr Trump's executive order as a "thinly veiled Muslim ban".


    The Supreme Court will decide whether Mr Trump's comments during his election campaign can be used as evidence that the executive order was intended to discriminate against Muslims, which would be against the US constitution.


    During his election campaign, Mr Trump called for a "total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States".


    An earlier version of Mr Trump's travel ban, issued in January, sparked confusion and protests and was blocked by a judge in Seattle because it probably violated the due process rights of individuals with valid residency papers and visas.


    Trump travel ban suffers new court defeat - BBC News



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