Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 26 of 26

Thread: The inhumane conditions of Bradley Manning's detention

  1. #16
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    5,543

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MohandasKGanja View Post
    As far as I understand habeus corpus was not suspended for Manning because he is actually charged under the uniform code of military justice with violation of Articles 92 and 134, which regard the use or transfer of classified data.
    If you are going to compare Manning to Ames and Pollard, then he deserves the same public hearings they got to establish bail...or not.

    We know nothing about Manning.
    CHILLY FREE!
    i have to zero the contain to your level -bugdoll
    you can't even be ogirinal - Mary

  2. #17
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    34,417

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by olivia View Post
    If you are going to compare Manning to Ames and Pollard, then he deserves the same public hearings they got to establish bail...or not.

    We know nothing about Manning.
    I agree we know very little about Manning. The chances are that the military knows a lot, but wants to know more. I doubt is trial is going to move forward until they are satisfied that they know exactly what he released and to whom.

    As far as public hearings, I'm not sure that Manning has that right. Ames and Pollard were both civilian personnel and not military, which has its own procedures and codes.

  3. #18
    Elite Member stef's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    germany
    Posts
    11,756

    Default

    For 23 out of 24 hours every day -- for seven straight months and counting -- he sits completely alone in his cell. Even inside his cell, his activities are heavily restricted; he's barred even from exercising and is under constant surveillance to enforce those restrictions. For reasons that appear completely punitive, he's being denied many of the most basic attributes of civilized imprisonment, including even a pillow or sheets for his bed (he is not and never has been on suicide watch). For the one hour per day when he is freed from this isolation, he is barred from accessing any news or current events programs.
    this is making me sick.
    and it's also making me sick that i've never heard a thing about him on the news. i guess it's not worth reporting.
    "This is not meant to be at all offensive: You suffer from diarrhea of the mouth but constipation of the brain." - McJag

  4. #19
    Elite Member witchcurlgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Acerbia
    Posts
    34,697

    Default

    Bradley Manning, who allegedly leaked hundreds of thousands of secret government documents to Julian Assange’s WikiLeaks, turns 23 in jail Friday. The Daily Beast’s Denver Nicks, in an exclusive interview with Manning’s attorney, reports on his solitary confinement, what he’s reading (from George W. Bush to Howard Zinn), and his legal strategy.

    The last time Bradley Manning saw the world outside of a jail, most Americans had never heard of WikiLeaks. On Friday, Manning, the man whose alleged unauthorized release of hundreds of thousands of classified documents put the website and its controversial leader, Julian Assange, on the map, turns 23 behind bars. Since his arrest in May, Manning has spent most of his 200-plus days in solitary confinement. Other than receiving a card and some books from his family, his birthday will be no different. In an exclusive interview with The Daily Beast, his attorney, David Coombs, revealed key details about Manning’s imprisonment and kind gestures from his family that provided a bit of comfort in the inmate's otherwise extremely harsh incarceration.

    “They’re thinking about him on his birthday, that they love and support him,” Coombs said of Manning's family and the card his mother, father, sister and aunt passed along via the lawyer on Wednesday. “They wish they could be with him on his day, but they are not allowed because visitation is only on Saturday and Sunday, and a family member would be going down to see him on Saturday.” Coombs passed a message to Manning from his aunt on behalf of the family; Manning, the lawyer says, asked Coombs to tell his aunt he loved her and wishes he could be with her as well.

    Manning asked for a list of books, which his family bought for him and will be delivered over the next few weeks to coincide with his birthday and Christmas. On the list?

    Decision Points, by George W. Bush
    Critique of Practical Reason, by Immanuel Kant
    Critique of Pure Reason, by Immanuel Kant • Propaganda, by Edward Bernayse
    The Selfish Gene, by Richard Dawkins
    A People’s History of the United States, by Howard Zinn
    The Art of War, by Sun Tzu
    The Good Soldiers, by David Finkel
    On War by Gen. Carl von Clausewitz

    Manning is being held at Marine Corps Base Quantico, in Virginia. He spends 23 hours a day alone in a standard-sized cell, with a sink, a toilet, and a bed. He isn’t allowed sheets or a pillow, though First Lieutenant Brian Villiard, an officer at Quantico, said he is allowed bedding of “non-shreddable” material. “I’ve held it, I’ve felt it, it’s soft, I’d sleep under it,” he told The Daily Beast.

    He isn’t allowed to exercise (Quantico officials dispute this), but he has started stretching and practicing yoga.

    For an hour every day, a television is wheeled in front of his cell and he’s allowed to watch TV, including news, though usually local news, Coombs told The Daily Beast. He is allowed to read the news as well. Courtesy of Coombs, Manning now has a subscription to his favorite magazine, Scientific American. The November “Hidden Worlds of Dark Matter” issue was his first.

    The conditions under which Bradley Manning is being held would traumatize anyone (see Salon’s Glenn Greenwald for a rundown of the legal and psychological issues associated with extended solitary confinement. He lives alone in a small cell, denied human contact. He is forced to wear shackles when outside of his cell, and when he meets with the few people allowed to visit him, they sit with a glass partition between them. The only person other than prison officials and a psychologist who has spoken to Manning face to face is his attorney, who says the extended isolation—now more than seven months of solitary confinement—is weighing on his client’s psyche.

    When he was first arrested, Manning was put on suicide watch, but his status was quickly changed to “Prevention of Injury” watch (POI), and under this lesser pretense he has been forced into his life of mind-numbing tedium. His treatment is harsh, punitive and taking its toll, says Coombs.

    “The command is basing this treatment of him solely on the nature of the pending charges, and on an unrelated incident where a service member in the facility took his own life,” Coombs said, referencing the February suicide of a marine captain in the Quantico brig.

    Coombs says he believes Quantico officials are keeping Manning under close watch with strict limitations on his activity out of an overabundance of caution. Both Coombs and Manning’s psychologist, Coombs says, are sure Manning is mentally healthy, that there is no evidence he’s a threat to himself, and shouldn’t be held in such severe conditions under the artifice of his own protection.

    Manning faces a military court-martial on charges of providing WikiLeaks with classified information in violation of the Uniform Code of Military Justice. "It is much too early for any plea decision," Coombs told The Daily Beast.

    His future remains uncertain. Rep John Conyers (D-MI), in Thursday's congressional hearing on WikiLeaks, called for calm and a measured response to the new challenges the whistleblower's site presents to the future of governance. "When everyone in this town is joined together calling for someone's head, it's a pretty sure sign that we need to slow down and take a look."

    Rep. Ted Poe (R-TX) followed with a call for punishment. “I have no sympathy for the alleged thief in this situation,” Poe said, insisting the source of the leak, whoever it is, be held responsible. “He’s no better than a Texas pawn shop dealer that deals in stolen merchandise and sells it to the highest bidder.”

    Manning’s fate will be determined over the following months. What is clear today is that he’s being held in extraordinarily harsh conditions—notably harsher than Bryan Minkyu Martin, the naval intelligence specialist who allegedly tried to sell military secrets to an undercover FBI agent, and is currently being held awaiting trial, though not in solitary confinement. Manning, who has been convicted of nothing, has spent the better part of a year incommunicado, living the life of a man convicted of a heinous crime. Coombs challenges the legality of what he says is “unlawful pretrial punishment.” He is working to lift the POI restrictions placed on his client.

    Bradley Manning: WikiLeaks Alleged Source



    All of God's children are not beautiful. Most of God's children are, in fact, barely presentable.


    If I wanted the government in my womb I'd fuck a Senator

  5. #20
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    5,543

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MohandasKGanja View Post

    As far as public hearings, I'm not sure that Manning has that right. Ames and Pollard were both civilian personnel and not military, which has its own procedures and codes.

    Which makes any comparison between them sort of silly.

    Being held in 24 solitary in basically a sensory deprivation tank, where he isn't allowed to exercise, is a punitive sentence before any sort of trial and conviction, no? Where is the risk of re-offense while in the general population or even maximum security?

    Even if the military claims that they don't want to run the risk of Manning passing on any information to another source, his conditions smack of some Tower of London shit that vengeful kings used to pull.

    Yep, more and more of our government and military is being allowed to wreak havoc in secret without criticism.
    CHILLY FREE!
    i have to zero the contain to your level -bugdoll
    you can't even be ogirinal - Mary

  6. #21
    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    In WhoreLand fucking your MOM
    Posts
    55,359

    Default

    Not to mention he's being drugged against his will, anti depressants to counter the psychosis inducing solitary confinement
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

  7. #22
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    34,417

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by olivia View Post
    Which makes any comparison between them sort of silly.

    Being held in 24 solitary in basically a sensory deprivation tank, where he isn't allowed to exercise, is a punitive sentence before any sort of trial and conviction, no? Where is the risk of re-offense while in the general population or even maximum security?

    Even if the military claims that they don't want to run the risk of Manning passing on any information to another source, his conditions smack of some Tower of London shit that vengeful kings used to pull.
    From what I'm reading there is already precedent for someone in the military contesting their solitary confinement (in Avila's case, 441 days of it - 140 days of those were pre-trial), and having the motion dismissed. Below is a summary of the case:

    In United States v. Jose D. AVILA, Jr., Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps (http://www.armfor.uscourts.gov/opinions/2000Term/99-0399.htm), Avila, who was caught by Customs Agents with 60.5 pounds of marijuana, argued that experiencing 441 days in solitary confinement was cruel and unusual. The Court rejected this argument, giving the following reasoning: The Supreme Court has held that "[t]he Constitution does not mandate comfortable prisons, but neither does it permit inhumane ones."... In order to find a violation of the Eighth Amendment, two requirements must be met:

    First, the deprivation alleged must be, objectively, "sufficiently serious"; a prison official’s act or omission must result in the denial of "the minimal civilized measure of life’s necessities."...

    The second requirement follows from the principle that "only the unnecessary and wanton infliction of pain implicates the Eighth Amendment." To violate the Cruel and Unusual Punishments Clause, a prison official must have a "sufficiently culpable state of mind." In prison-conditions cases, that state of mind is one of "deliberate indifference" to inmate health or safety...

    Conditions the Supreme Court has found to violate the Eighth Amendment include the deprivation of medical treatment and "deliberate indifference to serious medical needs"; the use of excessive force against inmates; and the failure to provide sufficient food, sanitary housing, and safety from beatings or torture by other inmates or guards. This case does not involve similar treatment.

    Solitary confinement, per se, has not been held to violate the Cruel and Unusual Punishment Clause. Federal civilian courts have reviewed the specific conditions of solitary confinement to determine whether the confinement involved deprivation of basic needs or unnecessary infliction of pain. They have held that routine conditions associated with punitive or administrative segregation do not rise to the level of a deprivation of life’s necessities and violation of the Eighth Amendment. These conditions include restrictions or prohibitions on the opportunity to talk to other prisoners, exercise outside a cell, visitation privileges, telephone privileges, meal choices, and reading material...

  8. #23
    Elite Member MontanaMama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Evading P6 & P7
    Posts
    14,157

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by witchcurlgirl View Post
    And every thinking person knows that they invoke the state secrets canard to avoid embarrassing the government, not to protect real secrets.


    Why not just go the extra yard and label him an enemy of the state? That has a nice ring to it.
    Bristol? Is that you? I have never heard anyone use the word canard except the Palin facebook ghostwriters.

    7 months is far too long to go without any charges. However, our military courts have always worked very differently than civilian courts. Also, while I applaud WikiLeaks shining the light, this guy is accused of high treason. There's no bail hearing for that, there's generally a firing squad at dawn.
    If i hear one more personal attack, i will type while drunk, then you can cry! - Bugdoll
    (716): I'd call her a cunt, but she doesn't seem to have the depth or warmth
    Quote Originally Posted by shedevilang View Post
    (Replying to MontanaMama) This is some of the smartest shit I ever read

  9. #24
    Elite Member Penny Lane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Over the hills and far away
    Posts
    21,646

    Default

    That's seriously fucked up that they're giving him anti-depressants to keep the fall into full blown psychosis at bay. I wonder if they'll stop the drug treatment once this goes to trial just to make him seem even more unstable.

  10. #25
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    5,543

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaMama View Post
    Also, while I applaud WikiLeaks shining the light, this guy is accused of high treason. There's no bail hearing for that, there's generally a firing squad at dawn.
    Since when? The last soldier executed for anything was Eddie Slovik in 1945.
    CHILLY FREE!
    i have to zero the contain to your level -bugdoll
    you can't even be ogirinal - Mary

  11. #26
    Gold Member Janet296's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    928

    Default

    You guys are forgetting he still in the military. He falls under UCMJ. The treatment that civilians get when in jail is very different compared to the military jails. Being locked up for 23 hours a day is common in military prisons. When he gets to leavenworth, he can expect more of the same.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. More than 200 dogs in 'cramped, filthy' conditions
    By misrule in forum Pets and Animals
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: September 12th, 2009, 08:13 AM
  2. America's inhumane immigration inequality
    By Fluffy in forum U.S. Politics and Issues
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: March 17th, 2009, 08:22 AM
  3. Replies: 64
    Last Post: February 9th, 2009, 10:23 PM
  4. Replies: 24
    Last Post: July 9th, 2006, 08:37 PM
  5. Replies: 10
    Last Post: June 21st, 2006, 09:23 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •