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Thread: Barack Obama REJECTS John McCain's call to delay debate

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    Elite Member kingcap72's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Barack Obama REJECTS John McCain's call to delay debate

    Obama rebuffs McCain's call to delay debate
    Associated Press
    The economic crisis and raw politics threatened to derail the first presidential debate as John McCain challenged Barack Obama to delay Friday's event to work on the financial crisis. Obama rebuffed the plea, saying presidents need to "deal with more than one thing at once."
    The White House rivals maneuvered Wednesday to claim the leadership role in resolving the economic turmoil that has overshadowed their campaign. Obama said he would continue preparing for the debate and consulting with bailout negotiators and Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson. McCain said he would stop all campaigning and return to Washington on Thursday to work toward a bipartisan solution.
    "This is exactly the time when the American people need to hear from the person who, in approximately 40 days, will be responsible for dealing with this mess," Obama said in Clearwater, Fla. "It's going to be part of the president's job to deal with more than one thing at once."
    But McCain said they must focus on a bipartisan solution as the Bush administration's $700 billion bailout proposal seemed headed for defeat. If not, McCain said ominously that credit will dry up, jeopardizing home sales, individual savings and company payrolls.
    "I do not believe that the plan on the table will pass as it currently stands, and we are running out of time," McCain said.
    Both candidates accepted President Bush's invitation to attend a White House meeting Thursday afternoon with congressional leaders in hopes of agreeing on a rescue plan. McCain had spoken with Bush earlier Wednesday and requested such a meeting.
    In a joint statement Wednesday night, the candidates said the country faces "a moment of economic crisis" and they called for political unity to solve it because "the jobs, savings and the prosperity of the American people are at stake." Both said Bush's plan was "flawed."
    "We cannot risk an economic catastrophe," they said.
    Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., McCain's representative in debate negotiations, told The Associated Press that McCain will not attend the debate unless there is agreement on a solution that is publicly endorsed by Obama, McCain, the White House and congressional leaders.
    Asked whether the debate could go on, Obama spokesman Robert Gibbs said: "My sense is there's going to be a stage, a moderator, an audience and at least one presidential candidate."
    The jockeying between McCain and Obama began after the senators spoke privately Wednesday.
    McCain beat Obama to the punch with the first public statement. The surprise announcement was an attempt to outmaneuver Obama on an issue McCain trails on and as the Democrat gains in the polls. McCain went before TV cameras minutes after they spoke and before the campaigns could hammer out the agreed-upon joint statement.
    Obama, too, made a political calculation by rejecting McCain's challenge while still trying to appear on top of the problem. Obama repeatedly stressed that he called McCain first to propose a joint statement. He said McCain called back several hours later and agreed, but also said he wanted to postpone the debate and hold joint meetings in Washington. Obama said he suggested they first issue the statement.
    "When I got back to the hotel, he had gone on television to announce what he was going to do," Obama said.
    McCain said he would return to Washington on Thursday after an address to former President Clinton's Global Initiative session. He canceled a scheduled appearance on CBS' "The Late Show with David Letterman" and a meeting with India's prime minister.
    McCain called Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to propose that joint meetings with Obama and congressional leaders be held quickly, according to leadership aides. Reid spokesman Jim Manley said Reid responded by reading McCain his public statement, in which Reid said it would not be helpful for the candidates to come back and inject presidential politics into the negotiations.
    Reid later told reporters that McCain "is trying to divert attention from his failing campaign."

    Debate planners said they were continuing to prepare for the event at the University of Mississippi.
    McCain's running mate, Sarah Palin, was canceling her limited campaign events. She told the "CBS Evening News" that the country could be headed for another Great Depression if Congress doesn't reach a solution.
    How long the suspension would last, McCain adviser Steve Schmidt would not say.
    McCain has struggled with how to handle the situation, which he might escape with modest political damage if he and Obama can reach some type of accord on the matter.
    Scores of congressional Republicans hinted this week that they may oppose the $700 billion proposal, and Reid pointedly suggested that Democrats could not be expected to back it if McCain did not publicly do so.
    That leaves McCain with two unpalatable choices. He can oppose a major Republican initiative the administration says is needed to prevent a full-blown recession, and risk blame if the prediction comes true. Or he can vote for an extraordinarily costly bailout, which many Americans seem to resent, just when polls show him falling farther behind Obama. Obama also risks voter wrath if he supports the bailout. But he could frame his stand as bipartisan statesmanship, whereas McCain's vote could be spun as another example of him siding with Bush, a major impediment to his campaign.
    Obama rebuffs McCain's call to delay debate
    Glad Obama is sticking to his guns.

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    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
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    Letterman just said McClain has been absent for the last 2 years running for Pres-why the big rush now??
    I didn't start out to collect diamonds, but somehow they just kept piling up.-Mae West

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    Elite Member kingcap72's Avatar
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    Because he knows that he made an ass of himself last week, which helped give Obama some momentum, so now he's trying to pull the stall tactics.

    McCain seems to have this idea that HE'S the one dictating the course of this election and everybody, including Obama and the media, are suppose to fall in line.

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    Elite Member Fluffy's Avatar
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    When I was watching AC 360, John King said he thought the debates would go on. It'll be interesting because I think McCain is going to take a hit because of this.

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    Elite Member kingcap72's Avatar
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    ^^If McCain doesn't show up and Obama does, then he can't start whining that Obama had an unfair advantage. Plus, it keeps him from being able to postpone the VP debate, which is his real plan, anyway.

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    Friend of Gossip Rocks! buttmunch's Avatar
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    I am sitting here stunned. It's like a really, really back Grisham novel that suddenly makes a completely implausable yet interesting twist.
    'Those who sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.' Ben Franklin

    "When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying the cross."
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    Elite Member lurkur's Avatar
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    Selfless or Reckless? McCain Gambles on Voters' Verdict.

    Selfless or Reckless? McCain Gambles on Voters' Verdict.

    Selfless or Reckless? McCain Gambles on Voters' Verdict.
    By Dan Balz
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Thursday, September 25, 2008; A01

    NEW YORK, Sept. 24 -- John McCain is a gambler by nature, and the bet he placed Wednesday may be among the biggest of his political life.

    The Republican presidential nominee is hoping that his abrupt decision to suspend campaigning, seek a delay of Friday's debate with Democrat Barack Obama and return to Washington to help prod negotiations over a financial rescue package will be seen as the kind of country-first, bipartisan leadership he believes Americans want.

    What he risks, if things don't go as he hopes, is a judgment by voters that his move was a reckless act by an impetuous and struggling politician that hardened partisan lines in Washington at just the wrong moment and complicated efforts to deal with the biggest financial crisis in more than half a century.

    McCain laid out his rationale in stark terms, saying that the economy is in crisis and that he does not believe the package now on the table in Washington can win enough votes to pass. "Americans across our country lament the fact that partisan divisions in Washington have prevented us from addressing our national challenges," he said here in New York. "Now is our chance to come together to prove that Washington is once again capable of leading this country."

    In the heated atmosphere of Wednesday afternoon, as the two campaigns plotted and maneuvered around each other, it was impossible to know what the ultimate verdict would be on McCain's surprise decision. He managed once again, at least in the short term, to shake up the presidential race at a time when national and state polls show Obama opening up a clear lead. And by day's end, he had forced his rival to blink.

    Obama initially resisted McCain's call to join him and return to Washington. But hours later he was forced to capitulate when President Bush called him and asked him to participate in a White House meeting with congressional leaders and his GOP rival. Shortly after that, the two candidates issued a joint statement calling for action.

    But while agreeing to go back to Washington, Obama insisted last night, as he had earlier in the day, that Friday's debate go ahead as scheduled.

    "I believe that we should continue to have the debate," he told reporters in Florida, where he is preparing for it. "I think that it makes sense for us to present ourselves before the American people, to talk about the nature of the problems that we're having in our financial system, to talk about how it relates to our global standing in the world, what implications it has for our national security, how it relates to critical questions like the war in Iraq and Afghanistan."

    Much now will depend on whether McCain can deliver results, whether there is a constructive role for him and Obama, or if they become a sideshow to the real negotiations. But Obama's course carries risks as well, if he looked as if he were standing on the sidelines while McCain pushed for intervention that could help avert further damage to the nation's economy.

    The standoff over the debate left both candidates in potentially awkward positions, although there is plenty of time for it to be resolved. McCain may be reluctant to climb down from his insistence that the debate be delayed until there is an agreement on a package, but he could be seen as scuttling an important event for voters eager to see the two candidates side by side. Obama, on the other hand, may look high-handed if he insists on going ahead as negotiations in Washington reach a critical moment by this weekend.

    At a minimum, voters were treated again to contrasting styles of leadership Wednesday, with McCain willing to act boldly, if impulsively, to inject himself into the middle of delicate negotiations to force a solution, and Obama adopting a cooler approach designed to show calm in the midst of crisis while preferring to give long-distance encouragement to all parties in the talks.


    Partisan lines hardened quickly after McCain's statement.
    Republican leaders rallied around McCain. Former House speaker Newt Gingrich said the decision to suspend campaigning and lend a hand to the negotiations in Washington was "the greatest single act of responsibility ever taken by a presidential candidate." He said it rivaled Dwight Eisenhower's declaration during the 1952 campaign that he would go to Korea as president, if necessary, to help end that conflict.
    "This is the day the McCain-reform Republican Party began to truly emerge as a movement which puts country first, solutions first, and big change first," he said in a statement.

    House Minority Leader John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) said he strongly supported McCain's call for a bipartisan leadership meeting. "Given that it is only a few months before a new President takes the oath of office," he said in a statement, "it is vital that the next President play an active role in crafting this critical plan."

    But privately, three Republican strategists were sharply critical, viewing McCain's decision as a high-risk move that entails uncertain negotiations in Washington at the possible expense of a debate they believe McCain badly needs to get back on the offensive. One strategist called the move "desperate and nuts," and another said in an e-mail, "I don't get it at all."
    All spoke on the condition of anonymity because they did not want to criticize McCain publicly.

    Democrats denounced McCain's move as political grandstanding, and they quickly urged Obama to stay away. Senate Majority Leader Harry M. Reid (D-Nev.), no friend of McCain's, said the country would be better served if McCain and Obama went ahead with their debate. "If that changes, we will call upon them. We need leadership; not a campaign photo op," he said in a statement.

    McCain advisers dismissed Reid's statement as both raw partisanship and particularly disingenuous, coming as it did just a day after the Senate leader had taunted McCain to make his views on the current financial package clear and warning him against a "no" vote that could scuttle the entire rescue.

    Senate Democratic Whip Richard J. Durbin (Ill.) said McCain's move was motivated not by concerns about stock market declines but by the GOP nominee's sagging poll numbers. "It's not economic leadership that Senator McCain would bring to these negotiations," he said in a statement. "It's presidential politics -- which is the last thing we need if we really want to solve the serious problems our nation faces."

    Democratic strategists were even harsher in their criticism. "McCain is doing this without having laid any predicate for the idea that his participation is crucial to the process," said pollster Geoff Garin. "His activity for the last seven days or more completely belies that. . . . This is not going to be seen as either an act of strength or act of confidence."

    Mark Mellman, another Democratic pollster, said Wednesday's move, like McCain's pick of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin as his running mate, was a political stunt aimed at shaking up the race. "McCain thinks he learned with Palin that shaking things up when you are falling behind can pay off," he said. "It did then, albeit briefly. It won't now."

    McCain is betting otherwise. On the biggest issue in the election, one that favors his rival, the Republican nominee believes he can buck the odds and produce results. It may not take long to know whether the gamble paid off.

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    Elite Member Fluffy's Avatar
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    Democratic strategists were even harsher in their criticism. "McCain is doing this without having laid any predicate for the idea that his participation is crucial to the process," said pollster Geoff Garin. "His activity for the last seven days or more completely belies that. . . . This is not going to be seen as either an act of strength or act of confidence."

    Mark Mellman, another Democratic pollster, said Wednesday's move, like McCain's pick of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin as his running mate, was a political stunt aimed at shaking up the race. "McCain thinks he learned with Palin that shaking things up when you are falling behind can pay off," he said. "It did then, albeit briefly. It won't now."

    McCain is betting otherwise. On the biggest issue in the election, one that favors his rival, the Republican nominee believes he can buck the odds and produce results. It may not take long to know whether the gamble paid off.
    I believe that such a compulsive gambler shouldn't be in the highest office in the land.

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    Elite Member kingcap72's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffy View Post
    I believe that such a compulsive gambler shouldn't be in the highest office in the land.
    Yeah, we've already had a compulsive drunk in the highest office in the land for the last 8 years. That was enough.

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    McCain is screwed. I like John McCain; I wanted to vote for him. Then, he picked Palin and I thought,"Well, ok, we (women) are finally getting our turn. She is very conservative, but you know, maybe that is what we need." She has no business being in that high of an office. Clueless. We are in deep shit and they want us to bail out the rich? My problem with Obama was that I was afraid of being taxed to death for social programs. Bush and Co. are going to tax me to death to bail out corporations that can't manage their business? Hell no. Enough. Obama can't be worse than what we got now. Let's give him a try.

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    Elite Member kingcap72's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ya-ya_sister View Post
    McCain is screwed. I like John McCain; I wanted to vote for him. Then, he picked Palin and I thought,"Well, ok, we (women) are finally getting our turn. She is very conservative, but you know, maybe that is what we need." She has no business being in that high of an office. Clueless. We are in deep shit and they want us to bail out the rich? My problem with Obama was that I was afraid of being taxed to death for social programs. Bush and Co. are going to tax me to death to bail out corporations that can't manage their business? Hell no. Enough. Obama can't be worse than what we got now. Let's give him a try.
    Exactly. Even if somebody isn't thrilled with the choice of either Obama or McCain, the fact is Obama's the lesser of the two evils. And Palin just draws more attention to that fact.

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    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
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    He gambled big time on Palin. I really am scared of him now. He is supremely self centered. The Country is just junked for his own ego! I will be voting against him.
    I didn't start out to collect diamonds, but somehow they just kept piling up.-Mae West

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    Elite Member nana55's Avatar
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    Plus unless you make over $250,000 a year you will be taxed less. Also, he's not raising the taxes on the rich, just moving them back to what they were before Bush lowered them. That worked out well.
    If I can't be a good example, then let me be a horrible warning.

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    Elite Member *DIVA!'s Avatar
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    I heard on KO tonight that John McCain had nothing to do in DC, until Dubya scheduled that meeting..
    Baltimore O's ​Fan!

    I don''t know if she really fucked the board though. Maybe just put the tip in. -Mrs. Dark

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    Elite Member RevellingInSane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ya-ya_sister View Post
    McCain is screwed. I like John McCain; I wanted to vote for him. Then, he picked Palin and I thought,"Well, ok, we (women) are finally getting our turn. She is very conservative, but you know, maybe that is what we need." She has no business being in that high of an office. Clueless. We are in deep shit and they want us to bail out the rich? My problem with Obama was that I was afraid of being taxed to death for social programs. Bush and Co. are going to tax me to death to bail out corporations that can't manage their business? Hell no. Enough. Obama can't be worse than what we got now. Let's give him a try.
    It's called choosing the lesser of two evils, also known as a political election. Neither of them is perfect, but I had to choose the one I thought would give me a better chance of living to see 2012. I may be boiling rocks for soup by then, but I won't be vaporized due to someone's bully tactics. Of course, if the elderly PTSD victim checks out before the end of the term, I could still face stoning on Main Street for having sex, thanks to his pious veep's religion based rule.



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