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Thread: Barack Obama confronts racial division in U.S. in speech

  1. #16
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    He's smart. He knows that he cannot alienate the Black community by outright condemning what the pastor said. He only criticized his words. That he uses this tactic is somewhat sad but understandable because he needs to keep the vote and "keep it real." Ultimately though I think it is disappointing that Obama must keep "playing" all sides and appease everyone in order to stay in power and keep the vote. If I were a Black person I would be highly offended if people presumed that I thought the way people think a Black person should act. That is, that all Black people would automatically defend or embrace someone no matter how offensive or hateful simply because of the color of their skin.

    That to me is the ultimate racial division. All people no matter what race or color or other category need to fix the hatred and ignorance in their own groups before casting judgement or finding fault in others. But that's just me.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkdgirl View Post
    Yes, I know what they have said. And they were equally wrong. But they didn't sit in their church for 20 years with a man preaching hatred and then try to excuse obvious racial and religious rhetoric as misunderstood either.

    All the pretty words and casting of blame does not change the fact that he attended a church espousing racial divide, anti-Zionism and anti-Americanism... and didn't run the other way.

    How can anyone take him seriously if he can't even be the example he wants others to believe is possible?

    Anyone who attends a church that preaches hate- I don't care what color you are- run the other way.
    Let's be honest..I held my tongue because I didn't want to come off this way, but..never mind

    What the hell do some people have to be proud about when it comes to America! Slavery, being bought and sold, jim crow, segregation, hoses, dogs, hatred towards gays and lesbians, lynchings, james byrd, the tuskegee experiment, katrina, this illegal war, outing a cia agent, a liar as a president, reagonomics.. I can list MORE! You don't have to preach something to someone who have these memories, stories burned into their minds and hearts! But, some people can get past them, some can't..that's the truth of America..love it or hate it!
    I can also tell you that the fact that they have to decide every twenty years to allow black people the right to vote is fucking absurd to me! Why not make it permanent!?! The government is so quick to add an amendment banning gay marriage, why not an amendment that gives us the right to vote FOREVER!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSDiva View Post

    I can also tell you that the fact that they have to decide every twenty years to allow black people the right to vote is fucking absurd to me! Why not make it permanent!?! The government is so quick to add an amendment banning gay marriage, why not an amendment that gives us the right to vote FOREVER!!
    This an an internet hoax, perpetrated on those who do not know any better, or do any research.

    We do not have to decide every 20 to decide if blacks have the right to vote.

    The Fifteenth ammendment -passed right after the civil war-gives blacks the right to vote

    The confusion arises from the assumption that it's the Voting Rights Act alone which guarantees suffrage to minorities. In reality, all the Act does is keep in place a set of so-called "extraordinary remedies" meant to enforce the Fifteenth Amendment at state and local levels, where, in defiance of federal law, obstacles to the voting rights of black people were still in place in some parts of the country as of the early 1960s. These remedies, designed specifically to address problems that existed at the time, were never meant to be permanent, which is why the Voting Rights Act comes up for renewal every 25 years.
    It's no longer a dog whistle, it's a fucking trombone


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    Quote Originally Posted by witchcurlgirl View Post
    "I can no more disown him than I can disown the black community,"

    well I'm white and I can sure as fuck disown the white community when it's wrong
    I'm not even white yet I wouldn't do that. Why throw the baby out with the bath water?

    It was a good speech. For anyone that missed it:

    YouTube - Obama Speech: 'A More Perfect Union'

    Text of speech courtesy of USA Today (PDF)

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mamaste View Post
    I'm not even white yet I wouldn't do that. Why throw the baby out with the bath water?
    Hmmm...If they're wrong then you aren't throwing the baby out with the bathwater.
    It's no longer a dog whistle, it's a fucking trombone


    All of God's children are not beautiful. Most of God's children are, in fact, barely presentable.


    If I wanted the government in my womb I'd fuck a Senator

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by witchcurlgirl View Post
    This an an internet hoax, perpetrated on those who do not know any better, or do any research.

    We do not have to decide every 20 to decide if blacks have the right to vote.

    The Fifteenth ammendment -passed right after the civil war-gives blacks the right to vote

    The confusion arises from the assumption that it's the Voting Rights Act alone which guarantees suffrage to minorities. In reality, all the Act does is keep in place a set of so-called "extraordinary remedies" meant to enforce the Fifteenth Amendment at state and local levels, where, in defiance of federal law, obstacles to the voting rights of black people were still in place in some parts of the country as of the early 1960s. These remedies, designed specifically to address problems that existed at the time, were never meant to be permanent, which is why the Voting Rights Act comes up for renewal every 25 years.
    OOPS MY BAD 25 YEARS!!

    Maybe MSNBC brought into a hoax, also!
    Bush signs Voting Rights Act extension - Politics - MSNBC.com
    WASHINGTON - President Bush on Thursday signed legislation extending for 25 years the Voting Rights Act, the historic 1965 law which opened polls to millions of black Americans by outlawing racist voting practices in the South. "Congress has reaffirmed its belief that all men are created equal," he declared.Bush signed the bill amid fanfare and before an South Lawn audience that included members of Congress, civil rights leaders and family members of civil rights leaders of the recent past. It was one of a series of high-profile ceremonies the president is holding to sign popular bills into law.
    The Republican controlled Congress, eager to improve its standing with minorities ahead of the November elections, pushed the bill through even though key provisions were not set to expire until next year.
    "The right of ordinary men and women to determine their own political future lies at the heart of the American experiment," Bush said. He said the Voting Rights Act proposed and signed by then-President Lyndon Johnson in 1965 "broke the segregationist lock on the voting box."
    Later Thursday, Bush is to sign another bill sure to resonate with voters in this congressional election year: legislation establishing a national Internet database designed to let law enforcement and communities know where convicted sex offenders live and work.By contrast, Bush chose to exercise the first veto of his 51/2 years as president in privacy last week, with no audience, no cameras, no reporters. The bill he vetoed would have expanded federally funded research of embryonic stem cells, which is opposed by social conservatives but has wide support among the rest of the public.
    White House officials said an open ceremony to veto a bill seemed inappropriate, although other presidents have done just that. Forty minutes after the Oval Office veto, Bush gave a major address on the issue in the East Room, open to the press and surrounded by families who have "adopted" leftover frozen embryos and used them to bear children.
    In May, Bush took to the South Lawn to sign into law a bill that extended $70 billion in previously passed tax cuts. That package was also seen by Republicans as an opportunity to boost the popularity of the president and the Republican-controlled Congress
    The South Lawn is hardly a common venue for presidential bill-signings, which usually occur in an office building next to the White House or, for particularly important legislation, in the East Room. The majestic backyard of the White House is typically reserved for pomp-filled welcoming ceremonies for foreign leaders or large social affairs like the annual Easter egg roll.
    On Wednesday, workers scurried to get the expanse of lawn ready for the Voting Rights Act signing, setting up water stations and a large stage for Bush and the bill's primary supporters.
    The list of some of the 600 expected guests reads like a who's-who of prominent black leaders and civil rights veterans: the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson; friends and relatives of Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks; Dorothy Height, the longtime chairwoman of the National Council of Negro Women; and National Urban League head Marc Morial. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, despite its rocky history with Bush, was sending several representatives, including current president Bruce Gordon, chairman Julian Bond and former head Benjamin Hooks.
    Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi have used the occasion of the Voting Rights Act extension to criticize Bush's administration for politicizing civil rights policy and weakening enforcement of the law's provisions.
    The bill passed the Senate by a vote of 98-0 and the House 390-33. The overwhelming majorities belied the difficulties getting to that point.
    Some Southern lawmakers rebelled against renewing a law that requires their states to continue to win Justice Department approval before changing any voting rules -- punishment, they said, for racist practices that were overcome long ago. The states whose voting procedures still are overseen by the federal government are Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia.
    Other conservatives balked at provisions requiring jurisdictions with large populations of non-English-speaking citizens to print ballots in languages other than English.
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  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by witchcurlgirl View Post
    Hmmm...If they're wrong then you aren't throwing the baby out with the bathwater.
    Lots of white people are racists, but I haven't given up on the white community as a result. I could easily just say they're all racist, but I know better.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mamaste View Post
    Lots of white people are racists, but I haven't given up on the white community as a result. I could easily just say they're all racist, but I know better.
    You clearly missed my point which was I could disown anyone who was wrong.
    It's no longer a dog whistle, it's a fucking trombone


    All of God's children are not beautiful. Most of God's children are, in fact, barely presentable.


    If I wanted the government in my womb I'd fuck a Senator

  9. #24
    Elite Member witchcurlgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSDiva View Post
    OOPS MY BAD 25 YEARS!!

    Maybe MSNBC brought into a hoax, also!
    Bush signs Voting Rights Act extension - Politics - MSNBC.com
    WASHINGTON - President Bush on Thursday signed legislation extending for 25 years the Voting Rights Act, the historic 1965 law which opened polls to millions of black Americans by outlawing racist voting practices in the South. "Congress has reaffirmed its belief that all men are created equal," he declared.Bush signed the bill amid fanfare and before an South Lawn audience that included members of Congress, civil rights leaders and family members of civil rights leaders of the recent past. It was one of a series of high-profile ceremonies the president is holding to sign popular bills into law.
    The Republican controlled Congress, eager to improve its standing with minorities ahead of the November elections, pushed the bill through even though key provisions were not set to expire until next year.
    "The right of ordinary men and women to determine their own political future lies at the heart of the American experiment," Bush said. He said the Voting Rights Act proposed and signed by then-President Lyndon Johnson in 1965 "broke the segregationist lock on the voting box."
    Later Thursday, Bush is to sign another bill sure to resonate with voters in this congressional election year: legislation establishing a national Internet database designed to let law enforcement and communities know where convicted sex offenders live and work.By contrast, Bush chose to exercise the first veto of his 51/2 years as president in privacy last week, with no audience, no cameras, no reporters. The bill he vetoed would have expanded federally funded research of embryonic stem cells, which is opposed by social conservatives but has wide support among the rest of the public.
    White House officials said an open ceremony to veto a bill seemed inappropriate, although other presidents have done just that. Forty minutes after the Oval Office veto, Bush gave a major address on the issue in the East Room, open to the press and surrounded by families who have "adopted" leftover frozen embryos and used them to bear children.
    In May, Bush took to the South Lawn to sign into law a bill that extended $70 billion in previously passed tax cuts. That package was also seen by Republicans as an opportunity to boost the popularity of the president and the Republican-controlled Congress
    The South Lawn is hardly a common venue for presidential bill-signings, which usually occur in an office building next to the White House or, for particularly important legislation, in the East Room. The majestic backyard of the White House is typically reserved for pomp-filled welcoming ceremonies for foreign leaders or large social affairs like the annual Easter egg roll.
    On Wednesday, workers scurried to get the expanse of lawn ready for the Voting Rights Act signing, setting up water stations and a large stage for Bush and the bill's primary supporters.
    The list of some of the 600 expected guests reads like a who's-who of prominent black leaders and civil rights veterans: the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson; friends and relatives of Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks; Dorothy Height, the longtime chairwoman of the National Council of Negro Women; and National Urban League head Marc Morial. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, despite its rocky history with Bush, was sending several representatives, including current president Bruce Gordon, chairman Julian Bond and former head Benjamin Hooks.
    Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi have used the occasion of the Voting Rights Act extension to criticize Bush's administration for politicizing civil rights policy and weakening enforcement of the law's provisions.
    The bill passed the Senate by a vote of 98-0 and the House 390-33. The overwhelming majorities belied the difficulties getting to that point.
    Some Southern lawmakers rebelled against renewing a law that requires their states to continue to win Justice Department approval before changing any voting rules -- punishment, they said, for racist practices that were overcome long ago. The states whose voting procedures still are overseen by the federal government are Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia.
    Other conservatives balked at provisions requiring jurisdictions with large populations of non-English-speaking citizens to print ballots in languages other than English.

    The Voters Rights Act does not give blacks the right to vote.

    That right comes from the Fifteenth ammendment.

    The Voters Rights act was created to stop intimidation of blacks when they tried to excercise that right.

    There is a huge difference between the two, it's even in the article you just posted
    It's no longer a dog whistle, it's a fucking trombone


    All of God's children are not beautiful. Most of God's children are, in fact, barely presentable.


    If I wanted the government in my womb I'd fuck a Senator

  10. #25
    Gold Member mamaste's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by witchcurlgirl View Post
    You clearly missed my point which was I could disown anyone who was wrong.
    Everyone is wrong sometimes.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSDiva View Post
    OOPS MY BAD 25 YEARS!!

    Maybe MSNBC brought into a hoax, also!
    Bush signs Voting Rights Act extension - Politics - MSNBC.com
    WASHINGTON - President Bush on Thursday signed legislation extending for 25 years the Voting Rights Act, the historic 1965 law which opened polls to millions of black Americans by outlawing racist voting practices in the South. "Congress has reaffirmed its belief that all men are created equal," he declared.Bush signed the bill amid fanfare and before an South Lawn audience that included members of Congress, civil rights leaders and family members of civil rights leaders of the recent past. It was one of a series of high-profile ceremonies the president is holding to sign popular bills into law.
    The Republican controlled Congress, eager to improve its standing with minorities ahead of the November elections, pushed the bill through even though key provisions were not set to expire until next year.
    "The right of ordinary men and women to determine their own political future lies at the heart of the American experiment," Bush said. He said the Voting Rights Act proposed and signed by then-President Lyndon Johnson in 1965 "broke the segregationist lock on the voting box."
    Later Thursday, Bush is to sign another bill sure to resonate with voters in this congressional election year: legislation establishing a national Internet database designed to let law enforcement and communities know where convicted sex offenders live and work.By contrast, Bush chose to exercise the first veto of his 51/2 years as president in privacy last week, with no audience, no cameras, no reporters. The bill he vetoed would have expanded federally funded research of embryonic stem cells, which is opposed by social conservatives but has wide support among the rest of the public.
    White House officials said an open ceremony to veto a bill seemed inappropriate, although other presidents have done just that. Forty minutes after the Oval Office veto, Bush gave a major address on the issue in the East Room, open to the press and surrounded by families who have "adopted" leftover frozen embryos and used them to bear children.
    In May, Bush took to the South Lawn to sign into law a bill that extended $70 billion in previously passed tax cuts. That package was also seen by Republicans as an opportunity to boost the popularity of the president and the Republican-controlled Congress
    The South Lawn is hardly a common venue for presidential bill-signings, which usually occur in an office building next to the White House or, for particularly important legislation, in the East Room. The majestic backyard of the White House is typically reserved for pomp-filled welcoming ceremonies for foreign leaders or large social affairs like the annual Easter egg roll.
    On Wednesday, workers scurried to get the expanse of lawn ready for the Voting Rights Act signing, setting up water stations and a large stage for Bush and the bill's primary supporters.
    The list of some of the 600 expected guests reads like a who's-who of prominent black leaders and civil rights veterans: the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson; friends and relatives of Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks; Dorothy Height, the longtime chairwoman of the National Council of Negro Women; and National Urban League head Marc Morial. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, despite its rocky history with Bush, was sending several representatives, including current president Bruce Gordon, chairman Julian Bond and former head Benjamin Hooks.
    Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi have used the occasion of the Voting Rights Act extension to criticize Bush's administration for politicizing civil rights policy and weakening enforcement of the law's provisions.
    The bill passed the Senate by a vote of 98-0 and the House 390-33. The overwhelming majorities belied the difficulties getting to that point.
    Some Southern lawmakers rebelled against renewing a law that requires their states to continue to win Justice Department approval before changing any voting rules -- punishment, they said, for racist practices that were overcome long ago. The states whose voting procedures still are overseen by the federal government are Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia.
    Other conservatives balked at provisions requiring jurisdictions with large populations of non-English-speaking citizens to print ballots in languages other than English.
    There is a clear difference between the Voters Rights Act and the Fifteenth Ammendment.

    The Voters Right Act does not give blacks the the right to vote. It was created to allow blacks to exercise that right which was given by the Fifteenth Ammendment.

    It's clear in the first sentence of the article that you posted:
    President Bush on Thursday signed legislation extending for 25 years the Voting Rights Act, the historic 1965 law which opened polls to millions of black Americans by outlawing racist voting practices in the South.

    Blacks didn't get the right to vote in 1965.

    It is the Voters Rights Act that gets voted on, not the fifteenth ammendment.
    It's no longer a dog whistle, it's a fucking trombone


    All of God's children are not beautiful. Most of God's children are, in fact, barely presentable.


    If I wanted the government in my womb I'd fuck a Senator

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by witchcurlgirl View Post
    The Voters Rights Act does not give blacks the right to vote.

    That right comes from the Fifteenth ammendment.

    The Voters Rights act was created to stop intimidation of blacks when they tried to excercise that right.

    There is a huge difference between the two, it's even in the article you just posted
    Like if one didn't exist the other could happen easily!! Are you serious..I'd love to live in your world. A world where when the act was in place there was still voter intimidation, FLORIDA!! If it was placed in the freaking amendment it wouldn't be easily done!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSDiva View Post
    Let's be honest..I held my tongue because I didn't want to come off this way, but..never mind

    What the hell do some people have to be proud about when it comes to America! Slavery, being bought and sold, jim crow, segregation, hoses, dogs, hatred towards gays and lesbians, lynchings, james byrd, the tuskegee experiment, katrina, this illegal war, outing a cia agent, a liar as a president, reagonomics.. I can list MORE! You don't have to preach something to someone who have these memories, stories burned into their minds and hearts! But, some people can get past them, some can't..that's the truth of America..love it or hate it!
    I can also tell you that the fact that they have to decide every twenty years to allow black people the right to vote is fucking absurd to me! Why not make it permanent!?! The government is so quick to add an amendment banning gay marriage, why not an amendment that gives us the right to vote FOREVER!!
    How have other countries evolved with religion and racial identity? Why is America having so much trouble here?

    This is a cultural identity crisis. It ranks right up there with the Fall of Rome and the Byzantine.
    Last edited by JamieElizabeth; March 18th, 2008 at 10:22 PM.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSDiva View Post
    Let's be honest..I held my tongue because I didn't want to come off this way, but..never mind

    What the hell do some people have to be proud about when it comes to America! Slavery, being bought and sold, jim crow, segregation, hoses, dogs, hatred towards gays and lesbians, lynchings, james byrd, the tuskegee experiment, katrina, this illegal war, outing a cia agent, a liar as a president, reagonomics.. I can list MORE! You don't have to preach something to someone who have these memories, stories burned into their minds and hearts! But, some people can get past them, some can't..that's the truth of America..love it or hate it!
    I can also tell you that the fact that they have to decide every twenty years to allow black people the right to vote is fucking absurd to me! Why not make it permanent!?! The government is so quick to add an amendment banning gay marriage, why not an amendment that gives us the right to vote FOREVER!!
    So preaching hatred makes it all better? There is no justification whatsoever for the things Wright has said. You give him a pass, you give everyone else who preaches hate, division, racism, etc. a pass as well.

    Like I said, for a man who espouses so much hope, for Obama to be associated with hatred for 20 years is disturbing and disgusting. Spin it all you want.

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    This country's track record with minorities such as blacks, gays, etc... is awful. There is no doubt about it. But to lead, to be the leader of this country I think it needs to be a person who despite all this country's flaws believes in the foundation this country was built upon. I am not saying that Obama Barack doesn't, but I find it very disturbing that the church he has attended for 20 years has/had a leader who spouts just as much hatred and bigotry as any KKK member. A spirtual leader who does not believe in this country. I do not find these particular views his pastor expressed as representative of the black community, but I do find it disturbing that of all the churches Barack could choose to attend (a right guaranteed in this country) he attends this one. I want the best candidate for the job-race, gender, sexual orientation does not figure in that for me. I am just not sure if Barack Obama is it.

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