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Thread: Dollhouse (season 2)

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    Elite Member Fluffy's Avatar
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    Default Dollhouse (season 2)

    Season 2 premiere tonight. Anyone?

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    Super Moderator NoDayButToday's Avatar
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    I'll be watching. I loved last season after episode 6, and I've heard this season is gonna be MUCH better than last season.

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    Elite Member Fluffy's Avatar
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    Here's a short interview with Whedon that I came across:
    Friday, September 25, 2009

    Welcome to the Dollhouse: My Interview with Joss Whedon

    Dollhouse is back tonight, and you can be sure that I'll be in front of my television, worrying about Echo, sort of rooting for Adelle and sort of being ashamed of it, and hoping the ratings get better because Fran Kranz really doesn't need something else he's part of to be cancelled or not make enough money and I'd sort of like for him to continue having a career. But 9pm is a long time from now, you guys. And so, to keep you busy until then, I have a special post. Last March, Joss Whedon was kind enough to take some time out of shooting The Cabin in the Woods to email me some very entertaining and thoughtful answers to questions I had about the show, for a piece I was working on for The Atlantic (keep in mind, only a few episodes had aired, and I was largely pursuing the human trafficking metaphor). I didn't get to use very much of his responses, but here they are, for your reading pleasure:


    Alyssa: Human trafficking has become, for lack of a better word, a fairly popular subject for movies and documentaries in the past several years—and combating trafficking was a major priority of the Bush administration. How much did you consider you consider the politics surrounding trafficking when you designed Paul Ballard’s character?

    Whedon: Trafficking is the lowest and most appalling crime perpetrated in any country not currently at war. So of course it makes popular fiction. Drugs are passé, murder is solved once a week on half the shows on TV… we always need to get more extreme. And here is a crime with classic foreign villains – with actual mustaches to twirl, desperate young female victims – the morality is genuinely simple and it’s a timeless American story: the captivity narrative. This is not to be callous, but the awful reality has a kind of fictional glamour to it. We can be outraged and moved but never feel it’s too close to home. The people at Equality Now have been fighting human trafficking and sex tours for years without any real support. In fact, when I pitched Dollhouse to the staff there, one of them objected to the character of Ballard, saying a helpful FBI agent would be an unforgivable myth. For more stories to be told – for altruistic or sensationalist reasons – is to increase awareness and can only, I think, be helpful.

    Alyssa: More broadly, can you talk about Dollhouse’s take on trafficking and prostitution? We know from the pilot that Caroline was in desperate when she signed up to become a Doll, but the episodes that have been aired so far show Echo enjoying her assignments. Is that ambiguity intentional, or will a clearer perspective emerge throughout the subsequent episodes?

    Whedon: Now, having said the above, let me be clear that Dollhouse was never meant to be about trafficking. It was meant to be about power, desire, identity, and sexuality. I knew from the start that prostitution was part of the package, but that is something I was interested in exploring in a removed, fantastical setting. I don’t believe there’s anything wrong with people paying for sex IN THEORY. And what I was interested in was the desires people would have if they could create a true sexual narrative for themselves, to give the act context. It wasn’t until later in the process that I woke up in the middle of the night and thought “this is trafficking”. My response to that was to try and show both sides – the reality of trafficking and the fantasy of the Dollhouse, to show their differences AND similarities. To come at it head on. The Dollhouse fantasy is a dark one, but the darkness is more about why people give up their lives and what people with control over them will do. It’s still a fantasy. To have Paul Ballard say “It’s the same as trafficking” and try to link it to actual criminals was deliberate – like so many others, I wanted to do some stories about actual trafficking. Partly as narrative inoculation: “We’re not them!” and partly for the same reasons as everyone else. We didn’t get as far into that as we’d hoped – there’s been a lot of adjusting.

    Alyssa: Obviously, you’re skating around a raft of major political and moral issues in Dollhouse, but thus far, the show’s very much a piece of genre fiction. Do you contemplate doing episodes that have a greater sense of realism? Can you see doing an episode the examines the realities of prostitution, for example, more literally like you do with the social work system and low-wage service work in Season 6 of Buffy?

    Whedon: Some. Not too much, because the moral gray areas in the show are already lacking in white, and the show would become depressing beyond repair if it was all about the seamy side of life. That’s what SVU is for. (I love SVU, by the way.)

    Alyssa: One recurring theme I’ve noticed in some of your work is that women who resist coercion, whether it’s sexual or otherwise, have to be prepared to respond with violence. They’re usually competent at fighting back, but your female characters seem to be at risk a lot of the time. Is that just a function of the characters and the situations they’re in? Or is reflection of violence against women in society? Or an argument about how women should protect themselves?

    Whedon:
    All of the above? I write primarily about women. I write primarily horror and adventure stories. At some point, the hero’s gotta be put down. But then there is an amazing amount of unbelievable shit happening to women all over the world every single day. A lot to cull from – and to fight against. I don’t write politically, but if any woman tells me she gained strength from or identified with a character of mine, I am going to be pretty screamingly chuffed.

    Alyssa: One of the things I enjoyed most about Buffy was the fact that the show is deeply grounded in a community we get to know very well—at the end of the show, Sunnydale’s destruction feels like a major loss. Will we see an expansion of the world that Dollhouse is set in, beyond the house itself? I know you’ve been asked how viewers are supposed to get attached to Echo when she’s a different person every episode, but what role does setting play in grounding the show?

    Whedon: The world will expand. Oh holy boy will the world expand. And then, unless our ratings tick up a bit, it will very suddenly contract.
    Alyssa Rosenberg: Welcome to the Dollhouse: My Interview with Joss Whedon

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    Elite Member PoisonGirl's Avatar
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    I liked it!
    “You never know what's around the corner. It could be everything. Or it could be nothing. You keep putting one foot in front of the other, and then one day you look back and you've climbed a mountain.” - Tom Hiddleston

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    Elite Member Aella's Avatar
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    I adore this show. The first season has its issues, in part due to network interference, but like NoDay said, it came together after episode six, and the epilogue episode was a piece of television perfection.

    This season seems like it'll be especially awesome, especially considering all the Whedonverse and Galactica actors that will appear.
    "Remember to always be yourself. Unless you suck." - Joss Whedon

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    Eyes Wide Shut explored some of the same themes as Dollhouse.

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    "Dollhouse" minicap 2.4: Belonging

    by bad machine

    Before the free yoga classes, group showers and long, peaceful days spent staring at river stones and Victor's butt, Sierra was Priya, a poor, yet happy Australian artist. While selling her paintings on the promenade of the sunny, hippie freak show known as Venice Beach, California, she met Nolan Kinnard, a rich guy with a crush and an offer. And it wasn't to buy her a corn dog and a tramp stamp.
    One year ago. To win Priya over, Kinnard commissions a large painting and throws a party/art show at his home in her honor. Priya is out of place among his douchey rich friends and can barely hide her eye-rolling as she walks away from an insipid woman suffering from faux patrician lockjaw.
    Echo sidles up to her in a cocktail dress slash sausage casing that has just enough "give" in all the right places. Thank you.
    Programmed to be Kinnard's wingwoman, Echo talks up Kinnard and his Nobel Prize-worthy awesomeness, all designed to nudge Priya closer to his bedroom. It's all very "just between us girls" and effortless, but Priya's not quite convinced. Meanwhile, Kinnard and an older man eye both women, discussing the cost effectiveness of dolls versus dating. Well, duh. A doll will never ask for anything from Cartier (unless that's what you want her to do) or take half your net worth after 10 years.
    Kinnard tells his friend he doesn't want a doll, he wants Priya. Yes kids, Kinnard's not only an art lover, he's a Dollhouse executive, and a key developer of their medical breakthroughs. He knows not only about dolls, he knows it's not for him.
    Victor shows up. Priya is instantly drawn to his bad Italian accent and winning smile. They flirt a little while discussing the painting she created for Kinnard. He notes her use of birds in her work.
    Are they a metaphor? An homage to nature? Perhaps she just likes seagulls. In a moment of spontaneity, she snaps his picture with the bedazzled Polaroid camera hanging around her neck. And here I thought that was just the world's ugliest necklace.
    Priya asks Victor if he'd like to go somewhere less pretentious. He's all for taking her out of there, but before they can get out the door, Kinnard stops them. He blocks Priya from leaving while Victor is whisked away for a treatment, and to brush up on his definition of "wingman."
    First, Kinnard tries plain, old begging. When that doesn't work, he goes with the popular but rarely effective, you-owe-me. When Priya tells him to shove it, he drops back and punts with you-want-me-too. Like my mother always said, "Money doesn't buy class."
    Priya: It's all in your head. Get off me!
    Kinnard: I'm not going to take "no" for an answer. I'll do anything.
    Priya: Stop it! [slaps him!] You disgust me! Nothing in this world could make me love you!
    Fast forward one year. She loves him. Gives him a kiss. Guess he changed his mind about wanting a doll. If Kinnard can't have the real Priya, he'll settle for Sierra imprinted with a Priya facsimile. We all make compromises, but seriously.
    At the Dollhouse, Echo and Sierra are enjoying a painting class. Sierra's painting more birds, but these are now the work of a one-armed 10-year-old. Victor happens by and compliments her art anyway, even that crazy black patch she's brushing over and over like an abused child in art therapy.
    Sensing something's wrong with that picture, Echo shows it to Topher. "Sierra hates the bad man … It's not like the others. He makes her sad over and over," she tells him.
    Instead of asking Sierra where the bad man touched her, Topher shows Boyd the painting and asks what he thinks. Neither of them passes Sierra's Rorschach test. Boyd suggests that Topher check Dr. Saunder's notes for insights into Sierra's mind. Great. A crazy person's assessment of a disturbed person. Good thinking.
    Victor takes all the black paint away so Sierra won't be sad anymore. Boyd watches with growing suspicion as Echo encourages and compliments Victor for "taking charge." He then spies her, gasp, reading a book. Boyd's mulling over what Echo could possibly be up to when Topher rushes in with the results of his snooping: Kinnard is a neuroleptic evil genius, whatever that is.
    Topher proceeds to spout off an excited stream of medical gibberish about blocked mezzo-sopranos, partial inhibited Olympic pathways and increased conduction of iambic pentameters. Or something. It's making Boyd's head hurt. "You lost me at 'brain,'" he said dryly. Yeah, well, he lost me at, "Hey, Boyd, guess what?"
    In layman's terms, Sierra was not the paranoid schizophrenic they thought she was when she came to the Dollhouse. Kinnard drugged her and made her that way. He owns the clinic they found her in, he's on the staff there, and has his own agenda. The big question is: Does Adelle know?
    She does now.
    Adelle calls Kinnard to her office for a spot of tea and to tell him a "raping scumbag" like him can't have any more dolls to play with. More sugar? He double dog dares her to call the cops and demands they imprint Sierra and hand her over forever, or she's out of a job. Oh yeah? She'll just see about that.
    Adelle tells her boss, Harding, she's not about to send Sierra to live with a rapey scum sucker who thinks he's above the law and too lame to get a woman on his own. Harding reminds Adelle that she, too, has taken a little something "home from the office" when her alias, Miss Lonely Hearts, booked Victor for a weekend getaway. Oops. Awkward. How do you take that out of a paycheck?
    Harding ominously warns Adelle about the Dollhouse's early retirement plan (sounds permanent) and orders her to fill Kinnard's request.
    Downstairs, Sierra finds Victor pouring the bad man paint down the shower drain. They share a sweet moment painting each other's faces and giggling, until Sierra calls Victor an Indian Chief, the paint running down her face as she laughs. Suddenly, Victor collapses, struck by the memory of a soldier with blood running down his face, screaming, "Sergeant! What do we do?!" Victor mumbles, "I don't want to be in charge." It's all fun and games until someone has a flashback.
    At large and not really in charge, Adelle tells Topher they have to send Sierra back to Rapeytown.
    Topher: Aren't we supposed to care for these people? Dr. Saunders would never have allowed —
    Adelle: Which Dr. Saunders would that be? The avuncular physician so brutally cut down not five feet from where you're standing? Or the last woman to whom you gave a permanent imprint – the other wounded flower you restored by offering her a new life, who apparently found you so unbearable, she had to flee the city? Is it that one?
    Yeah, that one. Oh, Adelle.
    Topher was chosen for the Dollhouse because he has no morals. This makes it tough now, because he's starting to grow a teeny, tiny conscious. What an ill-timed pain in the ass. He somberly takes Sierra for her last treatment. Victor wants to come with her but he's barred from the treatment room. He sits down for what's going to be the longest wait for a girlfriend at the doctor's office, ever.
    In a flashback, we find Topher meeting Priya for the first time. On Kinnard's "suggestion," Topher picks her up at the loony bin, where she's an unkempt nut, ranting about being held prisoner and poisoned.
    Topher asks Priya if she even knows where she is. "Hell," she says. Close, she's in Los Angeles. You can tell the difference by the number of fires and liars. LA has more.
    Back in the present, Topher has imprinted Sierra and sent her back to her rapist. She arrives at Kinnard's place brimming with the kind of lovey-dovey happiness only Topher's chair or a tab of ecstasy can provide. She straddles Kinnard and suggests a naughty appetizer before dinner.
    Priya: [cooing] Did you want me wide-eyed, demure? Or stupid? Did you want me to be a mute? [coldly] Which is it, Nolan? Which fantasy did you want to keep forever?
    Kinnard: Priya?
    Priya: You just couldn't take "no" for an answer.
    Look out. Mama's home.
    Remember Echo? While we've been following Sierra, Echo learned how to read. She plays the zombie card when Boyd asks her about her secret book, saying she likes to try sounding out words for fun. She's also learned how to lie. The kids grow up so fast, don't they? One minute they're blithely going out dressed as dominatrix and coming home to a nice bowl of ice cream, the next, they're reading Suze Orman and demanding profit-sharing and a 401k plan.
    Boyd warns Echo she's going to get in trouble if she doesn't stop egging on the other actives, questioning management and stirring up trouble.
    Back at Chez Dahmer, Kinnard's head explodes when he hears Priya say she's in love with another man. The realization forming in her head as she's saying it, she tells Numbnuts there's a wonderful guy out there, she doesn't know how or why, but she loves him. Kinnard goes ballistic and they get into an all-out brawl. Domestic violence is never right. Except when it ends with multiple stabs wounds in a rapist's chest.
    Well, that's just great — she's gone a killed the VP of Neuroleptic Whatchamacallits.
    Topher and Boyd show up as the "cleaners." Having had some experience in this area, Boyd orders Topher to cut up the body with a saw, and marinate the pieces on sulfuric acid. Here's a helpful hint for all you at-home body disposers: Slit the femoral artery and drain the body. It makes cutting up a body a breeze!
    Who wants a leg?
    While Topher dry heaves his way through the hack job, Boyd is busy making fake travel reservations and Priya packs a suitcase full of Kinnard's clothes. After the body's been reduced to a frothy, soupy mess and all the clues are in place, Boyd calls Adelle to tell her Kinnard seems to have left town, leaving Priya behind. Of course, she doesn't believe any of it but she lets Boyd's story go down as easily as that bottle of scotch she polish off an hour ago.
    Safely back in the Dollhouse, Priya wants to forget ever being used, abused and confused. And killing a man isn't something she's proud of either, however heinous he was.
    Priya: I woke up from a nightmare only to live in one. You were supposed to help me.
    Topher: I thought I was. I was … fooled. I'm so sorry. If there was anything I could do to make it better.
    Priya: Do you have any beer?
    Mindwipes: It's Australian for "beer."
    Priya sees Victor, still sitting on the floor, waiting for her. She asks Topher, "I love him. Is that real?"
    He assures her that her love is real. Before going back into the chair, she asks Topher to erase this day from the books. I've had some of those.
    Sierra awakens, fresh and new. She finds Victor, right where she left him. They hold hands and skip away to see if there's any more tapioca in the cafeteria.
    Meanwhile, Echo is reading in secret when she finds someone has slipped an all-access keycard for the building into her book.
    Finally — a way into Adelle's private bathroom. Screw you, group showers.
    "Dollhouse" minicap 2.4: Belonging | AfterEllen.com

  8. #8
    Elite Member gas_chick's Avatar
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    I think the season has been really good thusfar but again it is being hit with the cancellation rumors.

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    This has been a busy week for cancellations. The latest addition to the TV graveyard: Dollhouse.

    According to multiple insiders, Fox has informed Joss Whedon that it will not be ordering additional installments of his low-rated drama beyond the current 13-episode order. On the bright side, the network still plans to burn off the remaining unaired episodes beginning in December. Hey, it’s something.

    Dollhouse has been averaging a mere 3 million viewers this season. Last season — when fan support, together with significant budget cuts, helped it to get an odds-defying second-year pickup — the show averaged 4.7 million.

    Bottom line: Dollhouse is lucky it ever saw a second season. Remember that when you’re posting your eulogies below.

    I love Joss Whedon but I'm surprised this show even got a second season.

    source

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    Elite Member Moongirl's Avatar
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    The End Is Nigh: Fox Officially Cancels Dollhouse - E! Online

    The End Is Nigh: Fox Officially Cancels Dollhouse
    Wed., Nov. 11, 2009 3:18 PM PST


    Frank Ockenfels/FOX

    UPDATE: Joss Whedon has spoken. "I feel [Dollhouse] is getting better pretty much every week," he just wrote to his fans on Whedonesque.com. "And I think you'll agree in the coming months. I'm grateful that we got to put it on, and then come back and put it on again." Joss also promised, "By the time the last episode airs, you'll know what my next project is."
    ________

    Dollhouse is done. We knew this was coming—Dollhouse creator Joss Whedon recently posted on fansite Whedonesque.com that the writers were "not exactly saving all the good stuff for 14-22," but still. 'Tis sad.

    Insiders confirm to us that Fox has officially closed the book on the Friday-night sci-fi series. (Series producer and Joss Whedon sister-in-law Maurissa Tancharoen, who also guest stars in an upcoming episode as an active named Kilo, tweeted confirmation as well, saying, "Yes. Cancelled. Sad but true.")

    We're hearing that episode 13 serves as a season finale "in a significant way and gives Joss enough time to wrap up the stories."

    The show is currently on hiatus for November sweeps (seeing as how its negligible ratings would more than likely drag down Fox's average), but is set to return beginning Dec. 4 with double-booked Fridays.

    So is there any chance the series could go to another network?

    Apparently not Syfy. The cabler preemptively warded off any fans hoping for a Syfy rescue attempt with this tweet, "Looks like Fox finally canceled Dollhouse. (No, I don't think we'll pick it up.)"

    Episodes five though 10 will air in two-episode blocks on Dec. 4, Dec. 11 and Dec. 18, and episodes 11 through 13 will air on Fridays beginning Jan. 8, meaning that the series finale will land on Jan. 22.

    Guest stars set to appear in the remaining installments include Buffy/Angel alum Alexis Denisof and Firefly alums Summer Glau and Alan Tudyk.

    We'll miss Enver Gjokaj, Dichen Lachman, Fran Kranz, Tahmoh Penikett and Olivia Williams most of all.

    Goodnight, crazy show that had the usual Whedony/Minearean glimmers of genius. Sleep well.

    Do you consider the demise of Dollhouse to be a tragedy or just part of the TV circle of life? And what do you believe to be the series' fatal flaw? Tell us in the comments.

    (Originally published Nov. 11, 2009, at 1:37 p.m. PT)

    _______

    Have a burning question about your favorite TV series? Email tvdiva@eonline.com for answers! Plus, follow Kristin Dos Santos on Twitter @kristinalert.

    by Kristin Dos Santos

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


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    © 2008 E! Entertainment Television, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. #11
    Elite Member gas_chick's Avatar
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    I think this just sucks. Fox is about to be on my no watch list just like ABC. They won't give a show a chance.

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    Elite Member caramel's Avatar
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    I only watched two firts episodes of Dollhouse last season and I didn't get it. I think Eliza Dushku is not good in it, she doesn't have enough charisma. She was good as a second slayer when she didn't need to carry the whole show.
    we don't have to make love to have an orgasm

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    Why is Whedon so obsessed with getting his shows on a network?

    David Chase woke up (this morning) and took The Sopranos to HBO, after the networks rejected it.

    Whedon belongs on cable, at least the Sci-Fi channel.
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    I think the show could have made it if Eliza Dushku was any kind of actress. At all.

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    I want to like this show but I just can't get into it. I agree with those that said Eliza Dushku isn't doing a very good job.
    Lisa

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