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Thread: Bobby Jindal's volcano erupts, thanks to monitoring NOBODY DIED. Asshat.

  1. #1
    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
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    Red face Bobby Jindal's volcano erupts, thanks to monitoring NOBODY DIED. Asshat.

    The one he was criticizing the monitoring of? Just erupted in the last day or so. A friend writes:


    Erupted 4 times overnight. Nobody’s dead. The FAA and the National Weather Service know where the ash cloud is (drifting away, not toward, Anchorage, thank God) and planes are being diverted around it. Gee, it’s a good thing people were monitoring.

    The eruption was accurately predicted when the number of earthquakes on the mountain suddenly jumped to 40 to 50 per hour Sunday morning. So everybody had time to get ready.

    Your tax dollars put to work by dedicated scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey who keep doing their jobs even when politicians decide to demean their work for a cheap sound bite.

    If we were approaching this from a less scientific perspective, some might be tempted to appease the volcano gods by throwing somebody into the crater. Since he doesn’t like volcano monitoring, perhaps Bobby Jindal would volunteer?


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    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
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    Now,Grimm-he would have an exorcist watching.
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    Elite Member Fluffy's Avatar
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    Your tax dollars put to work by dedicated scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey who keep doing their jobs even when politicians decide to demean their work for a cheap sound bite.
    Couldn't have been stated any better.

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    Elite Member MrsMarsters's Avatar
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    He is really an idiot...

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    Elite Member Aella's Avatar
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    How about this approach: attempt to appease volcano by throwing the human sacrifice of Bobby Jindal in the crater.

    Hey, it's a long shot, but it's a win-win situation either way!
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    Elite Member Fluffy's Avatar
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    Works for me! Actually, I'm sure it would prefer Alaskan blood. Throw Sarah Palin in!

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    Elite Member Aella's Avatar
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    I'm sure there's room for both!
    "Remember to always be yourself. Unless you suck." - Joss Whedon

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    Elite Member L1049's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aella View Post
    How about this approach: attempt to appease volcano by throwing the human sacrifice of Bobby Jindal in the crater.

    Hey, it's a long shot, but it's a win-win situation either way!
    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffy View Post
    Works for me! Actually, I'm sure it would prefer Alaskan blood. Throw Sarah Palin in!
    Are you TRYING to piss off the volcano gods?? They would consider those sacrifices downright insulting/ blasphemous.

    For some reason, I'm fascinated by volcanoes (I think I watched Dante's peak too much when I was younger). I actually didn't realize there were that many in BC until I saw the wiki article:
    Category:Volcanoes of British Columbia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    In all honesty, part of me wants to see Mt. Baker blow in my lifetime but the sane part of me is saying "I'm fucking nuts," since Baker is directly south of me.

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    Elite Member angelais's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffy View Post
    Works for me! Actually, I'm sure it would prefer Alaskan blood. Throw Sarah Palin in!
    Shit, it would erupt immediately, not being able to stand the taste of her burning flesh.
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    Elite Member Fluffy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by L1049 View Post
    In all honesty, part of me wants to see Mt. Baker blow in my lifetime but the sane part of me is saying "I'm fucking nuts," since Baker is directly south of me.
    Is Baker that close to going at some point? I've always just heard of "when Rainier" goes again. Shit, when it does, it'll be huge. I wouldn't be surprised if a lahar happened within the next 10 years.

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    Elite Member L1049's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffy View Post
    Is Baker that close to going at some point? I've always just heard of "when Rainier" goes again. Shit, when it does, it'll be huge. I wouldn't be surprised if a lahar happened within the next 10 years.
    From wiki:
    6,600 years ago

    Approximately 6,600 years ago, a series of discrete events culminated in the largest tephra-producing eruption in post-glacial time at Mount Baker. First, the largest collapse in the history of the volcano occurred from the Roman Wall and transformed into a lahar that was over 300 feet (91 m) deep in the upper reaches of the Middle Fork of the Nooksack River. It was at least 25 feet (7.6 m) deep 30 miles (48 km) downstream from the volcano and probably reached Bellingham Bay. Next, a huge hydrovolcanic explosion occurred near the site of the present day Sherman Crater, triggering a second collapse of the flank just east of the Roman Wall. That collapse also became a lahar that mainly followed the course of the first for at least 20 miles (32 km), and also spilled into tributaries of the Baker River. Finally, an eruption cloud deposited several inches of ash as far as 20 miles (32 km) downwind to the northeast.[23][5]

    [edit] Historical activity

    Several explosions occurred at Mount Baker during the mid-19th century; they were witnessed from the Bellingham area,[22]. A possible eruption was seen in June 1792 during the Spanish expedition of Dionisio Alcalá Galiano and Cayetano Valdés. Their report read, in part:
    During the night [while anchored in Bellingham Bay] we constantly saw light to the south and east of the mountain of Carmelo [Baker] and even at times some bursts of flame, signs which left no doubt that there are volcanoes with strong eruptions in those mountains.[24]
    In 1843, explorers reported a widespread layer of newly fallen rock fragments "like a snowfall" and that the forest was "on fire for miles around". Rivers south of the volcano were clogged with ash, and Native Americans reported that many salmon perished. A short time later, two collapses of the east side of Sherman Crater produced two lahars, the first and larger of which flowed into the natural Baker Lake, increasing its level by at least 10 feet (3.0 m). The location of the 19th-century lake is now covered by waters of the modern dam-impounded Baker Lake. Similar but lower level hydrovolcanic activity at Sherman Crater continued intermittently for several decades afterward.[5][23]

    On 26 November 1860, passengers who were traveling by steamer from New Westminster to Victoria reported that Mount Baker was "puffing out large volumes of smoke, which upon breaking, rolled down the snow-covered sides of the mountain, forming a pleasing effect of light and shade."[25] In 1891, about 20,000,000 cubic yards (15,000,000 m3) of rock fell producing a lahar that traveled more than 6 miles (9.7 km) and covered 1-square-mile (2.6 km2).[5][23]

    About 6 or so years ago, there was an increase in fumarole (steam/smoke, etc.) activity but no magma movement. I don't think Baker will have a large explosion anytime soon, but when it does I have a front row seat
    (do a google image search 'Mt. Baker from Abbotsford') And from Chilliwack, Mt. Baker is only 28 miles as the crow flies.

    Mt. Garibaldi (and the entire Garibaldi range) is the other large/ major volcano around here. If that thing had a huge Pelean type explosion, southwest BC and Northern WA are pretty much fucked with a capital F. Add to that, that Garibaldi has not erupted in historic times and doesn't have the fumarole activity that Baker has, when it goes it's gonna go big.

    I kind of wish I was alive when St. Helen's blew. My parents were living in
    Vancouver at the time and got a shit-load of ash.


    I know I'm rambling, but volcanoes terrify me yet fascinate me (like tornadoes.)

  12. #12
    Elite Member Fluffy's Avatar
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    Eh. Baker still pales in danger compared to Mt. Rainier, aka "the most dangerous volcano in the US" according to the USGS.

    Also, just to clarify why Rainier is so dangerous:
    Some 5,600 years ago, the body of water we call Puget Sound had an arm that extended 30 miles inland from present-day Elliott Bay in Seattle to a point halfway between Auburn and Sumner. Today, of course, that is the Green River Valley—the narrow, flat suburban land of Kent and Renton and the industrial lowlands of South Seattle. It would be reasonable to think that this change happened gradually, but scientists have determined that most of the long-gone stretch of inland sea was transformed by a single event that created 200 square miles of land in a matter of hours, with waves of mud 20 feet to 600 feet high. Imagine a wall the consistency of wet concrete traveling up to 60 mph. This mudflow destroyed everything in its path, uprooting entire old-growth forests. It hit Puget Sound with such force and with so much material that it flowed underwater for 15 miles, maybe farther. An area of hundreds of square miles was covered with mud and debris up to 350 feet deep.

    The source of that enormous mudflow, which geologists call a lahar, was Mount Rainier, about 60 miles south- southeast of Seattle. And it could happen again—maybe even tomorrow. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates there is at least a 1-in-7 chance during an average human lifespan that another catastrophic lahar could pour off the mountain. Little if any eruption would be needed to trigger it. There would be little warning near the mountain, and farther away, the most fortunate residents might have up to an hour to flee.

    Mount Rainier is potentially one of the most lethal volcanoes in the world. The United Nations has designated it as one of 14 mountains that could cause catastrophic devastation. The U.S. Geological Survey calls Rainier this country's most dangerous volcano. The explosive potential of a 14,411-foot mountain with a history of 40 ash-producing eruptions since the Ice Age should not be underestimated. But scientists agree that far more menacing, and potentially far more deadly, is the scenario of a lahar burying a large part of suburban Seattle. Under some scenarios, the city itself is vulnerable. Officials have made plans to evacuate areas near the mountain, if there's enough warning, but some emergency planners—and housing development regulations, for that matter—regard Mount Rainier as a threat far away.

    Seattle News - The Super Flood - page 1
    Last edited by Fluffy; March 24th, 2009 at 01:00 AM. Reason: added quote about Rainier

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