Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345
Results 61 to 74 of 74

Thread: Movie 'The Help' - Heroic or stereotyping?

  1. #61
    Elite Member ShimmeringGlow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,695

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by witchcurlgirl View Post
    I can see that. To me the book was very cliched and sort of cornpone. The women in my office were all reading it last year so I borrowed it from one of them. It wasn't badly written for a first novel, and it was entertaining enough, just a story I've read before.

    I usually am disappointed when I read very hyped books, or see hyped movies. I call it Lovely Bones syndrome. I read it and keep going WTF??? How did this sell a jillion copies? But what do I know? I hated Titanic and Forrest Gump, which were both runaway successes.
    I hated Forrest Gump and I've never watched Titanic. No desire.

    A friend recommended that I read "The Help." I couldn't get through the first couple of paragraphs. My grandfather used to tell us stories about what it was like before the Civil Rights Movement began and I just don't want to read sugarcoated stories about what is was like back then.

  2. #62
    Elite Member BITTER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    GUTTED
    Posts
    22,811

    Default

    The Color Purple was such an amazing book, but Steven Spielberg pretty much gutted it and removed a lot of the content that made the book so compelling so that he could make mainstream audiences feel more comfortable. Whoopi saved that movie.
    Good luck getting a cat to do anything let alone join in on your sexcapades. - Air Quotes

  3. #63
    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    42,527

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ShimmeringGlow View Post
    I hated Forrest Gump and I've never watched Titanic. No desire.

    A friend recommended that I read "The Help." I couldn't get through the first couple of paragraphs. My grandfather used to tell us stories about what it was like before the Civil Rights Movement began and I just don't want to read sugarcoated stories about what is was like back then.
    Then go back and read it. Nothing is sugar coated.
    I didn't start out to collect diamonds, but somehow they just kept piling up.-Mae West

  4. #64
    czb
    czb is online now
    Elite Member czb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    left coast
    Posts
    13,456

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by VenusInFauxFurs View Post
    I thought the movie sucked. I really was so bored during it.
    were you the woman sitting on the left of me wearing the prairie dress?

    ok, i never read the book but i thought this movie was overly long and overly corny. wouldn't say it sucked but didn't think it was that great. and yes, i have spent a LOT of time in the south so it's not that i don't understand life there. cicely tyson, sissy spacek, and some of the leads were really good but i did not like bryce dallas howard - i thought her performance was campy and some of her inflections were weird. and yes, i've met 'hillys' before so it's not that.

    FAIL

  5. #65
    A*O
    A*O is offline
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! A*O's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Being Paula
    Posts
    30,395

    Default

    In my experience it's ALWAYS better to rely on the original book to get an authentic understanding of the story and/or background than rely on the movie which is never a true reflection of what the author intended. I challenge anyone here to suggest a movie that did justice to the novel it's based upon. I can't think of one example. That's not to say the movie versions are inferior, but they can never capture the subtleties of the written original. And in some instances they are so completely different to the novel it's hard to recognise them as the same story.
    I've never liked lesbianism - it leaves a bad taste in my mouth
    Dame Edna Everage

    Just because you're offended doesn't mean you're right.

  6. #66
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    3,808

    Default

    I tried to read the book too and made it through a chapter or two. There were a few things that I didn't like about it and I figured if I wasn't going to give it a fair shot then I should just stop. Perhaps I'll give it another try.

    If a movie is made from a book, I always read the book before I see the movie, as reading the book is usually a more complete experience for me, somehow.

    I think sometimes movies do manage to do justice to the books they came from, or at least complement and fulfill the books. I guess Lord of the Rings is the best example for me.

  7. #67
    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    42,527

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by january View Post
    Viola Davis should get an Academy Award nomination. Saw it today and I loved it. They left out the poker scene with the attacker/Minny/Celia, which was a great part of the book. Otherwise I thought it was done well, stayed true to the book but cut out parts that were filler, like delving into her relationship with Stewart and Minny's relationship with Leroy. It was a great movie just on its own - I went with a group of girlfriends and everyone loved it. Perfectly cast, I was impressed with the actress who played Celia, can't remember her name now. I definitely recommend it!
    I missed that,too. That would have been awesome.
    Quote Originally Posted by Polyester Pam View Post
    Such a good book/movie. Just finished the book this week and thought Celia and Minny were really well cast.

    My ma walked out of the movie wondering where she can get Minny's fried chicken recipe. Anyone know if there's something special in it? Looked like shake 'n' bake to me.
    Far,far from shake'n'bake. This is what you need: an iron skillet, large & heavy. Season a few days. Coat w/Crisco an leave in a 250 degree oven for hours. Then melt Crisco, enough so it is halfway up the chicken. Start with the dark peices first, they take longer.
    Quote Originally Posted by A*O View Post
    In my experience it's ALWAYS better to rely on the original book to get an authentic understanding of the story and/or background than rely on the movie which is never a true reflection of what the author intended. I challenge anyone here to suggest a movie that did justice to the novel it's based upon. I can't think of one example. That's not to say the movie versions are inferior, but they can never capture the subtleties of the written original. And in some instances they are so completely different to the novel it's hard to recognise them as the same story.
    To Kill A Mockingbird?

    I wonder if some people who said they saw the movie really did.
    2 of our favorite things were in it, yet not mentioned here.
    Uses of Crisco.
    Herpes!!!
    I finally got to see it yesterday and I thought they did a really good job. The interesting part for me was hearing from my Cousins in Mississippi what local person played what part,etc. No scandal occured.
    Little Mae Mobley was perfect. I was surprised by the choice for Skeeter's Mama, but she was great. I also like the church preacher and the Jackson news editor. Cicely Tyson was heartbreaking. Attention to even the smallest roles was fantastic.
    Box office remained tops for Labor Day weekend and I can see why. Our audience had a lot of couples who laughed and just enjoyed it for the good movie it is, no 3D required.

    For those of you who could't get "in" the book, try the book on CD. Those voices were real, not fake Southerners. It added so much!

    As for the movie: It was kind. It was smart. It was important.
    Last edited by McJag; September 4th, 2011 at 08:23 AM.
    I didn't start out to collect diamonds, but somehow they just kept piling up.-Mae West

  8. #68
    Elite Member LynnieD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    34,698

    Default

    Ok, I still haven't read the entire book, but ran across this little article and thought I'd add it to the discussion:

    Full disclosure: I read half of The Help and it bugged me so I put it down. It just seemed hackneyed to me, with the maids all speaking in slang and the white women speaking in a perfectly normal way that didn’t even have a southern twang. Plus the plot bothered me. I’m white, which makes me feel unqualified to judge whether it was racist (which I suspected), but it started to drag in the middle and I put it down.

    So I haven’t finished the book, and I’ve never seen the movie, but I felt a little twinge of smugness when I read that the author, Kathryn Stockett, is getting sued. Apparently the lead character in The Help, Aibileen, shares an incredible amount of commonalities with a maid and nanny who worked for the author’s brother for over 12 years, Abilene Cooper. I’m going to include some details from this article in The Daily Mail about the lawsuit, because it lays out the details well. The Mail gets it wrong, though, by claiming the suit is ongoing. This lawsuit for just $75,000 in damages was dismissed in mid August for being filed after the “statute of limitations for misappropriation claims.” It sounds like Cooper had a decent claim against Stockett, though. Here’s more:




    When Abilene Cooper picked up her copy, however, her reaction was rather different. Instead of sympathy for the characters of The Help, there was anger and devastation.

    As she turned the pages she came to believe that the story at the heart of the book – an unlikely friendship between a white girl and a black maid – was her own. Her life, she believes, has been stolen, without acknowledgment or payment.
    Certainly the name is hers, although in the book the heroine is spelt Aibileen. The city, Jackson, Mississippi, is correct, and like the characters in The Help, she has spent much of her life working in white households.

    Intriguingly, these include the household of Kathryn Stockett’s brother and sister-in-law, where she has been a maid and nanny for 12 years.

    Abilene says: ‘When I started to read the book, I said, ‘‘This is the closest thing to my life I ever seen. It’s gotta be me.’’
    ‘Kathryn spelt my name wrong, but they pronounce it exactly the same way in the book and the film. I introduced myself to Kathryn when I first met her at her brother’s house that way: ‘‘Aib-e-leen”.

    Kathryn has Aibileen teaching the white folks’ baby girl to call her ‘‘Aib-ee”. That’s what I taught Kathryn’s niece and nephew to call me because they couldn’t manage Abilene.

    ‘I just cried and cried after I read the first few pages. In the book, Aibileen has taken her job five months after her son is killed in an accident. My son, Willie, had leukaemia and died when he was 18, in July 1998, three months before I went to work for the Stocketts.

    ‘I felt the emotions in my heart all over again. Kathryn copied parts of my life and used them without even asking me.’
    In the book, Aibileen is a deeply religious woman who sports a gold tooth and a gold cross, as does the real-life Abilene.
    Both women cope with the stifling heat of the Mississippi summer by wearing wigs when their own hair goes limp in the humid air.

    Both devote a lifetime to bringing up the babies of ‘white folks’: the fictional Aibileen has raised 17 children while Abilene estimates her total to be 18 or 19.

    The novel is set in the early Sixties and Aibileen hears that black civil rights leader Medgar Evers has been assassinated by the Ku Klux Klan in her home town, Jackson. The heroine is dizzy with fear and the passage has an eerie similarity to Abilene’s own memories of the murder.

    She, too, remembers how Evers’s death brought the city to the brink of civil war. When Abilene, then 12, heard the news from her grandmother that day in 1963, she was terrified: ‘My grandmomma September 4, 2011 From Sharon Churcher in Jackson, Mississippi told us all we had to protect us was God and prayer,’ she says. ‘There weren’t no coloured policemen.’
    The killing was one of the most significant moments in the long, hard battle for civil rights in the Deep South.

    A careworn, heavyset woman who has been working as a maid for white families in Jackson since she was 13, Abilene says: ‘My brothers were involved in the civil rights protests and my daddy feared for our lives and my momma walked around praying.

    The Help compares Aibileen’s skin colour to a cockroach: ‘He black,’ Abilene says of the insect, ‘blacker than me. How can Kathryn live with herself after writing that? How can a person be that cruel?

    ‘I think she is just a racist. She claims she respects black people but she just ran all over me.’

    [From The Daily Mail]

    Again, this lawsuit isn’t going anywhere. Stockett sent Cooper a note in 2009 telling her the character in the book wasn’t based on her despite the obvious name similarities. Cooper didn’t get around to reading the book until over a year later, and since the suit wasn’t filed until 2011, after the one year statute of limitations, it was thrown out. I follow celebrity news closely (well only the most superficial and trashy of it, but still) and I didn’t hear anything about this lawsuit when it was dismissed nearly a month ago.

    The Help continues to dominate the box office. It was number 1 over this holiday weekend for the third weekend in a row, bringing its domestic box office total to $118.6 million. E! Online asks if it’s the Avatar of chick flicks. (Here’s an article that discusses how it got made. Apparently Stockett was childhood friends with the guy who ended up directing it, actor/director Tate Taylor.)

    As for this lawsuit, I’m surprised that Stockett didn’t offer some kind of settlement. She may have based Aibileen on another maid she knew who passed away, (as she claims) but the biographical similarities to the real Abilene are striking. To me, it just goes to show what a derivative book it is, but I know a lot of people enjoyed it and obviously the movie as well.
    http://www.celebitchy.com/178592/hel...brothers_maid/

  9. #69
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    fellow traveller
    Posts
    51,883

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by A*O View Post
    I challenge anyone here to suggest a movie that did justice to the novel it's based upon. I can't think of one example. That's not to say the movie versions are inferior, but they can never capture the subtleties of the written original. And in some instances they are so completely different to the novel it's hard to recognise them as the same story.
    the godfather, charlotte's web, american psycho, a clockwork orange, trainspotting, fight club, one flew over the cuckoo's nest, to kill a mockingbird, the shining (movie is better than the book imo), thank you for smoking, brokeback mountain, the jason bourne movies, l.a. confidential, the secret of nimh, children of men, stand by me, no country for old men...
    I'm open to everything. When you start to criticise the times you live in, your time is over. - Karl Lagerfeld

  10. #70
    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    42,527

    Default

    [quote=LynnieD;2536335]Ok, I still haven't read the entire book, but ran across this little article and thought I'd add it to the discussion:

    Full disclosure: I read half of The Help and it bugged me so I put it down. It just seemed hackneyed to me, with the maids all speaking in slang and the white women speaking in a perfectly normal way that didn’t even have a southern twang. Plus the plot bothered me. I’m white, which makes me feel unqualified to judge whether it was racist (which I suspected), but it started to drag in the middle and I put it down.

    Get the book on CD. You will quickly see the difference. As far as the maids speaking in slang, that is very real. Very. As far as the white women speaking in a perfectly normal way- you can't hear them except in your non Southern head and trust, it ain't the same.
    How do you know that they were not speaking with Southern accents? They were. That is the only way they know to speak, even to this day. Like me and every person I am kin to. But I can write in general American!

    It is not racist, but a small triumph over racism using the only weapon they had-the written word.

    As far as the lawsuit, I find it strange. The name was so similar to begin with. It makes me uneasy.
    I know it has been thrown out, but only on a technicality.
    That woman was asking for $75,000. I wish she would just give her the money, because that does bother me very much. She now has millions and she should fix things with this woman if there is just a hint of hurting her feelings. It needs to be settled fairly and quietly.
    Last edited by McJag; September 5th, 2011 at 10:34 AM. Reason: fixed.
    I didn't start out to collect diamonds, but somehow they just kept piling up.-Mae West

  11. #71
    Elite Member LynnieD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    34,698

    Default

    The bolded part of that article are not my words McJag---it was the author's (of the article). I haven't read it all yet, but do like what I have read so far.

  12. #72
    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    42,527

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LynnieD View Post
    The bolded part of that article are not my words McJag---it was the author's.
    Well,thank goodness. Nevermind. I couldn't get the quote thing to work right anyway.
    I didn't start out to collect diamonds, but somehow they just kept piling up.-Mae West

  13. #73
    Elite Member BITTER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    GUTTED
    Posts
    22,811

    Default

    I went to see this today - meh, it had some affecting moments, but it was also false in some ways. The true horrors of those who risked their jobs and lives during the movement were really downplayed. It was almost like a Lifetime movie - I was waiting for Della Reese to come out.
    Good luck getting a cat to do anything let alone join in on your sexcapades. - Air Quotes

  14. #74
    Elite Member SuriCruise's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    3,295

    Default

    I really enjoyed this movie. It did feel a little corny at times, but take it for what it is. I can definitely see the Lifetime movie comments. I especially loved Celia and thought all of the performances were stunning. Emma Stone was very good but I think she was miscast in the role, something just didn't quite click for me, she was good but imo the weakest of a lot of great performances. She looks too modern imo. It was a great movie and everyone I've spoken to loved it.

    I also hate Titanic and could take or leave Forrest Gump.
    And so, I will keep fighting to make the US a more progressive, multi-cultural country, and my fight starts on GossipRocks - mikesandy

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 16
    Last Post: April 7th, 2010, 12:43 PM
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: June 21st, 2009, 10:13 PM
  3. Life-saving dog, cat honored for heroic acts
    By Honey in forum Pets and Animals
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 3rd, 2007, 03:09 AM
  4. The Black Donnellys -- more Irish thugs/Hollywood stereotyping
    By Dean James in forum Television and Movies
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: April 11th, 2007, 03:55 PM
  5. Mel Gibson criticized for stereotyping in Apocalypto
    By moomies in forum Gossip Archive
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: December 9th, 2006, 06:19 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •