Page 1 of 6 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 78

Thread: A family's year of 'buying black'

  1. #1
    Elite Member celeb_2006's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    13,468

    Default A family's year of 'buying black'

    A family's year of 'buying black' - Los Angeles Times


    Maggie Anderson chats with store owner Karriem Beyah as she shops at the Farmer's Best Market in Chicago. The Anderson family spent their money for one year exclusively with black-owned businesses and are encouraging African Americans across the nation to do the same.


    An Illinois couple travels far to buy groceries, gas and even vitamins from black-owned businesses. What, they wonder, if all African Americans made the same pledge?
    By Ted Gregory

    March 10, 2009

    Reporting from Chicago Maggie Anderson drives 14 miles to buy groceries, which might seem curious given that she lives in bustling Oak Park, Ill. She and her husband, John, travel 18 miles to a health food store in Chicago for vitamins, supplements and personal care products. They drive some distance for gasoline too.

    The reason? They want to help solve what they call "the crisis in the black community." They want to buy black.

    The Andersons, African Americans who rose from humble means, are attempting to spend their money for one year exclusively with black-owned businesses and are encouraging African Americans across the nation to do the same.

    They call it the "ebony experiment."

    "More than anything, this is a learning thing," said Maggie Anderson, who grew up in the crime-ridden Liberty City neighborhood of Miami and holds a law degree and an MBA from the University of Chicago. "We know it's controversial, and we knew that coming in."

    But the Andersons said they also knew that a thriving black economy was fundamental to restoring impoverished African American communities. They talked for years about how to address the problem.

    What they came up with is provocative. One anonymous letter mailed to their home accused the Andersons of "unabashed, virulent racism. Because of you," the writer stated, "we will totally avoid black suppliers. Because of you, we will dodge every which way to avoid hiring black employees."

    Apart from that letter, most comments have been encouraging, the Andersons said, adding that most people see the endeavor as beneficial to all.

    "Supporting your own isn't necessarily exclusive," said John Anderson, a financial advisor who grew up in Detroit and has a Harvard degree in economics and an MBA from Northwestern, "and you're not going to convince everybody of that."

    The undertaking, which began Jan. 1, "is an academic test about how to reinvest in an underserved community" and lessen society's burden, he said.

    If focused on black businesses, the estimated $850 billion in black buying power in the U.S. each year can expand businesses, create jobs, and strengthen families, schools and neighborhoods, the Andersons and other advocates said.

    "When a thriving African American or urban community is realized, certainly as a society as a whole we all win," John Anderson said.

    They are using a public relations firm, have created a website -- ebonyexperiment.com -- have been laying the groundwork for nearly two years and have enlisted researchers from Northwestern University to detail and extrapolate the effects of their spending.

    Still, the first two months posed challenges in finding stores that meet what Maggie Anderson called her "exacting standards." Her latest crisis is finding shoes and clothes for the couple's toddler daughters.

    The Andersons buy gasoline cards from black-owned stations in Phoenix, Ill., and Rockford, Ill., and use the cards elsewhere.

    After several weeks of searching, Maggie Anderson found Farmers Best Market in Chicago, a black-owned grocer 14 miles from their home, and God First, God Last, God Always Dollar and Up General Store, a black-owned general merchandise establishment 18 miles from their house.

    They moved their personal accounts to Covenant Bank in Chicago, but have been unable to switch their mortgage and student loans to black-owned financial institutions. And they haven't changed utility companies.

    Lawrence Hamer, associate professor of marketing at DePaul University, called the Andersons' project "brave and courageous," and said its logic was "exactly right."

    But it probably will be futile in achieving anything meaningful in the black economy, he added.

    "It's just so hard for a small group of individuals to have an impact on something that's so huge," said Hamer, who is African American. "It's almost like a viral marketing campaign. It only works if enough people catch the virus."

    Even if they do catch the virus, Hamer said, it is extremely difficult "to get people's attention to change their behavior in any significant way."

    Maggie Anderson conceded that "it's still little by little and it's still a lot of work, but I'm still very committed to this."

    Although it may be one of the more well-organized and monitored projects of its kind, the experiment is not the only venture of its kind, said James E. Clingman, a prolific writer on African American economic empowerment who teaches a class on black entrepreneurship at the University of Cincinnati.

    African Americans have been buying black for more than a century, Clingman said. Booker T. Washington, long an advocate for African American economic power, was an early proponent, and African Americans have been forming black-buying cooperatives for decades, he added.

    But thriving black businesses began dissolving in the mid-1960s, when African Americans focused on political power and civil rights and began patronizing white-owned businesses under the misconception that buying white signified blacks' upward socioeconomic mobility, Clingman said.

    "Unfortunately, many black people abandoned their own businesses and supported others, thinking that politics was the way out," he said. "Politics still will not get you anywhere unless you have an economic base. Quite frankly, I'd rather have more black businesses than black politicians."

    In June 2008, Karriem Beyah opened Farmers Best Market, which he calls "the only African American grocery store in Illinois that offers a full line of fresh market products."

    Since being featured on the experiment's website, Beyah said, he has seen "incremental increases in the customer count" and received numerous e-mails and phone calls of support.

    He said he believed in the mission.

    "We, as African Americans, support everyone," he said. "The ebony experiment is saying, 'Listen, let's pay attention to us. Let's give some support.' Ebony experiment can bring awareness, and in that awareness comes better profits and better services and better opportunities. It just grows from there."

  2. #2
    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    In WhoreLand fucking your MOM
    Posts
    55,372

    Default

    .... well, lets just have white people go to white owned businesses and see how well that goes over.
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

  3. #3
    Elite Member louiswinthorpe111's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Middle America
    Posts
    11,918

    Default

    Interesting idea. I bet they'll make a book pitch out of it and make themselves some money.

  4. #4
    Elite Member sparkly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Exchanging glances with the cunty bitches
    Posts
    14,422

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Grimmlok View Post
    .... well, lets just have white people go to white owned businesses and see how well that goes over.
    Talk about a class action lawsuit.
    Everyone is entitled to be stupid, but some abuse the privilege.

  5. #5
    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    42,527

    Default

    I do something similar-I like to support only local merchants,whenever possible. I really hate to see them go out of business & it is hard for them to compete with big giants. I like to see everyone supporting small businesses when possible. I also like for people to support minority & woman owned businesses. My corporation insisted on it & I found most of them to be first class. You as a customer are treated In a superior manner,compared to the biggies. No,I am not worried about the big stores-they have and always will have a bigger customer base. I worry about the little guy more.
    I didn't start out to collect diamonds, but somehow they just kept piling up.-Mae West

  6. #6
    Elite Member MontanaMama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Evading P6 & P7
    Posts
    13,465

    Default

    I think this is great. There are thriving black middle, upper-middle and upper classes and I think it served the whole community to favor black-owned businesses. I love to shop locally owned businesses in my town because I know the money supports, helps and stays in my city. I don't see how this is different than the Shop Local movement.

  7. #7
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! buttmunch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Uranus
    Posts
    31,885

    Default

    .... well, lets just have white people go to white owned businesses and see how well that goes over.

    I'm going to guess that there are already people who do that. They probably don't talk about it, though.
    'Those who sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.' Ben Franklin

    "When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying the cross."
    --Sinclair Lewis

  8. #8
    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    In WhoreLand fucking your MOM
    Posts
    55,372

    Default

    Ding.
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

  9. #9
    Elite Member kingcap72's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    10 miles from Pootie Tang
    Posts
    21,909

    Default

    I'm all for supporting black businesses as a way to help pour money into the urban communities. But I'm NOT driving miles out of my way to do it.

    But the article ignored another problem with a lot of black businesses thriving in urban communities. Sometimes other black people will get jealous if they think you're making some money, and opt to not support your business, which I've seen happen over and over again.

  10. #10
    Elite Member *DIVA!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    15,742

    Default

    I frequent a few black on businesses, but not on purpose.
    The hair salon I go to is black owned. The place I go to for brunch is black owned-they have the best corncakes.
    Baltimore O's ​Fan!

    I don''t know if she really fucked the board though. Maybe just put the tip in. -Mrs. Dark

  11. #11
    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    In WhoreLand fucking your MOM
    Posts
    55,372

    Default

    I think it's a bit sick to support businesses based on the skin color of the owner.
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

  12. #12
    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    42,527

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kingcap72 View Post
    I'm all for supporting black businesses as a way to help pour money into the urban communities. But I'm NOT driving miles out of my way to do it.

    But the article ignored another problem with a lot of black businesses thriving in urban communities. Sometimes other black people will get jealous if they think you're making some money, and opt to not support your business, which I've seen happen over and over again.
    That IS cold! Never heard of that. Petty,petty,petty. Don't see that much here. I'm going to pay closer attention,but could be because I am in a suburb it is different.
    I didn't start out to collect diamonds, but somehow they just kept piling up.-Mae West

  13. #13
    Elite Member *DIVA!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    15,742

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Grimmlok View Post
    I think it's a bit sick to support businesses based on the skin color of the owner.
    Well, I agree with you to a certain extent. I think you have a right to choose a hair stylist based on skin color...whatever makes you comfortable!!
    Last edited by *DIVA!; March 9th, 2009 at 11:28 PM. Reason: spelling error.. I killed Grim!
    Baltimore O's ​Fan!

    I don''t know if she really fucked the board though. Maybe just put the tip in. -Mrs. Dark

  14. #14
    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    In WhoreLand fucking your MOM
    Posts
    55,372

    Default

    .. extent, dear. I'm not extinct yet
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

  15. #15
    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    42,527

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Grimmlok View Post
    .. extent, dear. I'm not extinct yet
    Hope springs eternal!
    I didn't start out to collect diamonds, but somehow they just kept piling up.-Mae West

Page 1 of 6 12345 ... LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 17
    Last Post: December 24th, 2008, 08:06 AM
  2. The donkeys free to wander around a family's home
    By Honey in forum Pets and Animals
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: October 19th, 2008, 01:22 PM
  3. Tom Cruise and his family's Big Apple outing
    By mrs.v in forum Latest Gossip
    Replies: 66
    Last Post: May 6th, 2008, 04:51 PM
  4. Replies: 17
    Last Post: October 20th, 2007, 07:15 PM
  5. Replies: 68
    Last Post: April 20th, 2007, 08:46 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •