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Thread: For Californians: Prop. 8 winning

  1. #16
    Elite Member mrs.v's Avatar
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    eat a hot bowl of dicks.

  2. #17
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    From SF gate Choice Votes % Yes 1,997,288 53.0% No 1,768,392 47.0% 24% of precincts reporting Updated 11/04 10:00PM I've been a long time lurker here and I just had to post because this has moved me to tears. What a great and horrible day for America. Your country has voted Obama...has voted for change. ...and yet there are those who would still see us back into the stone age. Words can't describe the deep pain this causes me...even tho i am straight it makes the pit of my stomach turn inside and out. Humanity never ever ceases to amaze and horrify.

  3. #18
    Elite Member DeadDwarf's Avatar
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    FUCK YOU, YOU FUCKING BIGOTS!

    I saw tons of "Yes on 8" signs everywhere. There would be like 10 signs, two feet from each other on the busy streets. The only "No on 8" signs I saw were HOMEMADE! Literally made with sharpies and stuck on chainlink fences. What the hell is going on?! Why the fuck are these nuts trying to make an amendment to ban gay marriage? What's next?! What about human rights and equality!!!!!!

    I voted against it and now I feel like "evil" won. This sucks and makes me so sad. I thought California was better than this, I really did!

  4. #19
    Elite Member Beeyotch's Avatar
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    I can't find the funding the No on 8 groups eventually got, but according to that Oct 22 LA Weekly article, the Yes on 8 groups had raised around $26 million. And No on 8 groups were lagging at that time, the article was about how people who were expected to be big contributors to the No on 8 cause (wealthy Hollywood industry players) were not donating as expected to the cause.

    Riding the Cultural Divide with Proposition 8 - News - LA Weeklypage 5 - LA Weekly

    Here I found this from a Nov. 5 Wall Street Journal article:

    The amount of money raised-- $38 million to support gay marriage and more than $32 million to ban it -- has fueled a fierce campaign marked by rallies, boycotts, celebrity endorsements and a constant rotation of television ads on both sides.
    Looks like eventually they did get more funding than the Yes on 8 groups. Hmm. Must have been too little, too late.

  5. #20
    Gold Member Corsair's Avatar
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    I thought California was better than this, I really did!

    DeadDwarf I feel the same way. I happen to attend "that college" where the student government voted to support prop 8. I voted no but the "yes" people were literally on every street corner this past week.
    Don't worry about what other people think. They don't do it very often.

  6. #21
    Elite Member Shinola's Avatar
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    As a Californian (by transplant, but still), I am embarrassed by this shit.

    This is like war on gay people. Not just in California, but across the U.S. The Supreme Court is going to have to end up fixing this mess.

    So make your appointments carefully, Obama. Everyone deserves basic rights in this nation.
    Posted from my fucking iPhone

  7. #22
    Elite Member greysfang's Avatar
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    What pisses me off is that gay is the new black. Please tell me what Prop 8 is other than a re-worded Jim Crow law?
    FUCK YOU AND GIVE ME MY GODDAMN VENTI TWO PUMP LIGHT WHIP MOCHA YOU COCKSUCKING WHORE BEFORE I PUNCH YOU IN THE MOUTH. I just get unpleasant in my car. - Deej

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  8. #23
    Gold Member ymeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shinola View Post
    As a Californian (by transplant, but still), I am embarrassed by this shit.

    This is like war on gay people. Not just in California, but across the U.S. The Supreme Court is going to have to end up fixing this mess.

    So make your appointments carefully, Obama. Everyone deserves basic rights in this nation.

    I agree, this is complete bullshit, it's like giving vasectomy to the states or something. It's time to reinforce the bill of rights, either we have equal rights under the constitution or we don't.

  9. #24
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    how is it going?

  10. #25
    Elite Member *DIVA!'s Avatar
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    In Arkansas they banned gay people from adopting.
    In Florida they banned gay marriage.

    they banned it someplace else today also..seriously fucking sick..
    Baltimore O's ​Fan!

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  11. #26
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    They are saying it's too close as of yet to call. I was disheartened to read that exit polls showed that proposition 8 is ahead among Black voters.

    Nation watches as a divided California votes on same-sex marriage - Los Angeles Times

    Supporters and opponents have mounted a costly campaign over Proposition 8, which would amend state Constitution to ban gay marriage.
    By Jessica Garrison and Cara Mia DiMassa
    8:41 PM PST, November 4, 2008
    A measure to ban gay marriage was leading in early returns primarily from conservative counties but exit polls showed the race as too close to call.

    Proposition 8 would amend the California Constitution to define marriage as only between a man and a woman. Exit poll data showed that Democrats and independents were tending to vote against Proposition 8, while Republicans were in favor of the measure.


    The proposition was trailing among white voters, but was ahead among black voters. Latino voters were closely divided.

    People who said they attended religious services weekly were overwhelmingly voting for the measure, while those who said that they occasionally or never went to religious services were voting no.

    Voters older than 65 voted mostly for the proposition, while those in the 18-29 range voted against it.

    Recent polling has shown the race to be extremely close, and that divide was reflected at polling places throughout Southern California today.

    Colleen Cross, 53, principal of Garden Grove High School, said that in addition to voting for the presidential ticket of John McCain and Sarah Palin she was eager to vote for Proposition 8.

    "I'm conservative, and family values are important to me. I see the country taking a real liberal swing and it scares me to death," Cross said. "The moral center has moved so far left that I can hardly recognize my country anymore."

    Mark Lescroart, a neuroscience grad student at USC, went to his Silver Lake polling place this morning to vote for Barack Obama and against Proposition 8, which he called "a basic civil rights issue."

    "I am a little bit sad it even got on the ballot in the first place," he said.

    Along with the presidential race, the fight over gay marriage is among nation's most closely watched contests. Volunteers from around the country have staffed phone banks, and campaign contributions have come from every state in the nation to the "no" campaign, and every state but Vermont to the "yes" side.

    The two sides raised nearly $74 million and blanketed the airwaves for weeks with expensive television and radio commercials.

    The battle also has been waged on street corners and front lawns, from the pulpits of churches and synagogues and -- unusual for a fight over a social issue -- in the boardrooms of many of the state's largest corporations.

    Most of the state's highest-profile political leaders -- including both U.S. senators and the mayors of San Francisco, San Diego and Los Angeles -- along with the editorial pages of most major newspapers, have opposed the measure. PG&E, Apple and other companies contributed money to fight the proposition, and the heads of Silicon Valley companies including Google and Yahoo took out a newspaper ad opposing it.

    Many argued, as former President Clinton did in a taped call to millions of registered voters in the days before the election, that the measure was discriminatory because it would strip rights from gay couples and treat them differently from heterosexual couples.

    "If I know one thing about California, I know that is not what you're about. That is not what America is about. Please vote "no" on 8. It's unfair and it's wrong," Clinton said.

    At some polling places Tuesday, Proposition 8 opponents handed out cards to voters. "The polls show there are still about 10% of our voters who are confused about which is yes and which is no," said a volunteer at a polling place near Pico Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue. "That could make a difference."

    On the other side have been an array of conservative organizations, including the Knights of Columbus, Focus on the Family and the American Family Assn., along with tens of thousands of small donors, including many who responded to urging from Mormon, Catholic and evangelical clergy. An early October filing by the "yes" campaign reported so many contributions that the secretary of state's campaign finance website crashed.

    Proponents also organized a massive grass-roots effort. Campaign officials said they distributed more than 1.1 million lawn signs for Proposition 8 -- although an effort to stage a massive, simultaneous lawn-sign planting in late September failed after production problems in China delayed hundreds of thousands of signs.

    For weeks before the election, thousands of volunteers also gathered on street corners around the state waving "Yes on 8" banners -- often squaring off against "No on 8" volunteers on opposite corners.

    Research and polling showed that many voters were against gay marriage, but afraid that saying so would make them seem "discriminatory" or "not cool," said Jeff Flint, a campaign strategist for Proposition 8, so proponents hoped to show them they were not alone.

    Perhaps more powerfully, the Proposition 8 campaign also seized on the issue of education, arguing in a series of advertisements and mailers that children would be subjected to a pro-gay curriculum if the measure was not approved.

    "Mom, guess what I learned in school today?" a little girl said in one spot. "I learned how a prince married a prince."

    As the girl's mother made a horrified face, a voice-over said: "Think it can't happen? It's already happened. . . . Teaching about gay marriage will happen unless we pass Proposition 8."

    The "no" side countered with ads that included state Supt. of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell saying the proposition had nothing to do with schools, and that "schools aren't required to teach anything about marriage."

    At polling places Tuesday, people on both sides of the issue said they thought about children when deciding how to vote.

    First-time voter Mike Johnson, 22, said at his Baldwin Hills precinct that he's voting for Obama but yes on Proposition 8, in part because of "when I have kids," he said. "If it's not right in the Bible, it's not right in society."

    In South Pasadena, bankruptcy lawyer Leonard Pena said his voting this year was driven by his 21-month-old daughter. "Her future is really important to me," he said. "Our country deserves something different."

    Even though he and his girlfriend haven't gotten married, Pena said, he believes that people should be able to marry whomever they want.

    "I really think it's more about love than marriage," he said. "Marriage isn't that important to me, but it may be to some people."

    At Lincoln Avenue Baptist Church in Pasadena, Christy Gottardi left the polls with her 18-month-old son, Finn Moision, on her hip. She had voted no on Proposition 8, saying it was the single issue that she had received calls about "from a live person," though she had already made up her mind that "it's a really crazy thing to take away people's rights."

    Voter Joney Manley said her opposition to gay marriage "goes back to my religious beliefs. I don't believe Jesus was high on it," she said. "It's not against the individual, but their lifestyle."

    Manley said she had seen "No on 8" commercials with Ellen DeGeneres, but they didn't sway her. "I still love her," she said of DeGeneres. "I'm not against her. But I'm against the institution."

    Steven Monroe and Melanie Monroe high-fived each other as they stepped out of their polling place at Plummer Park in West Hollywood an hour after they arrived. The couple had brought along their son, Finch, who was tucked away in a Baby Bjorn, to witness their historic vote. But Finch, said Melanie Monroe, "slept through the whole thing."

    Melanie Monroe said she had voted against Proposition 8. It was one of her most important votes, she said.

    "We think everybody has the right to be married," she said, "with all the rights, problems and drama that entails. It shouldn't be the standard definition. Marriage is two people committed to each other."

  12. #27
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    How is this allowed to be voted on? Isn't this a civil rights issue? What if this is how we allowed school segregation to be handled? I'm not understanding this proposition at all.

    Its unconstituional isn't it?

  13. #28
    Elite Member Beeyotch's Avatar
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    I hope this goes to the Supreme Court. It is unconstitutional and eventually I hope it will be ruled as such sooner rather than later.

  14. #29
    Elite Member DeadDwarf's Avatar
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    ^ I think it's unconstitutional as well and yes, the Supreme Court needs to bring that shit down ASAP! And then we need to go bitchslap every fucking bigot that voted to ban gay marriage.

    I am still pissed! I am shocked. I mean even my husband's co-worker, who comes from an ultra conservative background regarding gays, voted against Prop 8. He and my husband were carpooling all week and kept honking at the people on the streets holding "equality for gays" signs. His co-worker was cheering them and waving out of the window. My husband was surprised by it because his co-worker is not outspoken about gay rights. And when he asked him about it, he said it didn't seem right to not give them the same rights.

    So if people like this guy voted against the ban, who the hell were voting for it?! Do we have fundies hiding amongst us?

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by celeb_2006 View Post
    They are saying it's too close as of yet to call. I was disheartened to read that exit polls showed that proposition 8 is ahead among Black voters.
    According to exit polling, 70% of black voters voted for the proposition I think that will push the support for the proposal over-the-top (51% of Latino voters and 47% of white voters supported the proposal.) Apparently, not even California is liberal enough for voters to keep gay marriage legal.

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