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Thread: John McCain's Sarah Palin pick is the epitome of tokenism

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    Elite Member Fluffy's Avatar
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    Default John McCain's Sarah Palin pick is the epitome of tokenism

    McCain's Palin pick is the epitome of tokenism

    Suddenly all anyone needs to qualify as a potential commander in chief is to be a religious ideologue with female gender characteristics?
    By Joe Conason

    Aug. 30, 2008 | It is hard to think of a more cynical and contemptuous political act this year than John McCain's selection of Sarah Palin as his vice-presidential running mate. Having served as governor of Alaska for less than two years -- and as mayor of a small town before that -- her qualifications for national office are minimal.

    Palin is the epitome of tokenism, exactly what conservative Republicans have always claimed to scorn, until today, as the politics of quotas and political correctness. Even Rush Limbaugh is a feminazi now (at least until Election Day).

    But if Palin's résumé is limited, to put it politely, she possesses the only two qualities that McCain now seems to consider essential: She is a right-wing religious ideologue with female gender characteristics. Suddenly that is all anyone needs to qualify as a potential commander in chief of the world's most powerful military. We probably won't hear so much from now on about "experience" and "judgment," McCain's vaunted standard for the presidency until ... today. We certainly won't hear again about the "person most prepared to take my place," the phrase he has used more than once to describe his main criterion for a running mate.

    When CNN political correspondent Dana Bash interviewed McCain last April, she mentioned his joke that one of the two main tasks of the vice president is to check on the president's health every day, a job of particular importance in his case. What did he mean by that? It was just a humorous remark, he said. But when she pressed him further, McCain said: "I think about whether that person who I select would be most prepared to take my place. And that would be the key criteria [sic]."

    Sometime between then and now, a focus group must have told McCain and his handlers that the experience argument wasn't cutting against Barack Obama, that the nomination of Joe Biden as Obama's running mate had eviscerated it completely -- and that instead he and his consultants had better find a way to corral disgruntled Hillary Clinton supporters, or forget about winning come November.

    Clearly nobody in the Republican camp is concerned that Palin would be clueless in a national security crisis, should a 72-year-old or older President McCain abruptly die or become disabled. Perhaps the GOP will have to mothball all those "Country First" banners along with the experience meme, because no candidate who puts the security of the nation above politics would ever contemplate this maneuver.

    Even as a political tactic, choosing Palin may well backfire. Presumably the same Clinton voters who were willing to vote for McCain mostly to vote against Obama -- despite the Arizona senator's right-wing record on reproductive rights and pay equity -- will be pleased by the choice of Palin. But by definition those voters were already attracted to the Republican side. The calculation is that millions of undecided Hillary backers will cross partisan lines because a woman is on McCain's ticket. But will they believe that Palin is comparable to Clinton just because both happen to be female? Or will they regard that comparison as an insult to their heroine?

    The Palin nomination will be celebrated as a measure of social progress by optimists like my friend Joan Walsh. At the very least, let us hope that the Republicans will no longer complain so bitterly about affirmative action, since they have taken that policy to its absurd conclusion in what may be the most fateful decision of this campaign.

    Back when the first woman was nominated by a major party to be vice president, conservatives didn't react quite so positively as today. In August 1984, an editorial in the National Review mocked Democrats for choosing Geraldine Ferraro to run with former Vice President Walter Mondale. "The Democrats will attempt to project the issue as 'whether a woman can be Vice President,' a point the Republicans can cheerfully concede, returning to the question of whether this woman in particular should be the Vice-President ... Mrs. Ferraro is manifestly an affirmative-action nominee. She has been in the House only since 1979 and cannot be said, on the record, to be as qualified to be President, if necessary, as, say John Glenn, Fritz Hollings, Mo Udall, or -- George Bush."

    Looking back on the Ferraro nomination, another well-known conservative wrote: "I believe that someday we are going to have a woman president, possibly during my life, and I've often thought the best way to pave the way for this was to first nominate and elect a woman as vice-president. But I think Mondale made a serious mistake when he picked Geraldine Ferraro as his running mate. In my view, he guessed wrong in deciding to take a congresswoman that almost nobody had ever heard of and try to put her in line for the presidency ... I don't know who among the Democrats might have been a better choice, but it was obvious Mondale picked Geraldine Ferraro simply because he believed there was a 'gender gap' where I was concerned and she was a woman."

    Those are the words of Ronald Reagan in his 1991 memoir, "An American Life," pouring scorn on the nomination of a woman who had served six years in Congress working on foreign policy issues. In retrospect, he had a point. Only this Palin gambit could make the Ferraro mistake look responsible and wise.

    John McCain's choice of Sarah Palin as vice-presidential nominee | Salon

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    Elite Member Cali's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffy View Post
    [SIZE=3] it was obvious Mondale picked Geraldine Ferraro simply because he believed there was a 'gender gap' where I was concerned and she was a woman."

    Those are the words of Ronald Reagan in his 1991 memoir, "An American Life," pouring scorn on the nomination of a woman who had served six years in Congress working on foreign policy issues. In retrospect, he had a point. Only this Palin gambit could make the Ferraro mistake look responsible and wise.
    Yep. Agree ten-fold.

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    Elite Member kingcap72's Avatar
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    I'd love to hear what Ferraro has to say about this, since she said that Obama's race is why he's where he is.

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    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
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    Source: Real Clear Politics ()
    Article from JUNE 2008!

    June 04, 2008
    McCain Should Pick Sarah Palin for VP
    By Jack Kelly

    Who? When?


    Republicans including, I imagine, Sen. McCain himself are asking these
    questions about his selection of a vice presidential candidate.

    Ideally, a presidential candidate wants a running mate who will
    help him or her win the election, and (maybe) to govern afterwards.

    But most will settle for a veep who isn't a drag on the ticket, as Dan
    Quayle was for the first President Bush.

    Traditionally, a presidential nominee has chosen a running mate to
    balance the ticket geographically, or to appease a faction of the party.
    The most successful example of this was when John F. Kennedy picked
    Lyndon Johnson, though neither liked the other, and LBJ joined the ticket
    only because he thought Kennedy would lose.

    Bill Clinton broke with this tradition when he chose another young
    (purported) moderate from a neighboring southern state. By picking Al
    Gore, he hoped to reinforce his campaign theme of generational change.

    Which way will Sen. McCain go? The potential running mates most often
    discussed have downsides nearly as great as their upsides. Gov. Tim
    Pawlenty helps only in Minnesota, and not enough, according to current
    polls, to make a difference there. Sen. McCain's friend Sen. Joe Lieberman
    would bring in some moderate Democrats, but could further antagonize
    conservatives already suspicious of Sen. McCain. Gov. Romney would have
    little appeal to working class whites unhappy with Sen. Obama, and
    evangelicals fret about that Mormon thing. A Huckabee nomination would
    irritate economic and foreign policy conservatives as much as it would please
    evangelicals.

    Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal is a rising star. But he's only 36, and he's been
    governor for less than a year.
    There is one potential running mate who has virtually no down side.
    Those conservatives who've heard of her were delighted to learn that
    McCain advance man Arthur Culvahouse was in Alaska recently, because
    they surmised he could only be there to discuss the vice presidential
    nomination with Gov. Sarah Palin.
    At 44, Sarah Louise Heath Palin is both the youngest and the first female
    governor in Alaska's relatively brief history as a state. She's also the most
    popular governor in America, with an approval rating that has bounced
    around 90 percent
    .


    This is due partly to her personal qualities. When she was leading her
    underdog Wasilla high school basketball team to the state championship
    in 1982, her teammates called her "Sarah Barracuda" because of
    her fierce competitiveness.

    Two years later, when she won the "Miss Wasilla" beauty pageant, she
    was also voted "Miss Congeniality" by the other contestants.

    Sarah Barracuda. Miss Congeniality. Fire and nice. A happily married
    mother of five who is still drop dead gorgeous. And smart to boot.


    But it's mostly because she's been a crackerjack governor, a strong fiscal
    conservative and a ferocious fighter of corruption, especially in her own party.

    Ms. Palin touches other conservative bases, some of which Sen. McCain has
    been accused of rounding. Track, her eldest son, enlisted in the Army last
    Sept. 11. She's a lifetime member of the National Rifle Association who
    hunts,
    fishes and runs marathons. A regular churchgoer, she's staunchly
    pro-life
    .

    Kimberley Strassel of the Wall Street Journal said Sen. McCain should run
    against a corrupt, do-nothing Congress, a la Harry Truman. If he should
    choose to do so, Gov. Palin would make an excellent partner "The landscape
    is littered with the bodies of those who have crossed Sarah," pollster Dave
    Dittman told the Weekly Standard's Fred Barnes.

    Sen. Barack Obama's support has plunged recently among white women.
    Many Hillary Clinton supporters accuse him -- I think unfairly -- of being
    sexist. Having Sarah Palin on the ticket could help Sen. McCain appeal to
    these disgruntled Democrats.

    Running mates usually aren't named until the convention. But if Sen. McCain
    should name Gov. Palin earlier, it would give America more time to get to
    know this extraordinary woman. And because she's at least a dozen feature
    stories waiting to be written, she could help him dominate the news between
    now and the conventions.

    Another reason for selecting Sarah Palin early would be to force Barack
    Obama to make a mistake. He'd have to rule out choosing someone like
    Virginia Sen. Jim Webb as his running mate, for fear of exacerbating charges
    of sexism. And if he chose a woman other than Hillary, the impression
    Democrats are wimpy would be intensified.
    And, after the Repug VP pick:
    Source: The Huffington Post

    Linda Bergthold

    The VP Choice that Lost the Presidency for McCain

    I think we will look back at today as the day when the Republicans most
    certainly lost the Presidency. In choosing Sarah Palin of Alaska for Vice
    President, the Republicans have made a cynical but clever choice. At least
    they think it is clever. She is a woman, young (44 years old), a Governor
    (only two years), a mother (five children), pro-life, and pro-gun. But what
    is she not? She is NOT pro-choice. She has NO national experience. She
    has never been under the intense scrutiny of a national campaign. She is
    under investigation for some incident in Alaska that is messy and personal.
    She has no international experience. Her experience governing is in a very
    small state, famous for its "Bridge to Nowhere" kind of political graft. Her
    Republican colleague in that state, Senator Ted Stevens has been indicted
    for corruption.

    When Republicans and independents go into the voting booth, will they
    have the confidence to vote for a McCain-Palin ticket, knowing that John
    McCain has had several recurrences of his skin cancer, and will be the
    oldest President ever? Can they imagine Sarah Palin stepping into the
    Oval Office and dealing with all the problems we face right now? The
    Russians and the terrorists must be quaking in their boots.


    It's a slap in the face of other Republican women like Kay Bailey Hutchison,
    bless her heart, who was forced to stumble through an interview on TV
    trying to make the case for Palin whom she has never met.
    There are
    certainly women in the Republican party who were "in line" for this before
    Palin. Did the Rovian type advisors to McCain just cynically think that
    throwing a young attractive inexperienced woman into the mix would satisfy
    women who long to see a woman president? Women, and Republican women,
    are not so stupid as to fall for that! It is reminiscent of the Republicans
    putting up Alan Keyes to run against Barack Obama for the Illinois Senate
    just because he was black. Voters saw through that pretty quickly.

    It's also a slap in the face of Democratic women voters. They don't get
    Hillary but they get Sarah as the first potential woman President? In fact,
    I can just hear Biden saying, "Sarah Palin, you are NO Hillary Clinton!" I
    would imagine that the few remaining Clinton supporters who are wondering
    if they should support John McCain are even more leery now. There is
    absolutely no overlap between the positions Hillary Clinton has fought her
    entire life for and Sarah Palin. The two women are not remotely
    substitutable. They are as different as they can be.

    How will this cynicism play with American voters? It is insulting to women
    to suggest that just "any" woman will do!
    Palin on Charlie Rose (Oct.12, 2007):
    [YOUTUBE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EbSlc4XGGnk[/YOUTUBE]
    Last edited by HWBL; August 30th, 2008 at 05:28 AM.
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    Elite Member Fluffy's Avatar
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    ^I'm sure there are lots of Republican women who are shocked. I kind of wonder how long they'll help on the campaign trail. It seemed most of the Republican party members that I saw interviewed on tv yesterday were struggling to justify Palin as VP. Clearly, there were no talking points on her yet, but really what could they possibly say?

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    The talking points from now own will go as follow..
    She is pro-family, pro-life, pro-gun, and pro-drill. She ran a state and can run this country. Anyone who questions her experience is sexist, and don't want to see a woman succeed!
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSDiva View Post
    Anyone who questions her experience is sexist, and don't want to see a woman succeed!
    It seems this is only fair: Obama supporters have accused those questioning his own lack of experience of racism.

    In fact, I have seen several articles written recently which state that anybody who doesn't vote for Obama is a racist. Apparently, there are no other reasons why people wouldn't support Obama and millions of people voting for Obama simply because he is a (1/2) black man is okay but the reverse is appauling.

    But, yep, Obama and Palin are basically where they are because of their race and gender respectively. Neither have the experience required for the offices they are running for. And please don't try to convince me that Obama would have had the media profile to run for President if he weren't a black man. If he were John Doe, white Senator, ranked 99th in senority and little record of authoring and passing legislation, he wouldn't have stood a chance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SSDiva View Post
    The talking points from now own will go as follow..
    She is pro-family, pro-life, pro-gun, and pro-drill. She ran a state and can run this country. Anyone who questions her experience is sexist, and don't want to see a woman succeed!
    Well then there's balance because anyone who questions Obama is a racist and wants to keep the black man down.

    It doesn't matter if she doesn't appeal to you. She appeals to conservatives, and her on the ticket has united the Republican party.

    A government big enough to give you everything you want,
    is strong enough to take everything you have. ~Thomas Jefferson

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    Quote Originally Posted by purple rain View Post
    It seems this is only fair: Obama supporters have accused those questioning his own lack of experience of racism.

    In fact, I have seen several articles written recently which state that anybody who doesn't vote for Obama is a racist. Apparently, there are no other reasons why people wouldn't support Obama and millions of people voting for Obama simply because he is a (1/2) black man is okay but the reverse is appauling.

    But, yep, Obama and Palin are basically where they are because of their race and gender respectively. Neither have the experience required for the offices they are running for. And please don't try to convince me that Obama would have had the media profile to run for President if he weren't a black man. If he were John Doe, white Senator, ranked 99th in senority and little record of authoring and passing legislation, he wouldn't have stood a chance.
    When has any Obama supporter accused somebody of being racist for questioning Obama's experience? People keep throwing that around but can't give any examples of it.

    And to say that Obama's race got him to where he is is ridiculous, because he had to fight his way to the Democratic nomination, whereas Palin got picked for the VP slot just to appeal to female voters. Obama has made his case to be president for 18 months and now Palin gets just over two months to make her's after coming out of nowhere. McCain picked her after only meeting her ONCE.

    And, true, neither one has all of the experience they need for the respective positions. But at least Obama knows what the president is suppose to do.
    Last edited by kingcap72; August 30th, 2008 at 01:32 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kingcap72 View Post
    When has any Obama supporter accused somebody of being racist for questioning Obama's experience? People keep throwing that around but can't give any examples of it.

    And to say that Obama's race got him to where he is is ridiculous, because he had to fight his way to the Democratic nomination, whereas Palin got the picked for the VP slot just to appeal to female voters. Obama has made his case to be president for 18 months and now Palin gets just over two months to make her's after coming out of nowhere. McCain picked her after only meeting her ONCE.

    And, true, neither one has all of the experience they need for the respective positions. But at least Obama knows what the president is suppose to do.
    Hear, hear. God, I hate the spin Repugs put on everything.
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    People who trash Obama aren't racists, unless they actually make racial remarks. Just like, if someone trashes Palin, they're not being sexist, unless they make sexist remarks. The unjust accusations can stand to stop for both sides, IMO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleWasHere View Post
    People who trash Obama aren't racists, unless they actually make racial remarks. Just like, if someone trashes Palin, they're not being sexist, unless they make sexist remarks.

    Both of these statements are completely untrue.

    People will go out of their way not to vote for Obama just b/c he's black and same with Palin b/c she's a woman. Just because they don't make a racial/sexist slur doesn't mean they aren't racist or sexist.

    Plenty of people use the excuse of lack of expericence for Obama when in reality it's because he's black. They just don't want to appear ignorant/racist so they find another reason..

    They'll do the same for her.. although I'm really not sure she's got a lot going for her regardless of her gender.



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    Quote Originally Posted by kingcap72 View Post
    When has any Obama supporter accused somebody of being racist for questioning Obama's experience? People keep throwing that around but can't give any examples of it.

    And to say that Obama's race got him to where he is is ridiculous, because he had to fight his way to the Democratic nomination, whereas Palin got picked for the VP slot just to appeal to female voters. Obama has made his case to be president for 18 months and now Palin gets just over two months to make her's after coming out of nowhere. McCain picked her after only meeting her ONCE.

    And, true, neither one has all of the experience they need for the respective positions. But at least Obama knows what the president is suppose to do.
    Do you want me to list all the articles written about it or do you want to google it for yourself? Even some here have tried to make that oh so subtle connection of questioning Obama = racism. And let's say Obama loses. How many 'this proves that America is still racist' reports are we going to hear?

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    is strong enough to take everything you have. ~Thomas Jefferson

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    Quote Originally Posted by laynes View Post
    Both of these statements are completely untrue.

    People will go out of their way not to vote for Obama just b/c he's black and same with Palin b/c she's a woman. Just because they don't make a racial/sexist slur doesn't mean they aren't racist or sexist.

    Plenty of people use the excuse of lack of expericence for Obama when in reality it's because he's black. They just don't want to appear ignorant/racist so they find another reason..

    They'll do the same for her.. although I'm really not sure she's got a lot going for her regardless of her gender.

    Oh, so people can't have a valid reason to not vote for Obama, or McCain/Palin? Give me a fucking break. I'm not voting for McCain/Palin. Does that make me sexist? Nope. They're both against everything I stand for.

    If I were a Republican or conservative, would it make me racist if I didn't vote for Obama? No, because if I were a Republican, chances are he'd be against a lot of what I stood for, then.

    There ARE racists and sexists everywhere, but they don't make up the entire country. Some people have POLITICAL REASONS to not vote for one or the other.

    Open your mind a little bit. It's not JUST about racism and sexism.

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