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Thread: In US, record numbers are plunged into poverty: report

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    Elite Member celeb_2006's Avatar
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    Default In US, record numbers are plunged into poverty: report

    (anyone out there still feel sorry for britney and her spoiled celebuturd ilk?):

    In US, record numbers are plunged into poverty: report - Yahoo! News

    The gulf between rich and poor in the United States is yawning wider than ever, and the number of extremely impoverished is at a three-decade high, a report out Saturday found.
    Based on the latest available US census data from 2005, the McClatchy Newspapers analysis found that almost 16 million Americans live in "deep or severe poverty" defined as a family of four with two children earning less than 9,903 dollars -- one half the federal poverty line figure.
    For individuals the "deep poverty" threshold was an income under 5,080 dollars a year.
    "The McClatchy analysis found that the number of severely poor Americans grew by 26 percent from 2000 to 2005," the US newspaper chain reported.
    "That's 56 percent faster than the overall poverty population grew in the same period," it noted.
    The surge in poverty comes alongside an unusual economic expansion.
    "Worker productivity has increased dramatically since the brief recession of 2001, but wages and job growth have lagged behind. At the same time, the share of national income going to corporate profits has dwarfed the amount going to wages and salaries," the study found.
    "That helps explain why the median household income for working-age families, adjusted for inflation, has fallen for five straight years.
    "These and other factors have helped push 43 percent of the nation's 37 million poor people into deep poverty -- the highest rate since at least 1975. The share of poor Americans in deep poverty has climbed slowly but steadily over the last three decades," the report said.
    It quoted an American Journal of Preventive Medicine study as having found that since 2000, the number of severely poor -- far below basic poverty terms -- in the United States has grown "more than any other segment of the population."
    "That was the exact opposite of what we anticipated when we began," said Dr. Steven Woolf of Virginia Commonwealth University, a study co-author.
    "We're not seeing as much moderate poverty as a proportion of the population. What we're seeing is a dramatic growth of severe poverty."
    US social programs are minimal compared to those of western Europe and Canada. The United States has a population of 301 million, but more than 45 million US citizens have no health insurance.

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    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
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    Thumbs down Record numbers plunged into severe poverty in US

    WASHINGTON (AFP) - The gulf between rich and poor in the United States is yawning wider than ever, and the number of extremely impoverished is at a three-decade high, a report out Saturday found.

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    Based on the latest available US census data from 2005, the McClatchy Newspapers analysis found that almost 16 million Americans live in "deep or severe poverty" defined as a family of four with two children earning less than 9,903 dollars -- one half the federal poverty line figure.

    For individuals the "deep poverty" threshold was an income under 5,080 dollars a year.

    "The McClatchy analysis found that the number of severely poor Americans grew by 26 percent from 2000 to 2005," the US newspaper chain reported.

    "That's 56 percent faster than the overall poverty population grew in the same period," it noted.

    The surge in poverty comes alongside an unusual economic expansion.

    "Worker productivity has increased dramatically since the brief recession of 2001, but wages and job growth have lagged behind. At the same time, the share of national income going to corporate profits has dwarfed the amount going to wages and salaries," the study found.

    "That helps explain why the median household income for working-age families, adjusted for inflation, has fallen for five straight years.

    "These and other factors have helped push 43 percent of the nation's 37 million poor people into deep poverty -- the highest rate since at least 1975. The share of poor Americans in deep poverty has climbed slowly but steadily over the last three decades," the report said.

    It quoted an American Journal of Preventive Medicine study as having found that since 2000, the number of severely poor -- far below basic poverty terms -- in the United States has grown "more than any other segment of the population."

    "That was the exact opposite of what we anticipated when we began," said Dr. Steven Woolf of Virginia Commonwealth University, a study co-author.

    "We're not seeing as much moderate poverty as a proportion of the population. What we're seeing is a dramatic growth of severe poverty."

    US social programs are minimal compared to those of western Europe and Canada. The United States has a population of 301 million, but more than 45 million US citizens have no health insurance.

    In US, record numbers are plunged into poverty: report - Yahoo! News
    Uh well duh.. thats what happens when you give trickle-down economics and tax breaks for the wealthy another try. It didn't work last time, why the fuck would it this time?
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

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    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Glad you posted this. I saw this posted in another forum and was thinking about posting it myself. Gloomy as hell.

    this part sums it up for me:

    "Worker productivity has increased dramatically since the brief recession of 2001, but wages and job growth have lagged behind. At the same time, the share of national income going to corporate profits has dwarfed the amount going to wages and salaries," the study found


    fucking coporate bastards!!!!!
    Don't slap me, cause I'm not in the mood!

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    SVZ
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    Is raising minimum wage really going to help?

    I realize it's still behind, but won't that just make things even more expensive?

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    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
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    crap, someone posted it 3 lines down already.. totally missed it..
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

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    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SVZ View Post
    Is raising minimum wage really going to help?

    I realize it's still behind, but won't that just make things even more expensive?
    the problem is with corporate profits. Why are we having record corporate profits(think the oil company's) but nothing is going to the workers..just the corporate heads and the stockholders(wealthier people anyway). And sure raising wages will make things more expensive-if(and you know it will be this way) the corporations just pass the expense on to the consumer by raising prices rather than shaving a little off of their record company profits.

    Also this thread looks like a duplicate...and they should be merged..right?
    Don't slap me, cause I'm not in the mood!

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    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grimmlok View Post
    crap, someone posted it 3 lines down already.. totally missed it..
    Hell I missed it too until after I posted in this one.
    Don't slap me, cause I'm not in the mood!

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    Elite Member JamieElizabeth's Avatar
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    Welfare state growing despite overhauls

    By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER, Associated Press Writer 1 hour, 15 minutes ago

    WASHINGTON - The welfare state is bigger than ever despite a decade of policies designed to wean poor people from public aid.

    The number of families receiving cash benefits from welfare has plummeted since the government imposed time limits on the payments a decade ago. But other programs for the poor, including Medicaid, food stamps and disability benefits, are bursting with new enrollees.
    The result, according to an Associated Press analysis: Nearly one in six people rely on some form of public assistance, a larger share than at any time since the government started measuring two decades ago.

    Critics of the welfare overhaul say the numbers offer fresh evidence that few former recipients have become self-sufficient, even though millions have moved from welfare to work. They say the vast majority have been forced into low-paying jobs without benefits and few opportunities to advance.

    "If the goal of welfare reform was to get people off the welfare rolls, bravo," said Vivyan Adair, a former welfare recipient who is now an assistant professor of women's studies at Hamilton College in upstate New York. "If the goal was to reduce poverty and give people economic and job stability, it was not a success."

    Proponents of the changes in welfare say programs that once discouraged work now offer support to people in low-paying jobs. They point to expanded eligibility rules for food stamps and Medicaid, the health insurance program for the poor, that enable people to keep getting benefits even after they start working.

    "I don't have any problems with those programs growing, and indeed, they were intended to grow," said Ron Haskins, a former adviser to President Bush on welfare policy.
    "We've taken the step of getting way more people into the labor force and they have taken a huge step toward self-sufficiency. What is the other choice?" he asked.

    In the early 1990s, critics contended the welfare system encouraged unemployment and promoted single-parent families. Welfare recipients, mostly single mothers, could lose benefits if they earned too much money or if they lived with the father of their children.
    Major changes in welfare were enacted in 1996, requiring most recipients to work but allowing them to continue some benefits after they started jobs. The law imposed a five-year limit on cash payments for most people in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program, or TANF. Some states have shorter time limits.

    Nia Foster fits the pattern of dependence on government programs. She stopped getting cash welfare payments in the late 1990s and has moved from one clerical job to another. None provided medical benefits.

    The 32-year-old mother of two from Cincinnati said she supports her family with help from food stamps and Medicaid.
    Foster said she did not get any job training when she left welfare. She earned her high-school equivalency last year at a community college.
    "If you want to get educated or want to succeed, the welfare office don't care," Foster said. "I don't think they really care what you do once the benefits are gone."
    Foster now works in a tax office, a seasonal job that will end after April 15. She hopes to enroll at the University of Cincinnati this spring and would like to study accounting. She is waiting to find out if she qualifies for enough financial aid to cover tuition.
    "I like data processing, something where it's a bunch of invoices and you have to key them in," Foster said. "I want to be an accountant so bad."

    Shannon Stanfield took a different, less-traveled path from welfare, thanks to a generous program that offered her a chance to get a college education.
    Stanfield, 36, was cleaning houses to support her two young children four years ago when she learned about a program for welfare recipients at nearby Hamilton College, a private liberal arts school in Clinton, N.Y.

    "At the time I was living in a pretty run-down apartment," said Stanfield, who was getting welfare payments, Medicaid and food stamps. "It wasn't healthy."
    The program, called the Access Project, accepts about 25 welfare-eligible parents a year. Hamilton waives tuition for first-year students and the program supplements financial aid in later years. Students get a host of social and career services, including help finding internships and jobs and financial assistance in times of crisis.

    About 140 former welfare recipients have completed the program and none still relies on government programs for the poor, said Adair, the Hamilton professor who started the Access Project in 2001.
    Stanfield, who still gets Medicaid and food stamps, plans to graduate in May with a bachelor's degree in theater. She wants to be a teacher.
    "I slowly built up my confidence through education," Stanfield said. "I can't honestly tell you how much it has changed my life."
    Programs such as the Access Project are not cheap, which is one reason they are rare. Tuition and fees run about $35,000 a year at Hamilton, and the program's annual budget is between $250,000 and $500,000, Adair said.
    In 2005, about 5.1 million people received monthly welfare payments from TANF and similar state programs, a 60 percent drop from a decade before.
    But other government programs grew, offsetting the declines.

    About 44 million people — nearly one in six in the country — relied on government services for the poor in 2003, according to the most recent statistics compiled by the Census Bureau. That compares with about 39 million in 1996.
    Also, the number of people getting government aid continues to increase, according to more recent enrollment figures from individual programs.
    Medicaid rolls alone topped 45 million people in 2005, pushed up in part by rising health care costs and fewer employers offering benefits. Nearly 26 million people a month received food stamps that year.

    Cash welfare recipients, by comparison, peaked at 14.2 million people in 1994.
    There is much debate over whether those leaving welfare for work should be offered more opportunities for training and education, so they do not have to settle for low-paying jobs that keep them dependent on government programs.
    "We said get a job, any job," said Rep. Jim McDermott (news, bio, voting record), chairman of the House subcommittee that oversees welfare issues. "And now we expect them to be making it on these minimum-wage jobs."
    McDermott, D-Wash., said stricter work requirements enacted last year, when Congress renewed the welfare overhaul law, will make it even more difficult for welfare recipients to get sufficient training to land good-paying jobs.

    But people who support the welfare changes say former recipients often fare better economically if they start working, even in low-paying jobs, before entering education programs.
    "What many people on TANF need first is the confidence that they can succeed in the workplace and to develop the habits of work," said Wade Horn, the Bush administration's point man on welfare overhaul.
    "Also, many TANF recipients didn't have a lot of success in the classroom," Horn said. "If you want to improve the confidence of a TANF recipient, putting them in the classroom, where they failed in the past, that is not likely to increase their confidence."
    Horn noted that employment among poor single mothers is up and child poverty rates are down since the welfare changes in 1996, though the numbers have worsened since the start of the decade.

    Horn, however, said he would like to see local welfare agencies provide more education and training to people who have already moved from welfare to work.
    "I think more attention has to be paid to helping those families move up the income scale, increasing their independence of other government welfare programs," Horn said.
    "The true goal of welfare to work programs should be self-sufficiency."


    Welfare state growing despite overhauls - Yahoo! News
    Last edited by JamieElizabeth; February 25th, 2007 at 06:08 PM.

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    Hit By Ban Bus! AliceInWonderland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grimmlok View Post
    Uh well duh.. thats what happens when you give trickle-down economics and tax breaks for the wealthy another try. It didn't work last time, why the fuck would it this time?
    exactly. this is so disgusting and yet I see it all around me everyday in L.A. L.A. is the land of the 'haves' and 'have-nots' and apparantly this is spreading all over the country. It really sickens me to no end. Do we really want to end up like Mexico? b/c thats where we're heading! and then where will our poor run off to for work? Canada?? to use their healthcare and such???
    sometimes I really hate this country.

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    Elite Member darksithbunny's Avatar
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    I wonder how many of them are illegal aliens?

    I am starting to see it around here. I know of a Walmart where people are living in their cars. In their cars. I stopped and ask one of them. This really nice lady with 3 kids. She doesn't make enough and apparently because she owns a car, a few savings bonds, and a lawyer fighting in a divorce,(and her feeling that she was the wrong color) she doesn't qualify for welfare!

    I felt so helpless to help her. I did direct her to Catholic charities and last week when I talked to her again, she said they had found her an apartment that she can afford the rent. At least she got help. I feel real bad for the rest of them over there in the Walmart parking lot.

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    Hit By Ban Bus! pacific breeze's Avatar
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    Further proof, if any were needed, that "trickle down" economics don't work. So much for "compassionate conservatism." What a crock, all of it.

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    Elite Member JamieElizabeth's Avatar
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    Hierarchies in society have always existed, it's very modern the way that we all want to have so much. And we all go to Wal-Mart to get everything we need in a cute little package.

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    Hit By Ban Bus! pacific breeze's Avatar
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    Yes, but because a hierarchy was unfair in the past does not mean we have to continue to embrace it. The goal is to make the world a better place for ALL, not for just less than 1 per cent who are greedy and selfish beyond belief.

    And Alice, several right-wing Neanderthal govts. up here who consider Bush as their unofficial leader, are ruining it for us too. Don't count on it being any better up here if these asshats aren't booted from power.

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    Elite Member Mr. Authority's Avatar
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    But...but the economy is BOOMING! Just this past week I saw a new Wendy's open up and their hiring for cashiers and fry cooks!


    The only jobs that'll be available will be retail and fast-food slave jobs. It's not a good economy if so many people are working 2-3 jobs just to get by. Yet we still have "Compassionate Conservatives" preaching about cutting social security and getting rid of welfare. They whine about poverty and the poor not taking care of themselves, yet they don't want the poor to get any help. WTF?!?

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    Hit By Ban Bus! AliceInWonderland's Avatar
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    no i dont want to be like mexico or many other countries like that where a very few wealthy families/individuals run everything while the masses of poor are kept in the dark and suffering. its not right and its not fair and not why this country was founded.

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