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Thread: It's Mueller Time! The new politics catch-all thread.

  1. #436
    Elite Member Nevan's Avatar
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    Not for nothing, but I got a Keurig for me and my kid as a family gift for Christmas. It’s a realllly nice one. I hate it. I don’t drink coffee and my son drinks it here or there. I bought it mainly for hot chocolate for him and hot tea for me. We used it for two months and haven’t used it since. I stopped after I tried to get hot water out of it to make my banana oatmeal and after three tries, the water was so dirty I kept tossing it out. I guess I shouldn’t have bought a coffee pot for two (mostly) non-coffee drinkers. Great marketing, but I’d rather steep a tea bag in the microwave. But Team Keurig!!
    "No. I love my grudges. I tend to them like little pets." -Madeline Martha Mackenzie

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  2. #437
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    I'm horrible. I love my Keurig. I have one that only makes one cup at a time -- there's no big reservoir. I don't drink a lot of coffee and it makes perfect coffee for me. It's quick, easy, and Aldi has the best pods. Their dark roast is yummy and super inexpensive. I'm sorry Mother Earth. I do so many other things that are environmentally friendly, but I do love my Keurig.

    Anyone that hates Fox News has my support.

  3. #438
    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
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    Source: Politico

    Donald Trump says ‘people will die’ as a result of focus on Russia allegations



    U.S. President Donald Trump (left) chats with Russia's President Vladimir Putin as they attend the APEC Economic Leaders' Meeting in the central Vietnamese city of Danang on November 11, 2017 | Mikhail Klimentyev/AFP via Getty Images




    DANANG, Vietnam — President Donald Trump on Saturday called into question the American intelligence community’s assessment that Russia sought to influence last year’s presidential election, while raising concerns that the intense focus on the issue could sour U.S. relations with Vladimir Putin.


    Pressed by reporters, Trump didn’t directly say whether he personally believed Putin was involved in the alleged election meddling. But he suggested he takes the Russian president at his word when he denies directing the influence campaign.


    “Every time he sees me he says, ‘I didn’t do that,’ and I really believe, that when he tells me that, he means it,” Trump said, speaking to reporters aboard Air Force One en route to Hanoi, Vietnam. ”But he says, ‘I didn’t do that.’ I think he is very insulted by it, which is not a good thing for our country.”


    Trump dismissed the meddling allegations as driven by Democrats, warning that the heavy focus on the issue threatens the United States’ ability to partner with Russia on key issues. He asserted that the allegations could fray the U.S.-Russia relationship so badly that the country could be less willing to cooperate on North Korea, Syria and other international crises — an outcome that would put lives at risk.


    “This artificial Democratic hit job gets in the way and that’s a shame because people will die because of it,” he said. “And it’s a pure hit job.”


    “Everybody knows there was no collusion,” he continued. “I think it’s a shame that something like this can destroy a very important potential relationship between two countries that are very important countries Russia could really help us.”


    The president said Putin again denied that he had a role in the effort to influence the election during a few brief conversations that the two leaders had on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit.


    “He said he didn’t meddle. I asked him again. You can only ask so many times. I just asked him again. He said he absolutely did not meddle in our election. He did not do what they are saying he did,” Trump said, adding that he and Putin, “have the potential to have a very good relationship.”

    American intelligence agencies have said Russia interfered in the election with the goal of boosting Trump and defeating Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton. The agencies have also said they have “high confidence” that Putin directed the effort.


    Trump said he and Putin had “two or three very short conversations” during the APEC summit. The White House had previously said the two leaders would not hold a formal meeting.


    Putin and Trump largely focused on Syria during their chats, according to the president.


    Following the discussions, the U.S. and Russia released a joint statement on Saturday in which they “confirmed their determination to defeat ISIS in Syria.”


    Trump later declined to say whether embattled Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore should resign, adding that he doesn’t know enough about the allegations to weigh in. Moore has been accused of initiating sexual contact with teenagers decades ago.


    “Well again, I’ve been with you folks, so I haven’t gotten to see too much,” he said. “And believe it or not, even when I’m in Washington or New York, I do not watch much television. I know they like to say that.”


    Source: CNN

    Two former intelligence chiefs blast Trump over Russia comments





    Story highlights

    • "I do think both the Chinese and the Russians think they can play him," said James Clapper
    • Over the weekend, Trump had mixed remarks about Russian meddling and called the former intelligence officials "political hacks"




    Washington (CNN)A pair of former US intelligence chiefs blasted President Donald Trump Sunday after he attacked them a day earlier while discussing his recent conversation with Russian President Vladimir Putin.



    Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said Sunday on CNN"s "State of the Union" that Trump's downplaying of the threat posed by Russia's meddling in last year's election was dangerous to US national security and allows countries like Russia and China to "play" the President. Former CIA Director John Brennan said Trump is allowing Putin to get away with Russia's efforts to disrupt the presidential election.


    Speaking alongside Brennan, Clapper said: "The threat posed by Russia, as John just said, is manifest and obvious. To try to paint it in any other way is, I think, astounding, and in fact, poses a peril to this country."


    Clapper, a CNN analyst, was responding to Trump's mixed comments about alleged Russian interference in the 2016 election.
    'Giving Putin a pass'

    Brennan said Trump was in effect "giving Putin a pass," which invited other countries to seek to sway Trump.


    Clapper concurred, saying, "I do think both the Chinese and the Russians think they can play him."


    Brennan said Putin's apparent success with Trump was due to his use of flattery and Brennan's suspicion that Trump "for whatever reason" might be "intimidated" by Putin.


    "It's either naiveté, ignorance or fear in terms of what Mr. Trump is doing vis-a-vis the Russians," Brennan said.
    President clarifies his Saturday statement on believing Putin

    Trump, while speaking Sunday at a news conference in Hanoi, sought to clarify remarks he made a day earlier that suggested Russian President Vladimir Putin was being sincere in his denials that Moscow engaged in election meddling.


    The President stressed he was not accepting Putin's denials at face value, instead saying he merely believed Putin was being genuine.


    "I believe that he feels that he and Russia did not meddle in the election," Trump said. "As to whether I believe it or not, I am with our agencies, especially as currently constituted with the leadership."


    But he again stopped short of stating explicitly that Russia was behind the interference in the 2016 presidential election, which US intelligence has determined was conducted to help Trump.


    Trump on Saturday also dismissed former officials like Clapper, Brennan and former FBI Director James Comey as "political hacks."


    The intelligence community released an unclassified version of its assessment in January, saying Putin ordered the election meddling to hurt Hillary Clinton's candidacy and bolster Trump's successful bid. Putin denies the accusations, and Trump has wavered publicly on his own stance.


    Brennan said he considered Trump's attack on them as an attempt to undermine the credibility of that intelligence community report, which the former CIA director noted was written by intelligence and law enforcement officers, not himself, Clapper or Comey.


    "He was referring to us as political hacks because he was trying to delegitimize the intelligence community assessment," Brennan said.
    The Obama-era CIA chief added that he took the criticism from Trump with pride.


    "Considering the source of the criticism, I consider that criticism a badge of honor," Brennan said.


    Asked about his own knowledge of any potential collusion between Trump's associates and Russia, Brennan demurred, saying he had spoken with the congressional investigators, and went on later in the interview to praise former FBI Director Robert Mueller, who is leading the special counsel investigation.


    Clapper said that although he had "no direct evidence of collusion" while still on the job, he did not know about former Trump foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos' activities, which were revealed last month in unsealed court documents. Papadopoulos pleaded guilty last month to making a false statement to the FBI after he lied about his interactions with a foreign contact close to the Russian government.


    Since leaving government, Clapper said more information had come out that raises at least "circumstantial questions" about potential connections between Trump's associates and Russia.
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    Warren Beatty: actor, director, writer, producer.

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  4. #439
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    I seriously can't with this man. He is so anti-American it isn't even funny. He should just rename the country Trumpland, kick out everyone who isn't white, let Putin fuck us all over some more, line his cronies' pockets, destroy whoever is left with a few wars and sit on his throne of lies eating Quarter Pounders until he explodes. I loathe him and everything he has done to this country.
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  5. #440
    Elite Member BITTER's Avatar
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    And it looks like STORMFRONT is a thing again...I thought that they had been banned from the Web. Guess they found another webmaster who doesn't mind blood money. The alt-right doesn't need any more outlets than they already have.
    "I am a social vegan; I avoid meet!” Anonymous Introvert

  6. #441
    Elite Member Nevan's Avatar
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    I’m not really concerned at this point if the investigation makes our relationship with Putin strained. Putin is not our friend. Putin is not out for the best interests of anyone but Russia (one of his only admirable traits ... you can’t say the man doesn’t love his motherland, well at least as long as he’s running it).

    And wtf kind of bullshit is he trying to pull? “I don’t believe what the FBI, CIA or NSA say about anything.” “Putin said so, and why shouldn’t I believe him?”

    Really? Does he think we’re all stupid? Or is he so far up Putin’s ass that he’s become part Russian and is out for Russia’s best interests instead?
    OCD and Kittylady like this.
    "No. I love my grudges. I tend to them like little pets." -Madeline Martha Mackenzie

    Spirituality is not religion. Religion divides people. Belief in something unites them.

    Don't tell me not to worry ... worrying is what I do best!


  7. #442
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    Kyle Griffin


    @kylegriffin1


    ·2h






    Trump does the ASEAN-way handshake (via AP).








  8. #443
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    Last edited by ShimmeringGlow; November 13th, 2017 at 01:10 AM.

  9. #444
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    Source: NY Times

    A London Meeting of an Unlikely Group: How a Trump Adviser Came to Learn of Clinton ‘Dirt’




    Joseph Mifsud, left, and Ivan Timofeev at an April 2016 conference in Moscow for the Valdai Discussion Club, a gathering of academics. Credit Valdai Club, via Associated Press
    WASHINGTON — At midday on March 24, 2016, an improbable group gathered in a London cafe to discuss setting up a meeting between Donald J. Trump, then a candidate, and President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia.


    There was George Papadopoulos, a 28-year-old from Chicago with an inflated résumé who just days earlier had been publicly named as a foreign policy adviser to Mr. Trump’s campaign. There was Joseph Mifsud, a Maltese academic in his mid-50s with a faltering career who boasted of having high-level contacts in the Russian government.


    And, perhaps most mysteriously, there was Olga Polonskaya, a 30-year-old Russian from St. Petersburg and the former manager of a wine distribution company. Mr. Mifsud introduced her to Mr. Papadopoulos as Mr. Putin’s niece, according to court papers. Mr. Putin has no niece.


    The interactions between the three players and a fourth man with contacts inside Russia’s Foreign Ministry have become a central part of the inquiry by the special prosecutor, Robert S. Mueller III, into the Kremlin’s efforts to interfere with the presidential election. Recently released court documents suggest that the F.B.I. suspected that some of the people who showed interest in Mr. Papadopoulos were participants in a Russian intelligence operation.


    The March 2016 meeting was followed by a breakfast the next month at a London hotel during which Mr. Mifsud revealed to Mr. Papadopoulos that the Russians had “dirt” on Hillary Clinton in the form of “thousands of emails.” That was months before the theft of a trove of emails from the Democratic National Committee by Russian-sponsored hackers became public.



    Mr. Mueller’s investigators are seeking to determine who — if anyone — in the Trump campaign Mr. Papadopoulos told about the stolen emails. Although there is no evidence that Mr. Papadopoulos emailed that information to the campaign, Mr. Papadopoulos was in regular contact that spring with top campaign officials, including Stephen Miller, now a senior adviser to President Trump, according to interviews and campaign documents reviewed by The New York Times.


    The revelations about Mr. Papadopoulos’s activities are part of a series of disclosures in the past two weeks about communications between Trump campaign advisers and Russian officials or self-described intermediaries for the Russian government. Taken together, they show not only that the contacts were more extensive than previously known, but also that senior campaign officials were aware of them.


    Last week, Carter Page, another former foreign policy adviser to the campaign, acknowledged to the House Intelligence Committee that he also had a private conversation with a Russian deputy prime minister on a trip to Moscow in July 2016. Mr. Page, who had previously denied meeting any Russian officials during the trip, said that he had informed at least four campaign officials about his trip beforehand and notified the campaign afterward that the Russian minister had pledged “strong support for Mr. Trump.”


    Publicly, Mr. Trump and former campaign officials have tried to distance themselves from Mr. Papadopoulos. Although he once praised him as an “excellent guy,” Mr. Trump posted on Twitter that “few people knew the young, low level volunteer named George, who has already proven to be a liar.” Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House spokeswoman, said his involvement in the campaign was “extremely limited.”


    But records and interviews show that in spring 2016, Mr. Papadopoulos was welcomed into the thinly-staffed campaign as a “surrogate” who could articulate the candidate’s views. He even helped edit a major foreign policy speech that Mr. Trump gave in Washington in late April, records indicate.


    The day before he learned about the hacked emails, Mr. Papadopoulos emailed Mr. Miller, then a senior policy adviser to the campaign, saying Mr. Trump had an “open invitation” from Mr. Putin to visit Russia. The day after, he wrote Mr. Miller that he had “some interesting messages coming in from Moscow about a trip when the time is right.”


    Those emails were described in court papers unsealed Oct. 30 disclosing that Mr. Papadopoulos had pleaded guilty to lying about his contacts to the F.B.I. But the documents did not identify Mr. Miller by name, citing only a “senior policy adviser.” Neither he nor his lawyer responded on Friday to requests for comment.


    During interviews with Mr. Mueller’s investigators, former campaign officials now working at the White House have denied having advance knowledge of the stolen emails, according to an official familiar with those discussions. Mr. Miller was among those recently interviewed.


    Mr. Mifsud’s interest in Mr. Papadopoulos began only after Mr. Papadopoulos had joined the Trump campaign, according to documents released by Mr. Mueller. Mr. Papadopoulos was living in London at the time, hoping to land a full-time job with the campaign, and possibly in a future Trump administration.


    Stocky and with a receding hairline, Mr. Mifsud boasted of his Russian connections to Mr. Papadopoulos and others. But in interviews, numerous Russia scholars in London and elsewhere said they had never heard of him, and his career had been rocky for years. He had served as the director of two different European institutions with grandiose names but no accreditation, and he had left two jobs dogged by suggestions of financial impropriety.


    “I remember him as a snake-oil salesman,” recalled Manuel Delia, a former Maltese government official who first encountered him in the late 1990s when Mr. Mifsud was administering a scholarship program. Later, Mr. Mifsud styled himself as an expert in international relations, landing a job in 2012 as director of the London Academy of Diplomacy, a for-profit continuing education program. By early 2016, that academy had shut down.



    A photograph shared on Twitter by President Trump showed a national security meeting in March 2016, during the presidential campaign. In attendance was George Papadopoulos, third from left. He did not exhibit any special interest or expertise in Russia until 2014, when his academy was beginning to stumble financially. It was at that time a 24-year-old Russian intern, Natalia Kutepova-Jamrom, turned up in his office with an improbably impressive résumé.


    Fluent in Russian, English, German and Chinese, Ms. Kutepova-Jamrom had worked in the Russian government as a legislative aide and would move on to a Russian state newspaper. Both Mr. Mifsud’s lawyer and Ms. Kutepova-Jamrom declined to comment. Mr. Mifsud did not respond to messages.


    Ms. Kutepova-Jamrom introduced Mr. Mifsud to senior Russian officials, diplomats and scholars. Despite Mr. Mifsud’s lack of qualifications, she managed to arrange an invitation for him to join the prestigious Valdai Discussion Club, an elite gathering of Western and Russian academics that meets each year with Mr. Putin.



    Mr. Mifsud’s inclusion in the group was “very, very strange,” said James Sherr, the former head of the Russian studies program at Chatham House in London and a member of Valdai for nearly a decade. It “might suggest he does have connections,” Mr. Sherr said.


    Mr. Mifsud suddenly became a popular pundit with state-run news outlets in Russia, praising the country and Mr. Putin. At his first Valdai conference in 2014, he argued against Western sanctions that punished Russia for its annexation of Crimea that year.


    “Global security and economy needs partners, and who is better in this than the Russian Federation,” he said.


    Among Mr. Mifsud’s most important new contacts was Ivan Timofeev, a graduate of the elite Moscow State Institute of International Relations and a program director for the Valdai conference. Mr. Mifsud would eventually introduce Mr. Timofeev to Mr. Papadopoulos by email in April 2016, and the two men communicated for months about possible meetings between the Trump campaign and Russian government officials.


    During those exchanges, Mr. Timofeev referred repeatedly to his contacts in Russia’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, court records show.|


    Reached by phone, Mr. Timofeev declined to comment on his relationships with Mr. Mifsud or Mr. Papadopoulos. But in an interview with the online news website Gazeta.ru in August, he acknowledged corresponding with Mr. Papadopoulos.|


    “At some point, he started asking whether it would be possible to set up a meeting between Trump and Putin or some other high-ranking Russian politicians,” Mr. Timofeev said at the time. “Our conversations made it clear that George was not well acquainted with the Russian foreign political landscape. You obviously can’t just go and set up a meeting with the president, for instance. Things just aren’t done that way.”


    Exactly how Mr. Mifsud first met Ms. Polonskaya, the Russian woman who attended the London cafe meeting in March 2016, is unclear.


    In a recent interview with the Italian newspaper La Repubblica, Mr. Mifsud said the Russian woman who met Mr. Papadopoulos was “a simple student, very beautiful.” He suggested Mr. Papadopoulos hoped for a romantic involvement, adding, “Putin had nothing to do with it, a lovely invention.”


    Mr. Mifsud did not reveal her name in that interview — and court records do not identify her — but The Times identified her through emails, interviews and other records.


    Ms. Polonskaya did not respond to emails from The Times this week. After Politico identified her on Thursday by her maiden name, Vinogradova, her brother, Sergei Vinogradov, spoke to The Times on her behalf.


    He said she was in London discussing a possible internship with Mr. Mifsud, a friend of hers, the morning before the meeting with Mr. Papadopoulos. He insisted that she had no connections to the Russian government and never portrayed herself as Mr. Putin’s niece, despite the court records unsealed by Mr. Mueller.


    He said that she only exchanged pleasantries with Mr. Papadopoulos, and that she understood only about half of the discussion between Mr. Mifsud and Mr. Papadopoulos. He shared a text message from her in which she explained to him the reason: “Because my English was bad,” it read.


    “It’s totally ridiculous,” Mr. Vinogradov said. “She’s not interested in politics. She can barely tell the difference between Lenin and Stalin.”

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  10. #445
    Elite Member pinkbunnyslippers's Avatar
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    Look how he was struggling to shake hands. I️ hope they pulled his arms tight.
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  11. #446
    Elite Member ShimmeringGlow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkbunnyslippers View Post
    Look how he was struggling to shake hands. I️ hope they pulled his arms tight.
    Haha...the photographer Doug Mills is a pool reporter that tweeted a black box on Saturday as a part of their coverage of an event that they were left standing around in the road outside of the venue. The WH pool of reporters had been only allowed in a few minutes yesterday. People are upset about the shot. So what.

  12. #447
    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkbunnyslippers View Post
    Look how he was struggling to shake hands. I️ hope they pulled his arms tight.
    So, aside from tiny hands, he also has short arms? Or is he simply too fat?
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    Warren Beatty: actor, director, writer, producer.

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  13. #448
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkbunnyslippers View Post
    Look how he was struggling to shake hands. I️ hope they pulled his arms tight.
    Anything to focus the attention on himself. ANYTHING.
    Life is short. Break the Rules. Forgive Quickly. Kiss Slowly. Love Truly.
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  14. #449
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    Guess what this is a photo of?


  15. #450
    Elite Member Annie B's Avatar
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    ^^Is this set up for Gloria Allred bringing out the next "I was molested/assaulted while underage by Roy Moore" accuser?

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