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Thread: Bush to criminalize protesters under Patriot Act as "disruptors"

  1. #16
    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bush to criminalize protesters under Patriot Act as "disruptors"

    Please God somebody k**l that bastard!

  2. #17
    Hit By Ban Bus! ediebrooks's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bush to criminalize protesters under Patriot Act as "disruptors"

    Someone needs to criminalize Bush. He's an asshole.

  3. #18
    Elite Member NawdleZouss's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bush to criminalize protesters under Patriot Act as "disruptors"

    To all the people living in the U.S....RUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU UUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUN!
    2 years...

  4. #19
    Elite Member Mr. Authority's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bush to criminalize protesters under Patriot Act as "disruptors"

    ^
    I would, but that would mean letting the Bushites win, and I ain't gonna let that happen.

    As far as this crimilization Bush wants to put on us protestors, he's gonna have a hell of a fight because we'll use our right to kick his sorry hick ass outta Washington.

  5. #20
    Elite Member Glasgow53's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bush to criminalize protesters under Patriot Act as "disruptors"

    I learned a long time ago it is my right and my duty to protest things which I think aren't right, an no politician has any right to try to take that from me. If he does, he will go first.
    Keep passing the open windows.

  6. #21
    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bush to criminalize protesters under Patriot Act as "disruptors"

    Good luck with that one. 2nd ammendment anybody? lol
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

  7. #22
    Elite Member Glasgow53's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bush to criminalize protesters under Patriot Act as "disruptors"

    I can at least try. It helps me sleep at night.
    Keep passing the open windows.

  8. #23
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! buttmunch's Avatar
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    Default Patriot Act provision would turn protestors into felons.

    WASHINGTON A new provision tucked into the Patriot Act bill now before Congress would allow authorities to haul demonstrators at any "special event of national significance" away to jail on felony charges if they are caught breaching a security perimeter.

    Sen. Arlen Specter , R-Pa., chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, sponsored the measure, which would extend the authority of the Secret Service to allow agents to arrest people who willingly or knowingly enter a restricted area at an event, even if the president or other official normally protected by the Secret Service isn't in attendance at the time.

    The measure has civil libertarians protesting what they say is yet another power grab for the executive branch and one more loss for free speech.

    "It's definitely problematic and chilling," said Lisa Graves, senior counsel for legislative strategy at the American Civil Liberties Union , which has written letters to the chairmen and ranking members of the House and Senate Judiciary Committees, pointing out that the provision wasn't subject to hearings or open debate.

    Some conservatives say they too are troubled by the measure.

    "It concerns me greatly," said Bob Barr, former U.S. prosecutor and Republican representative from Georgia. "It clearly raises serious concerns about First Amendment rights."

    But not everyone agrees that rights are being trampled on by the additional provision. In fact, some say the ACLU is the problem when it comes to protecting national security.

    Rocco DiPippo, a freelance writer for the conservative FrontPageMagazine.com and editor of The Autonomist Web log , said the ACLU has fought the government every step of the way over security measures following the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks.

    "Its opposition to Specter's reasonable proposal is simply more of the same," he said. "I can understand the concern that we should be suspicious of government, but we shouldn't adopt this mindset: 'government is evil.' This is just more hatred of (President) Bush."

    Under current law, the Secret Service can arrest anyone for breaching restricted areas where the president or a protected official is or will be visiting, but the new provision would allow such arrests even after those VIPs have left the premises of any designated "special event of national significance." The provision would increase the maximum penalty for such an infraction from six months to one year in jail.

    In a post-Sept. 11 world many non-political events have been designated National Special Security Events and would rise to the higher status. Examples of possible NSSEs are the Olympics or the Super Bowl. In 2004, the presidential inaugural balls and President Ronald Reagan's June funeral procession in Washington, D.C., were designated NSSEs.

    According to government sources with knowledge of the legislation, Secret Service protection and law enforcement authority would extend beyond protecting a specific person, rather the event itself would become the "protectee."

    Currently, non-violent demonstrators who enter restricted areas at such events previously would be arrested and charged by local law enforcement with simple trespassing, said Graves. Under the provision included in the new law, they will be charged with felonies by the Secret Service.

    "It's a different consequence to people," she said.

    "You are talking about giving the executive branch broader authority to create these exclusion zones which could cover broad areas and last for days [during an event ]," David Kopel, a constitutional expert with the Cato Institute, told FOXNews.com.

    A spokesman at Specter's office said the senator was surprised by the clamor over the provision, which merely makes a technical change to clear up legal confusion over who has arresting authority at NSSEs. His office had no further comment on the provision. Committee Ranking Member Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., also declined comment. Republican and Democratic House Judiciary Committee leaders did not return calls for comment.

    White House sources say the measure was not instigated by the administration and pointed out that it was a stand-alone bill that was rolled into the Patriot Act by Specter's office during House-Senate conference negotiations. White House spokeswoman Dana Perino told FOXNews.com that the White House would not comment on the intent of the measure, but that the president is concerned with preserving individual rights.

    "President Bush is committed to protecting the American people's national security as well as their civil liberties," she said.

    Secret Service representatives said the agency does not comment on pending legislation.

    The Bush administration has been criticized in the past for what many say are tactics that keep protesters far away from official events and by employing stringent policies to ensure favorable audiences for the president.

    Last year, three ticket-holding audience members at one of the president's Social Security events in Denver, Colo., were apprehended by a man who they said identified himself as Secret Service. The three were forced away from the event because of an anti-war sticker on the driver's car.

    "[The administration] has certainly demonstrated a desire to have carefully-controlled events," said Graves.

    John Pike, director of GlobalSecurity.org, an Alexandria, Va.-based clearinghouse for domestic and international security information, said he "could certainly understand why the Secret Service would want that legal authority," given the enormous burden of making venues safe for VIPs today.

    "However, I think many people have concluded that the way it is being used has nothing to do with protecting the president from Usama bin Laden and everything to do with suppressing dissent and making sure the protesters don't get on TV," Pike said.

    Bush is not the first president to flex his authority in this area, said Kopel, who pointed out that beginning with Reagan, presidents have created a larger security bubble and greater distance between themselves and dissenters at public events. The 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States just intensified the situation, he said.

    "I think the concerns about free speech in areas where the president is speaking long pre-date Bush. They were an issue in the Clinton administration, the first Bush administration and began as an issue during Reagan," Kopel said. "I do think the ACLU has legitimate concerns about the breadth of the new language and how it could be applied."

    Graves points out that conservative "pro-life" groups will be the target of the new provisions, too, a scenario that could raise the concerns for those who are typically critical of the ACLU, which she said is necessarily concerned about other provisions in the bill that impinge on civil liberties.

    House and Senate leaders, who return to Capitol Hill this week, are trying to renew the Patriot Act by Friday. Democrats and four Republicans in the Senate who filibustered a final vote in December after raising concerns about preserving civil liberties instituted a short-term extension of the previous bill, which was set to expire on Dec. 31.

    foxnews.com
    Note that this comes from Fox, so the spin is evident. What really makes me angry is that the Patriot Act would have made so many of the early protestors (Boston Tea Party, anyone?) into felons. Americans have the right to protest and although politicians don't wwant to hear about it, that's tough shit. I can't wait until the first person gets arrested, takes it to court and hopefully sees this bullshit found unconstitutional.
    'Those who sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.' Ben Franklin

    "When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying the cross."
    --Sinclair Lewis

  9. #24
    Elite Member olivia720's Avatar
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    Default Re: Patriot Act provision would turn protestors into felons.

    i hope this doesnt come to pass. Im counting the days till bush is out of office.

  10. #25
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! buttmunch's Avatar
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    Default Re: Patriot Act provision would turn protestors into felons.

    The sad thing is, once these things are in place, it's hard to turn back the clock.
    'Those who sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.' Ben Franklin

    "When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying the cross."
    --Sinclair Lewis

  11. #26
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! ourmaninBusan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Patriot Act provision would turn protestors into felons.

    ^^ I suspect the next administration will hum and haw their way
    out of cancelling the Patriot Act. It will forever be a stigma on
    W's reputation, but others, Republican and Democrat, will still
    take advantage of its provisions as it suits them.

    "President Bush is committed to protecting the American people's
    national security as well as their civil liberties," she said.
    He is failing on both counts. However, someone came to their
    senses late last year and cancelled mini-nuclear bunker bombs.
    Remember these? Bush wanted 5-kiloton bombs so that he
    could destroy mountain fortresses because those infamous
    15,000-lb. "daisy-cutter" bombs were surprisingly ineffective in Afghanistan.

    * To my knowledge, the 15,000-lb. bomb is one of the most powerful,
    if not the most powerful, conventional bomb we have. The only things
    capable of producing more force are nuclear weapons.

    ♫` ∴|| ~∞≠∝ ♫♪ $ -4C

  12. #27
    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
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    Default Re: Patriot Act provision would turn protestors into felons.

    erm, this was already posted in US politics..
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

  13. #28
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! buttmunch's Avatar
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    Default Re: Patriot Act provision would turn protestors into felons.

    When? It was just published today. Anyway, I think this is a way of cutting back on votes for the Dems. Remember, in most states, convicted felons are not allowed to vote. Sometimes, you gotta hand it to the repugs...they really are extra good at sneaky shit.
    'Those who sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.' Ben Franklin

    "When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying the cross."
    --Sinclair Lewis

  14. #29
    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
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    Default Re: Patriot Act provision would turn protestors into felons.

    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

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