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Thread: Fact sheet about the health care bill: how awful it is indeed

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    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
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    Angry Fact sheet about the health care bill: how awful it is indeed


    The Firedoglake health care team has been covering the debate in congress since it began last year. The health care bill will come up for a vote in the House on Sunday, and as Nancy Pelosi works to wrangle votes, we’ve been running a detailed whip count on where every member of Congress stands, updated throughout the day.

    We’ve also taken a detailed look at the bill, and have come up with 18 often stated myths about this health care reform bill.

    Real health care reform is the thing we’ve fought for from the start. It is desperately needed. But this bill falls short on many levels, and hurts many people more than it helps.

    A middle class family of four making $66,370 will be forced to pay $5,243 per year for insurance. After basic necessities, this leaves them with $8,307 in discretionary income — out of which they would have to cover clothing, credit card and other debt, child care and education costs, in addition to $5,882 in annual out-of-pocket medical expenses for which families will be responsible. Many families who are already struggling to get by would be better off saving the $5,243 in insurance costs and paying their medical expenses directly, rather than being forced to by coverage they can’t afford the co-pays on.

    In addition, there is already a booming movement across the country to challenge the mandate. Thirty-three states already have bills moving through their houses, and the Idaho governor was the first to sign it into law yesterday. In Virginia it passed through both a Democratic House and Senate, and the governor will sign it soon. It will be on the ballot in Arizona in 2010, and is headed in that direction for many more. Republican senators like Dick Lugar are already asking their state attorney generals to challenge it. There are two GOP think tanks actively helping states in their efforts, and there is a booming messaging infrastructure that covers it beat-by-beat.

    Whether Steny Hoyer believes the legality of the bill will prevail in court or not is moot, it could easily become the “gay marriage” of 2010, with one key difference: there will be no one on the other side passionately opposing it. The GOP is preparing to use it as a massive turn-out vehicle, and it not only threatens representatives in states like Florida, Colorado and Ohio where these challenges will likely be on the ballot — it threatens gubernatorial and down-ticket races as well. Artur Davis, running for governor of Alabama, is already being put on the spot about it.

    While details are limited, there is apparently a “Plan B” alternative that the White House was considering, which would evidently expand existing programs — Medicaid and SCHIP. It would cover half the people at a quarter of the price, but it would not force an unbearable financial burden to those who are already struggling to get by. Because it creates no new infrastructure for the purpose of funneling money to private insurance companies, there is no need for Bart Stupak’s or Ben Nelson’s language dealing with abortion — which satisfies the concerns of pro-life members of Congress, as well as women who are looking at the biggest blow to women’s reproductive rights in 35 years with the passage of this bill. Both programs are already covered under existing law, the Hyde amendment.

    But perhaps most profoundly, the bill does not mandate that people pay 8% of their annual income to private insurance companies or face a penalty of up to 2% — which the IRS would collect. As Marcy Wheeler noted in an important post on the entitled “Health Care on the Road to NeoFeudalism,” we stand on the precipice of doing something truly radical in our government, by demanding that Americans pay almost as much money to private insurance companies as they do in federal taxes:


    When this passes, it will become clear that Congress is no longer the sovereign of this nation. Rather, the corporations dictating the laws will be.

    I understand the temptation to offer 30 million people health care. What I don’t understand is the nonchalance with which we’re about to fundamentally shift the relationships of governance in doing so.



    Myth 1. This is a universal health care bill.


    Truth 1. The bill is neither universal health care nor universal health insurance.

    Per the CBO:

    Total uninsured in 2019 with no bill: 54 million
    Total uninsured in 2019 with Senate bill: 24 million (44%)


    Myth 2. Insurance companies hate this bill

    Truth 2. This bill is almost identical to the plan written by AHIP, the insurance company trade association, in 2009. The original Senate Finance Committee bill was authored by a former Wellpoint VP. Since Congress released the first of its health care bills on October 30, 2009, health care stocks have risen 28.35%.


    Myth 3. The bill will significantly bring down insurance premiums for most Americans.


    Truth 3. The bill will not bring down premiums significantly, and certainly not the $2,500/year that the President promised.

    Annual premiums in 2016, status quo / with bill:

    Small group market, single: $7,800 / $7,800

    Small group market, family: $19,3oo / $19,200

    Large Group market, single: $7,400 / $7,300

    Large group market, family: $21,100 / $21,300

    Individual market, single: $5,500 / $5,800*

    Individual market, family: $13,100 / $15,200*


    Myth 4. The bill will make health care affordable for middle class Americans.

    Truth 4. The bill will impose a financial hardship on middle class Americans who will be forced to buy a product that they can’t afford to use.

    A family of four making $66,370 will be forced to pay $5,243 per year for insurance. After basic necessities, this leaves them with $8,307 in discretionary income — out of which they would have to cover clothing, credit card and other debt, child care and education costs, in addition to $5,882 in annual out-of-pocket medical expenses for which families will be responsible.


    Myth 5. This plan is similar to the Massachusetts plan, which makes health care affordable.

    Truth 5. Many Massachusetts residents forgo health care because they can’t afford it.

    A 2009 study by the state of Massachusetts found that:

    21% of residents forgo medical treatment because they can’t afford it, including 12% of children

    18% have health insurance but can’t afford to use it


    Myth 6. This bill provide health care to 31 million people who are currently uninsured.


    Truth 6. This bill will mandate that millions of people who are currently uninsured must purchase insurance from private companies, or the IRS will collect up to 2% of their annual income in penalties. Some will be assisted with government subsidies.


    Myth 7. You can keep the insurance you have if you like it.

    Truth 7. The excise tax will result in employers switching to plans with higher co-pays and fewer covered services. Older, less healthy employees with employer-based health care will be forced to pay much more in out-of-pocket expenses than they do now.


    Myth 8. The “excise tax” will encourage employers to reduce the scope of health care benefits, and they will pass the savings on to employees in the form of higher wages.


    Truth 8. There is insufficient evidence that employers pass savings from reduced benefits on to employees.


    Myth 9. This bill employs nearly every cost control idea available to bring down costs.


    Truth 9. This bill does not bring down costs and leaves out nearly every key cost control measure, including:

    Public Option ($25-$110 billion)
    Medicare buy-in
    Drug reimportation ($19 billion)
    Medicare drug price negotiation ($300 billion)
    Shorter pathway to generic biologics ($71 billion)


    Myth 10. The bill will require big companies like WalMart to provide insurance for their employees


    Truth 10. The bill was written so that most WalMart employees will qualify for subsidies, and taxpayers will pick up a large portion of the cost of their coverage.


    Myth 11. The bill “bends the cost curve” on health care.


    Truth 11. The bill ignored proven ways to cut health care costs and still leaves 24 million people uninsured, all while slightly raising total annual costs by $234 million in 2019.

    “Bends the cost curve” is a misleading and trivial claim, as the US would still spend far more for care than other advanced countries.

    In 2009, health care costs were 17.3% of GDP.

    Annual cost of health care in 2019, status quo: $4,670.6 billion (20.8% of GDP)

    Annual cost of health care in 2019, Senate bill: $4,693.5 billion (20.9% of GDP)


    Myth 12. The bill will provide immediate access to insurance for Americans who are uninsured because of a pre-existing condition.

    Truth 12. Access to the “high risk pool” is limited and the pool is underfunded. It will cover few people, and will run out of money in 2011 or 2012.

    Only those who have been uninsured for more than six months will qualify for the high risk pool. Only 0.7% of those without insurance now will get coverage, and the CMS report estimates it will run out of funding by 2011 or 2012.

    Myth 13. The bill prohibits dropping people in individual plans from coverage when they get sick.

    Truth 13. The bill does not empower a regulatory body to keep people from being dropped when they’re sick. There are already many states that have laws on the books prohibiting people from being dropped when they’re sick, but without an enforcement mechanism, there is little to hold the insurance companies in check.


    Myth 14. The bill ensures consumers have access to an effective internal and external appeals process to challenge new insurance plan decisions.


    Truth 14. The “internal appeals process” is in the hands of the insurance companies themselves, and the “external” one is up to each state.
    Ensuring that consumers have access to “internal appeals” simply means the insurance companies have to review their own decisions. And it is the responsibility of each state to provide an “external appeals process,” as there is neither funding nor a regulatory mechanism for enforcement at the federal level.


    Myth 15. This bill will stop insurance companies from hiking rates 30%-40% per year.


    This bill does not limit insurance company rate hikes. Private insurers continue to be exempt from anti-trust laws, and are free to raise rates without fear of competition in many areas of the country.


    Myth 16. When the bill passes, people will begin receiving benefits under this bill immediately


    Truth 16. Most provisions in this bill, such as an end to the ban on pre-existing conditions for adults, do not take effect until 2014.

    Six months from the date of passage, children could not be excluded from coverage due to pre-existing conditions, though insurance companies could charge more to cover them. Children would also be allowed to stay on their parents’ plans until age 26. There will be an elimination of lifetime coverage limits, a high risk pool for those who have been uninsured for more than 6 months, and community health centers will start receiving money.


    Myth 17. The bill creates a pathway for single payer.


    Truth 17. Bernie Sanders’ provision in the Senate bill does not start until 2017, and does not cover the Department of Labor, so no, it doesn’t create a pathway for single payer.

    Obama told Dennis Kucinich that the Ohio Representative’s amendment is similar to Bernie Sanders’ provision in the Senate bill, and creates a pathway to single payer. Since the waiver does not start until 2017, and does not cover the Department of Labor, it is nearly impossible to see how it gets around the ERISA laws that stand in the way of any practical state single payer system.


    Myth 18. The bill will end medical bankruptcy and provide all Americans with peace of mind.


    Most people with medical bankruptcies already have insurance, and out-of-pocket expenses will continue to be a burden on the middle class.

    In 2009, 1.5 million Americans declared bankruptcy
    -Of those, 62% were medically related
    -Three-quarters of those had health insurance
    -The Obama bill leaves 24 million without insurance
    -The maximum yearly out-of-pocket limit for a family will be $11,900 (PDF) on top of premiums
    -A family with serious medical problems that last for a few years could easily be financially crushed by medical costs


    Documentation:

    March 11, Letter from Doug Elmendorf to Harry Reid (PDF)
    The AHIP Plan in Context, Igor Volsky; The Max Baucus WellPoint/Liz Fowler Plan, Marcy Wheeler
    CBO Score, 11-30-2009
    “Affordable” Health Care, Marcy Wheeler
    Gruber Doesn’t Reveal That 21% of Massachusetts Residents Can’t Afford Health Care, Marcy Wheeler; Massachusetts Survey (PDF)
    Health Care on the Road to Neo-Feudalism, Marcy Wheeler
    CMS: Excise Tax on Insurance Will Make Your Insurane Coverage Worse and Cause Almost No Reduction in NHE, Jon Walker
    Employer Health Costs Do Not Drive Wage Trends, Lawrence Mishel
    CBO Estimates Show Public Plan With Higher Savings Rate, Congress Daily; Drug Importation Amendment Likely This Week, Politico; Medicare Part D IAF; A Monopoloy on Biologics Will Drain Health Care Resources, Lancet Student
    MaxTax Is a Plan to Use Our Taxes to Reward Wal-Mart for Keeping Its Workers in Poverty, Marcy Wheeler
    Estimated Financial Effects of the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2009,” as Proposed by the Senate Majority Leader on November 18, 2009, CMS (PDF)
    ibid
    ibid
    ibid
    Health insurance companies hang onto their antitrust exemption, Protect Consumer Justice.org
    What passage of health care reform would mean for the average American, DC Examiner
    How to get a State Single Payer Opt-Out as Part of Reconciliation, Jon Walker
    Medical bills prompt more than 60 percent of U.S. bankruptcies, CNN.com; The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Section‐by‐Section Analysis (PDF)

    Fact Sheet: The Truth About the Health Care Bill | FDL Action
    Good freaking god, what a nightmare scam
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    Elite Member witchcurlgirl's Avatar
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    A crap sandwich.



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    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
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    Really, and this is what the "progressive" members of congress folded for?

    It's hideous.
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    Elite Member greysfang's Avatar
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    I really like how this is broken down so its easy for most people to read, yet how widely will it be distributed? I wish more people cared enough to reserach things lke this.
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    Elite Member Cali's Avatar
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    This little fact sheet is a total load of bullhockey.

    The NY Times has a much more accurate one: Proposed Changes in the Final Health Care Bill - Interactive Graphic - NYTimes.com

    I'm still going through the arguments made thus far, but so far I've found this, using the NY Times piece to correct:
    A middle class family of four making $66,370 will be forced to pay $5,243 per year for insurance. After basic necessities, this leaves them with $8,307 in discretionary income — out of which they would have to cover clothing, credit card and other debt, child care and education costs, in addition to $5,882 in annual out-of-pocket medical expenses for which families will be responsible. Many families who are already struggling to get by would be better off saving the $5,243 in insurance costs and paying their medical expenses directly, rather than being forced to by coverage they can’t afford the co-pays on.
    How the heck do they figure these numbers? AFAIK, its wrong. The stated income would put them at around 300% below the federal poverty line. The numbers are based on a sliding scale and the exact figure isn't given for that income, so I'm going to guess they are at about 300% below the federal poverty line.

    So they'd actually pay aprox. 2% - 4% of their income on health insurance, so $1,99.11 - $2,654.80

    Myth 6. This bill provide health care to 31 million people who are currently uninsured.
    In actuality, they could join the public plan, which is:
    - States would form their own exchanges. Several states could join together to form a regional exchange.

    - Open to people who do not have qualifying coverage through an employer or a public program.

    - Open to employers with 100 or fewer workers, but states could allow employers with 50 or fewer workers to participate until 2016. Starting in 2017, states could allow employers with more than 100 employees to participate in the exchange.

    Myth #7: Older, less healthy employees with employer-based health care will be forced to pay much more in out-of-pocket expenses than they do now.
    In actuality:
    - The federal government would cover 80 percent of the cost of a retiree’s medical claims of more than $15,000 through 2013, with a cap at $90,000, at which point the employer’s plan would pay the rest.

    - The proposal would limit out-of-pocket spending at $5,950 a year for individuals and $11,900 for families.

    - Premiums for older people cannot be more than three times the premium for young adults.

    Myth # 8 Truth 9. This bill does not bring down costs and leaves out nearly every key cost control measure, including:
    Public Option ($25-$110 billion)
    In actuality, there is a public plan:

    The federal Office of Personnel Management, which provides health benefits to federal employees, would sign contracts with insurers to offer at least two national health plans to individuals, families and small businesses. The new plans would be separate from the program for federal employees, and premiums would be calculated separately. At least one of the plans would have to operate on a nonprofit basis.

    Myth 10. The bill will require big companies like WalMart to provide insurance for their employees
    In actuality:
    - Employers with 50 or more full-time workers would pay a penalty if they do not offer health benefits and if any of the workers obtain subsidized coverage through the new health insurance exchanges.

    Penalty: $2,000 for each full time worker in the company, but would exempt the first 30 employees while calculating the penalty. For example, an employer with 53 workers would pay the penalty for 23 workers, or $46,000.

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    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
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    Nevermind that most of the info was taken from government sources... interesting that it's bull
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    Cali, what you posted is more of the way I expected things would go based on campaign promises and such. It's really hard to discern what's true and isn't true. Does anyone have a link to the most recent copy of the bill?

    I just don't understand why it is so difficult for the federal government to get bids from Cigna, United, Aetna, and all the top insurers for a nationwide insurance plan to be offered to those without employer coverage, or as an option for those who feel that their employer coverage is too expensive. To put it out there as $X for single coverage, $X+Y for family coverage, and give people an opportunity to buy this coverage, which presumably would be cheaper than going on their own. People over a certain income would pay the premiums, below a certain income would be subsidized or free. That's NOT government-run insurance, and it's relatively simple to administer. That's all people really want, is a chance to be in a pool to get reasonable rates.

    In fact, I don't understand why I couldn't get health insurance through my credit union, for example. There's a huge pool right there.

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    Elite Member Little Wombat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cali View Post
    This little fact sheet is a total load of bullhockey.

    The NY Times has a much more accurate one: Proposed Changes in the Final Health Care Bill - Interactive Graphic - NYTimes.com
    Thanks for posting all this, Cali.
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    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
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    Yeah, I'll be trusting Jane Hamsher over the NYtimes. She's been utterly prescient about the whole thing.
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    Elite Member Cali's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grimmlok View Post
    Nevermind that most of the info was taken from government sources... interesting that it's bull
    Frankly, I wouldn't know beyond what you posted here. Because every single time I try to view something on Firedoglake, it crashes my web browser. And not just Firefox, but Safari and Internet Explorer as well. And consistently for the past month.

    The word 'amateurish' comes to mind.

    ETA-
    Quote Originally Posted by Grimmlok View Post
    Yeah, I'll be trusting Jane Hamsher over the NYtimes. She's been utterly prescient about the whole thing.
    Also- funny you should say that. I wonder what Ms. Hamsher's educational background is in?

    Oh, that's right. She doesn't even seem to have A college degree. At best, she has one in something film-related from USC. Not denigrating such a degree in any regard, but to value the opinion of a film producer over the NY Times on an issue that deals with the incredibly complicated underpinnings of our government, economy and health care system? No.

    And on that note, a rant: I just have zero patience for the faction of my party (Democrat) that is essentially cut-off-the-nose-despite-the-face. This bill is a START. A fantastic start. for so many people including myself. I was uninsured until a few days ago when HIPAA protections allowed me to FINALLY get a health insurance plan. Without HIPAA, I'd have been up shitcreek without a paddle, seriously.

    So this nonsense about government not working to help reform health insurance? Its largely just that: nonsense.

    People like me need the very protections in this bill. My friend who is likely to deliver a baby with a heart condition in a month need these protections, so that her baby can't be denied covereage. The examples go on and on.

    And it makes me so incensed that parts of the Democratic party would rather object to this bill, and hope to derail it and gather support for an IDEAL public plan for our country. Sounds amazing in Eutopia right?

    But its just not happening right now. If anyone on that side were at all educated in history, current affairs, or had ever worked in politics themselves, they'd know how to recognize a losing battle when they saw it.

    It sucks. Yes. I would love a universal health care system. But it just isn't possible right now. It isnt. So lets just pass this bill that WILL implement some amazing, important reforms, and then use it as a base bill to build upon.

    Sorry to rant, but I've just HAD IT with the idiots in the party that I love so dearly.

    Last ETA- Ezra Klein (B.A. in Poli Sci from UCLA, was a political campaign staffer, and has a solid journalism work history) on the Washington Post pretty much echos all my sentiments regarding Firedoglake (and their list of the Dec. 09 bill- not the current one, just FYI):
    And that's the problem with Hamsher's list more broadly. The points about the bill's provisions are, in most cases, misleading. Sometimes, the facts are off. Other times, Hamsher obscures the affected population. But much more problematic is that Hamsher's list implies that the bill is failing relative to a world in which we don't kill the bill.

    But in that world, there's still no drug re-importation. Still 50 million uninsured. Still rampant cost growth. In the world where we pass the bill, most everything gets somewhat better, if not good enough. More people have insurance. The insurance industry ditches its worst practices. Fewer families go medically bankrupt. More people catch diseases early, when they can be cured, rather than late, when they become fatal. People who would otherwise have died live. The medical system begins the process of updating itself for the 21st Century, and responding to the cost pressures it's placing on the rest of the country.

    The world in which we kill the bill is a world in which everything just continues to get worse, and politicians are scared away from the issue for decades. A world in which we pass the bill is a world in which things get better, and politicians remember that they can pass big pieces of legislation that take on, or begin taking on, big problems.
    Ezra Klein - Jane Hamsher's 10 reasons to kill the bill
    Last edited by Cali; March 20th, 2010 at 01:38 AM.

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    Elite Member Cali's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by travelbug View Post
    Cali, what you posted is more of the way I expected things would go based on campaign promises and such. It's really hard to discern what's true and isn't true. Does anyone have a link to the most recent copy of the bill?
    I love that you asked for it. I'm so sick of all the editorializing in our media, that I pretty much tune it out and look on Thomas.gov for the actual text of the bill.

    Also, if you can't find it on Thomas, then if you go to the homepage for the committee (say, Budget Cmt in the House) they frequently have the text of bills posted.

    And if you can't really remember then Congress.org and CSPAN are great resources for finding them.

    That said, you can read and download all the relevant docs for the HC Reconciliation bill here:
    COMMITTEE ON RULES - H.R. 4872 - Reconciliation Act of 2010

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Wombat View Post
    Thanks for posting all this, Cali.
    No prob!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cali View Post
    Frankly, I wouldn't know beyond what you posted here. Because every single time I try to view something on Firedoglake, it crashes my web browser. And not just Firefox, but Safari and Internet Explorer as well. And consistently for the past month.

    The word 'amateurish' comes to mind.

    ETA-

    Also- funny you should say that. I wonder what Ms. Hamsher's educational background is in?

    Oh, that's right. She doesn't even seem to have A college degree. At best, she has one in something film-related from USC. Not denigrating such a degree in any regard, but to value the opinion of a film producer over the NY Times on an issue that deals with the incredibly complicated underpinnings of our government, economy and health care system? No.

    And on that note, a rant: I just have zero patience for the faction of my party (Democrat) that is essentially cut-off-the-nose-despite-the-face. This bill is a START. A fantastic start. for so many people including myself. I was uninsured until a few days ago when HIPAA protections allowed me to FINALLY get a health insurance plan. Without HIPAA, I'd have been up shitcreek without a paddle, seriously.

    So this nonsense about government not working to help reform health insurance? Its largely just that: nonsense.

    People like me need the very protections in this bill. My friend who is likely to deliver a baby with a heart condition in a month need these protections, so that her baby can't be denied covereage. The examples go on and on.

    And it makes me so incensed that parts of the Democratic party would rather object to this bill, and hope to derail it and gather support for an IDEAL public plan for our country. Sounds amazing in Eutopia right?

    But its just not happening right now. If anyone on that side were at all educated in history, current affairs, or had ever worked in politics themselves, they'd know how to recognize a losing battle when they saw it.

    It sucks. Yes. I would love a universal health care system. But it just isn't possible right now. It isnt. So lets just pass this bill that WILL implement some amazing, important reforms, and then use it as a base bill to build upon.

    Sorry to rant, but I've just HAD IT with the idiots in the party that I love so dearly.

    Last ETA- Ezra Klein (B.A. in Poli Sci from UCLA, was a political campaign staffer, and has a solid journalism work history) on the Washington Post pretty much echos all my sentiments regarding Firedoglake (and their list of the Dec. 09 bill- not the current one, just FYI):
    Ezra Klein - Jane Hamsher's 10 reasons to kill the bill
    I absolutely agree. I've been saying this for awhile: the bill isn't perfect but for the love of god and all that is holy people need to remember that it's unbelievable that there is even a bill on the table. I've said in other threads that conservatives and the medical establishment powers have spent more than 100 years trying to make sure this didn't happen. I, for one, am really happy to see that something is finally going to pass. It will be modified and changed over the years and hopefully, one day, America can proudly say it takes care of it's citizens and doesn't allow them to die simply because they're poor. This is a step in that direction.
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    In 2009, 1.5 million Americans declared bankruptcy
    -Of those, 62% were medically related
    Don't slap me, cause I'm not in the mood!

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    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
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    I think it's amusing that you bring up the question of Jane Hamsher's qualifications, and yet the author of the new york times article is some 23 year old kid still getting her degree.

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    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
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    Also fun, Stupak is getting his abortion bullshit voted on and it will probably pass, and thus be inserted back into this shitty bill.

    But hey.. nevermind that it's a direct attack on roe v. wade... it may not be perfect but it's "good", right.

    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has made a deal with Rep. Bart Stupak in order to secure his vote and that of other anti-choice Democrats for the health care bill, which is scheduled to be voted on this Sunday. According to a member of Congress who was briefed on the matter, Pelosi has agreed to let Stupak have a vote on his amendment, which instructs the Senate to substitute his language for the Senate language on abortion.

    FDL has obtained a copy of the concurrent resolution (PDF1, PDF2, PDF3, PDF4), which includes cosponsors Marion Berry, Sanford Bishop, Joseph Cao, Kathy Dahlkemper, Steve Driehaus, Marcy Kaptur, Dan Lipinski, Alan Mollohan, and Nick Rahall. A second source confirms that with the exception of Cao, these are the members of Congress who are still on the fence. Cao is still considered a firm “no” vote.

    The deal calls for Stupak to have a vote on his amendment either before or after the House votes to confirm the Senate bill on Sunday. Stupak is confident that he has the votes to pass the measure, and is happy to have the vote after the House passes the Senate bill. He believes that by using a “tie bar” approach, his amendment would be “tied” to the health care bill — which would require just 51 votes in the Senate.

    Pro-choice members of the House, however, are demanding that the vote on the Concurrent Resolution happen before the House confirms the Senate bill. If in fact it passes, they plan to vote against confirming the Senate bill. They want Rep. Diana Degette to release the names of the 41 cosigners to her letter who pledged to vote against any bill that restricts a woman’s right to choose, and they are angry that the White House has been whipping to push through the Stupak deal.

    “It is outrageous that a Democratic Speaker, a Democratic Majority Leader and a Democratic President should support rolling back women’s reproductive rights,” says one member of the group.

    Alan Grayson, who voted against the Stupak Amendment when it went before the House last October, now has 80 cosponsors for his public option amendment, but has not been granted a floor vote.

    “I wonder why we can have a vote to please the anti-choice clique, and we can’t have a vote on the public option,” he says.

    Dave Dayen has an analysis of what’s included in the amendment.

    Text of the Concurrent Resolution below the jump

    IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

    MR. STUPAK (for himself, MR. Berry, Mr. Bishop of Georgia, Mr. Cao, Ms. Dahlkemper, Mr. Driehaus, Ms. Kaptur, Mr. Lipinski, Mr. Mollohan, and Mr. Rahall) submitted the following concurrent resolution; which was referred to the committee on ________

    CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

    Correcting the enrollment of H.R. 3590

    Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring) That in the enrollment of the bill H.R. 3590, the Clerk of the House of Representatives shall make the following corrections:

    (1) In the section 1303 amended by section 10104(c) of the bill –

    (A) in the section heading, insert “RELATING TO COVERAGE OF ABORTION SERVICES” after “SPECIAL RULES”; AND

    (B) strike subsection (a) and all of subsection (b) that precedes paragraph (4) and insert the following:

    “(a) IN GENERAL — Nothing in this Act (or any amendment made by this Act) shall be construed to require any health plan to provide coverage of abortion services or allow the Secretary or any other person or entity implementing this Act (or amendment) to require coverage of such services.

    “(b) LIMITATION ON ABORTION FUNDING –

    “(1) IN GENERAL — None of the funds authorized or appropriated by this Act (or an amendment made by this Act), including credits under section 36B of the Internal Revenue Service Code of 1986, shall be expected for any abortion or to cover any part of the costs of any health plan that includes coverage of abortion, except in the case where a woman suffers from the physical disorder, physical injury, or physical illness that would, as certified by a physician, place the woman in danger of death unless an abortion is performed, including life-endangering physical condition caused by or arising from the pregnancy itself, or unless the pregnancy is the result of an act of rape or incest.

    “(2) OPTION TO PURCHASE SEPARATE COVERAGE OR PLAN _- Subject to paragraph (1), nothing in this subsection shall be construed as prohibiting any non-Federal entity (including an individual or a State orlocal government) from purchasing separate coverage for abortions for which funding is prohibited under this subsection, or a plan that inclues such abortions, so long as such coverage or plan is not purchased using the non-Federal funds required to receive a Federal payment, including a preminum payment required for the qualified health plan towards whith the credit described in paragraph (1) is applied or a State’s or locality’s contribution of Medicaid matching funds.

    “(3) OPTION TO OFFER COVERAGE OR PLAN — Subject to paragraph (1), nothing in this subsection shall restrict any non-Federal health insurance insurer offering a qualified health plan from offering separate coverage for abortions for which funding is prohibited under this subsection, or a plan that includes such abortions for which funding is prohibited under this subsection, or a plan that inclue3s such abortions, so long as any such insurer that offers a qualified health plan through any Exchange that includes coverage for abortions for which funding is prohibited under this subsection also offers a qualified health plan through the Exchange that is identical in every respect except it does not cover such abortions.”

    (2) In subsection (a) of the section 1334 added by section 10104(q) of the bill, strike paragraph (6) and redesignate paragraph (7) as paragraph (6).

    Stupak Abortion Language to Be Substituted for Senate Language in Deal to Secure Health Care Votes | Firedoglake
    Good ol pelosi. Can't do this for the public option, but hey.. can jam some anti-choice, women hating bullshit back in for you all to enjoy.
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

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