Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 23456
Results 76 to 82 of 82

Thread: Arizona governor signs immigration enforcement bill

  1. #76
    Elite Member Mel1973's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Cuntopia
    Posts
    42,983

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Penny Lane View Post
    As stated earlier.. immigration is a legitimate issue for reform.. but this is really depressing.



    Iowa candidate: Implant microchips into immigrants in country illegally | desmoinesregister.com | The Des Moines Register

    So.. we're now comparing them to dogs. Lovely. I usually don't get that upset about things like this because I'm pretty cynical, but my grandfather (a native-born citizen of legal immigrants) had to endure so many degrading and dehumanizing things in his youth... things involving being whipped on the school bus in full view of the bus driver and having things.. shoved.. into body cavities. It's heartbreaking and he's always said the only upside to all of it was that his "mijitos and mijitas" didn't have to endure any of this type of shit in their generations. I'm not saying we're at the point where Hispanic-looking citizens (or even illegal aliens) will have to endure this type of abuse and discrimination.. but at the rate we're going, it's getting there. I'm really upset about all this.. and yeah I agree it might be because it hits so close to home.. but at the end of the day no one deserves to be treated like an animal. This is a total violation of social justice I don't care what your personal political ideology might be.
    Penny, that is terrible about your grandfather. I probably don't give stuff like that the consideration it deserves given my appearance and where I live. I've assuredly taken for granted the rights I have - one of which is walking down the street without being persecuted/harassed for the color of my skin.
    The only positive thing that I can think of to say is that the religious fundies will put a stop to this chip idea. We all know how they feel about "marking" people in ways such as this - it'll feel all antichristish to them. Although, since they want to do it to people who aren't white, who knows.
    Kill him.
    Kill her.
    Kill It.
    Kill everything... that IS the solution!
    П(•_•)П
    twitchy molests my signature!

  2. #77
    Elite Member Penny Lane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Over the hills and far away
    Posts
    21,646

    Default

    Yeah I think the microchip comment is just an isolated nut being stupid and running his mouth. I hope. And thanks.. my grandpa's pretty great, I can only imagine how surreal and heartbreaking it might be for him to see this kind of sentiment semi-institutionalized.

  3. #78
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! buttmunch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Uranus
    Posts
    31,884

    Default

    Jesus Penny, that's an awful story but good thing your ganddad was made of stern stuff and kept his sense of humour. But really, micro-fucking-chips? LIke dogs? Fucking hell. I really am feeling the crazy all the way over on this side of the Atlantic. It's coming off the States in waves right now.
    'Those who sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.' Ben Franklin

    "When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying the cross."
    --Sinclair Lewis

  4. #79
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    fellow traveller
    Posts
    59,034

    Default

    another really interesting article that points out how deficient the law is - it confuses drug crime and illegal migrants. and funny how crime rates have actually gone down while the illegal migrant population has increased... i bet that's the opposite of what most people think and yet, once again, statistics prove that people's opinions and impressions are rarely based on facts and are more influenced by sensationalism in the media.


    Arizona's Real Problem: Drug Crime

    The vicious violence the border states are experiencing is not committed by migrant laborers.
    • By MARY ANASTASIA O'GRADY



    The organized-crime epidemic in Latin America, spawned by a U.S. drug policy more than four decades in the making, seems to be leeching into American cities. Powerful underworld networks supplying gringo drug users are becoming increasingly bold about expanding their businesses. In 2008, U.S. officials said that Mexican drug cartels were serving their customers in 195 American cities.
    The violence is only a fraction of what Mexico, Guatemala and Colombia live with everyday. Yet it is notable. Kidnapping rates in Phoenix, for example, are through the roof and some spectacular murders targeting law enforcement have also grabbed headlines.
    While this has been happening, would-be busboys, roofers and lawn mowers from Mexico and Central America have been using the Arizona desert to get to the U.S. because legal paths are closed and they want work.
    Technically both groups are law breakers. But it is a tragic mistake to paint them with the same brush. Doing so could inflict serious economic and moral damage on the most successful nation of immigrants in human history. Blaming the migrants for the increase in organized crime also has another downside: While it may make people feel good about legality for a time, it will do nothing to stem the growth of gangster violence in the U.S.—which is the greater threat to national security.
    View Full Image



    Reuters Along the border.






    It's tempting to couch the organized crime problem as an issue of sovereignty (i.e., Mexicans are invading!) but that ignores the role of the demand for drugs. The solution has to start with acknowledging that drug trafficking through Arizona—a key concern of citizens of that state—is the product of a complex set of federal policy failures.
    It's hard to fault Arizonans for what seems to be nothing more than a desire to enforce the rule of law. That's the idea behind the controversial new legislation allowing police to ask for documentation from individuals stopped for other reasons. As one Tucson local told me last week, there is a "feeling of insecurity because of the migration of so many illegals." Other things that seem to have sparked cries to "do something" include crowded emergency rooms, migrant trespassing, and a very human reaction to a feeling of overwhelming change in a short period of time.
    Most Americans understand intuitively that immigrants are an asset. The migrants who come north are ambitious. Many travel far, trudging through the desert for days or accepting high risks with human traffickers. They come in search of a paying job, a chance to build a business or simply hope for a better future. Their journey is the very essence of the work ethic.
    It is a sorry fact of American politics that Arizona's migrant problem was created by the feds. For much of the last decade the U.S. has needed young, hungry labor and Latin America has had an excess supply of it. But Washington worthies have refused to devise a legal immigration plan that could respond to this market reality. Congress preferred instead to wall off the California border.
    Anyone remotely familiar with immigrant aspirations could have predicted that the masses yearning to be free would find another way. They did, through the desert and into Arizona. The concentrated migrant flow through that one state is a major reason that Arizonans are reacting.
    The Americas in the News

    Get the latest information in Spanish from The Wall Street Journal's Americas page.


    It is important, though, to distinguish the drug–related violence that rates headlines from the overall pattern of immigrant behavior. Mexican migrants have not provoked a crime wave in Arizona, as some politicians and pundits argue.
    Citing Justice Department statistics, Dan Griswold, a Cato Institute scholar who has written extensively on immigration, reported last month on his blog that "the crime rate in Arizona in 2008 was the lowest it has been in four decades. In the past decade, as the number of illegal immigrants in the state grew rapidly, the violent crime rate dropped by 23 percent, the property crime rate by 28 percent." Mr. Griswold also says "census data show that immigrants are actually less likely to commit crimes than their native-born counterparts."
    This doesn't mean that drug cartels are not upending the peace. On a visit to the Journal last year, Texas Gov. Rick Perry worried about drug-related gang violence in his state's big cities. In a March letter to the editor of the Journal, El Paso City Council member Beto O'Rourke described the violence across the border in Juarez and expressed concern about the high costs for both cities which are an economically integrated region.
    The war on the supply of drugs was launched more than 40 years ago because the U.S. found that prohibition failed to contain Americans' appetite for drugs. Thousands of Latins have since died for the cause. In 2008, according to the National Survey of Drug Use and Health, 36 million Americans had used illicit drugs in the past year. Rounding up low-skilled Mexican workers and walling off the entire border is not likely to solve the problem.
    Write to O'Grady@wsj.com
    I'm open to everything. When you start to criticise the times you live in, your time is over. - Karl Lagerfeld

  5. #80
    Hit By Ban Bus! AliceInWonderland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    you already know.
    Posts
    44,439

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sputnik View Post
    another really interesting article that points out how deficient the law is - it confuses drug crime and illegal migrants. and funny how crime rates have actually gone down while the illegal migrant population has increased... i bet that's the opposite of what most people think and yet, once again, statistics prove that people's opinions and impressions are rarely based on facts and are more influenced by sensationalism in the media.
    no shit, and they say stuff like, its not a "racial or cultural concern of mine, its a financial or respect-thing" or bla bla bla bla

    didn't the same crap outbreak when Katrina's evacuees started settling elsewhere like Houston (and guess who's rebuilding New Orleans btw; its Mexicans! HA!). such is life. i mean fine, i get it, we're all racist (whether we want to admit it or not to whatever degree about whichever races) and scared of the unknown but don't fucking deny it and scapegoat and blame it on 1 random incident or fictitious statements/stats/bullshit found in forwarded emails.

  6. #81
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! buttmunch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Uranus
    Posts
    31,884

    Default

    I have a friend whose is an ex-FBI dude. He's heading on holiday to Vegas and around that region. He's half Puerto Rican and quite dark so he's actually bringing papers with him since he'll be passing through Arizona for a few days. The man was born in the North East but feels it necessary to bring papers to prove his citizenship because of the asshats that came up with all this bullshit. Can you believe that a man who served in the second world war, served his government in the FBI and has lived his entire life in the United States, other than when on assignment, has to prove he's an American? It makes me sick to my stomach.
    'Those who sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.' Ben Franklin

    "When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying the cross."
    --Sinclair Lewis

  7. #82
    Hit By Ban Bus! AliceInWonderland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    you already know.
    Posts
    44,439

    Default

    this country was made into what it is today (and in a relatively short period of time) by immigrants from all over the world. imagine what the world would be like w/o America as we know it, i cant.

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 23456

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Arizona House approves concealed weapons bill
    By celeb_2006 in forum U.S. Politics and Issues
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: April 16th, 2010, 07:07 PM
  2. Replies: 9
    Last Post: June 4th, 2009, 01:28 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: October 1st, 2008, 09:43 PM
  4. The battle lines are drawn:South Dakota gov signs anti-abortion bill.
    By buttmunch in forum U.S. Politics and Issues
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: March 7th, 2006, 11:29 AM
  5. Bush signs anti-torture bill with the provision that he will ignore it.
    By Grimmlok in forum U.S. Politics and Issues
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: January 6th, 2006, 12:09 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •