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Thread: Virginia "apologizes" for slavery

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    Default Virginia "apologizes" for slavery




    Opinion Editorial by Walter Williams - Mar 9, 2007
    Both chambers of the Commonwealth of Virginia’s General Assembly passed a resolution saying government-sanctioned slavery “ranks as the most horrendous of all depredations of human rights and violations of our founding ideals in our nation’s history.”
    “And. . . the abolition of slavery was followed by. . . systematic discrimination, enforced segregation, and other insidious institutions and practices toward Americans of African descent that were rooted in racism, racial bias, and racial misunderstanding.”
    The General Assembly also expressed regret for the “exploitation of Native Americans.”


    Isn't that nice? I agree that slavery was an abomination, but I’m going to be even more generous than Virginia’s General Assembly. I regret the murder of an estimated 61 million people whom the former USSR executed, slaughtered, starved, beat, or tortured to death.


    I also regret the Chinese government's slaughter of 45 million Chinese; Hitler’s slaughter of 6 million Jews; the Khmer Rouge’s murder of 2 million Cambodians; the half a million Ugandans murdered by Idi Amin’s death squads; the million Hutus and Tutsis murdered in Rwanda’s genocidal bloodbath; and slavery that still exists in the Sudan and Mauritania.
    All of these, and many more, are horrible injustices at least as horrible as the slavery that existed in the U.S. But after all the regrets and apologies for injustices, what comes next? Let’s examine Virginia's statement of regret with an eye toward what it might mean.


    I can personally relate to the Virginia General Assembly’s declaration. My great-grandparents were slaves in the Virginia cities of Chase City and Newport News. The General Assembly’s statement of regret for slavery means absolutely nothing to me. If anything, it’s nothing less than a cheap insult and capitulation of white delegates to black hustlers.
    Possibly, the whites who voted in support of the declaration were mau-maued into it or they felt guilt over our history of slavery. In any case, they should know that their actions mean little in dealing with the day-to-day plight of many black Virginians — which has nothing to do with slavery.


    The U.S. murder rate is 5.6 people per 100,000 of the population. In the Commonwealth of Virginia’s capital, Richmond, where the General Assembly meets, the murder rate is 43 people per 100,000 of the population, making Richmond the city with the third-highest murder rate in the nation, according to a 2005 FBI report.


    What about black education in Virginia? According to the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), black education is a disgrace. In 2003, 51 percent of black eighth-graders scored below basic; 49 percent at or above basic; of these, only 11 percent scored proficient. For black fourth-graders, the scores were 34, 66, and 13 percent, respectively.
    In 2002 in reading, 38 percent of black eighth-graders scored below basic, with 62 percent at or above basic and 15 percent scoring proficient. For fourth-graders, the scores were 53, 47, and 15 percent, respectively.
    Below basic is the category the NAEP uses for students unable to display even partial mastery of knowledge and skills fundamental for proficient work at their grade level.


    Given this extreme academic incompetence, one shouldn’t be surprised by the 2002 Virginia State Education Profile showing that the median combined SAT score for black students is a disgraceful 848 out of 1600, 210 points below the white median, and the white median is nothing to write home about.


    The next time the Virginia General Assembly gets into an apologetic mood and wants to pass another resolution aimed at its black citizens, here are my suggestions: The Commonwealth of Virginia apologizes to its black citizens for not protecting them from criminals who prey upon them and make their lives a daily nightmare.


    The Commonwealth also apologizes for our government-sanctioned school system that delivers fraudulent education, thereby consigning many of its black citizens to the bottom rungs of the economic ladder.
    Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. He has authored more than 150 publications, including many in scholarly journals, and has frequently given expert testimony before Congressional committees on public policy issues ranging from labor policy to taxation and spending.

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    Elite Member JamieElizabeth's Avatar
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    Default Virginia "apologizes" for slavery

    Regrets for Slavery

    Opinion Editorial by Walter Williams - Mar 9, 2007
    Both chambers of the Commonwealth of Virginia’s General Assembly passed a resolution saying government-sanctioned slavery “ranks as the most horrendous of all depredations of human rights and violations of our founding ideals in our nation’s history.”
    “And. . . the abolition of slavery was followed by. . . systematic discrimination, enforced segregation, and other insidious institutions and practices toward Americans of African descent that were rooted in racism, racial bias, and racial misunderstanding.”
    The General Assembly also expressed regret for the “exploitation of Native Americans.”


    Isn't that nice? I agree that slavery was an abomination, but I’m going to be even more generous than Virginia’s General Assembly. I regret the murder of an estimated 61 million people whom the former USSR executed, slaughtered, starved, beat, or tortured to death.


    I also regret the Chinese government's slaughter of 45 million Chinese; Hitler’s slaughter of 6 million Jews; the Khmer Rouge’s murder of 2 million Cambodians; the half a million Ugandans murdered by Idi Amin’s death squads; the million Hutus and Tutsis murdered in Rwanda’s genocidal bloodbath; and slavery that still exists in the Sudan and Mauritania.
    All of these, and many more, are horrible injustices at least as horrible as the slavery that existed in the U.S. But after all the regrets and apologies for injustices, what comes next? Let’s examine Virginia's statement of regret with an eye toward what it might mean.


    I can personally relate to the Virginia General Assembly’s declaration. My great-grandparents were slaves in the Virginia cities of Chase City and Newport News. The General Assembly’s statement of regret for slavery means absolutely nothing to me. If anything, it’s nothing less than a cheap insult and capitulation of white delegates to black hustlers.

    Possibly, the whites who voted in support of the declaration were mau-maued into it or they felt guilt over our history of slavery. In any case, they should know that their actions mean little in dealing with the day-to-day plight of many black Virginians — which has nothing to do with slavery.


    The U.S. murder rate is 5.6 people per 100,000 of the population. In the Commonwealth of Virginia’s capital, Richmond, where the General Assembly meets, the murder rate is 43 people per 100,000 of the population, making Richmond the city with the third-highest murder rate in the nation, according to a 2005 FBI report.


    What about black education in Virginia? According to the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), black education is a disgrace. In 2003, 51 percent of black eighth-graders scored below basic; 49 percent at or above basic; of these, only 11 percent scored proficient. For black fourth-graders, the scores were 34, 66, and 13 percent, respectively.
    In 2002 in reading, 38 percent of black eighth-graders scored below basic, with 62 percent at or above basic and 15 percent scoring proficient. For fourth-graders, the scores were 53, 47, and 15 percent, respectively.
    Below basic is the category the NAEP uses for students unable to display even partial mastery of knowledge and skills fundamental for proficient work at their grade level.


    Given this extreme academic incompetence, one shouldn’t be surprised by the 2002 Virginia State Education Profile showing that the median combined SAT score for black students is a disgraceful 848 out of 1600, 210 points below the white median, and the white median is nothing to write home about.


    The next time the Virginia General Assembly gets into an apologetic mood and wants to pass another resolution aimed at its black citizens, here are my suggestions: The Commonwealth of Virginia apologizes to its black citizens for not protecting them from criminals who prey upon them and make their lives a daily nightmare.


    The Commonwealth also apologizes for our government-sanctioned school system that delivers fraudulent education, thereby consigning many of its black citizens to the bottom rungs of the economic ladder.
    Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. He has authored more than 150 publications, including many in scholarly journals, and has frequently given expert testimony before Congressional committees on public policy issues ranging from labor policy to taxation and spending.
    Last edited by JamieElizabeth; March 9th, 2007 at 02:55 PM.

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    again.. what is with these 3 people?

    Try this: cookie756.html

    or hell, even CNN.com

    Something a little more thought out and balanced.
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

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    Virginia expresses 'profound regret' for slavery

    POSTED: 9:09 p.m. EST, February 24, 2007

    • House approves apology 96-0; Senate passes with unanimous voice vote
    • Sponsors say they know of no other state that has apologized for slavery
    • Measure also expresses regret for "exploitation of Native Americans"
    • Virginia celebrating 400th anniversary of Jamestown, where slaves arrived


    RICHMOND, Virginia (AP) -- Meeting on the grounds of the former Confederate Capitol, the Virginia General Assembly voted unanimously Saturday to express "profound regret" for the state's role in slavery.

    Sponsors of the resolution say they know of no other state that has apologized for slavery, although Missouri lawmakers are considering such a measure. The resolution does not carry the weight of law but sends an important symbolic message, supporters said.
    (What does "carry the weight of Law" mean?)

    "This session will be remembered for a lot of things, but 20 years hence I suspect one
    of those things will be the fact that we came together and passed this resolution," said Delegate A. Donald McEachin, a Democrat who sponsored it in the House of Delegates.

    The resolution passed the House 96-0 and cleared the 40-member Senate on a unanimous voice vote. It does not require Gov. Timothy M. Kaine's approval.
    The measure also expressed regret for "the exploitation of Native Americans."
    The resolution was introduced as Virginia begins its celebration of the 400th anniversary of Jamestown, where the first Africans arrived in 1619. Richmond, home to a popular boulevard lined with statues of Confederate heroes, later became another point of arrival for Africans and a slave-trade hub.

    The resolution says government-sanctioned slavery "ranks as the most horrendous of all depredations of human rights and violations of our founding ideals in our nation's history, and the abolition of slavery was followed by systematic discrimination, enforced segregation, and other insidious institutions and practices toward Americans of African descent that were rooted in racism, racial bias, and racial misunderstanding."


    In Virginia, black voter turnout was suppressed with a poll tax and literacy tests before those practices were struck down by federal courts, and state leaders responded to federally ordered school desegregation with a "Massive Resistance" movement in the 1950s and early '60s.
    The apology is the latest in a series of strides Virginia has made in overcoming its segregationist past. Virginia was the first state to elect a black governor -- L. Douglas Wilder in 1989 -- and the Legislature took a step toward atoning for Massive Resistance in 2004 by creating a scholarship fund for blacks whose schools were shut down between 1954 and 1964.
    Among those voting for the measure was Delegate Frank D. Hargrove, an 80-year-old Republican who infuriated black leaders last month by saying "black citizens should get over" slavery.

    After enduring a barrage of criticism, Hargrove successfully co-sponsored a resolution calling on Virginia to celebrate "Juneteenth," a holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States.


    Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
    Virginia expresses 'profound regret' for slavery - CNN.com
    Last edited by JamieElizabeth; March 9th, 2007 at 02:41 PM.

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