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Thread: Spain's racist basketball team

  1. #16
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    Spanish basketball team poses for offensive picture - Fourth-Place Medal - Olympics - Yahoo! Sports

    Spain's Olympic basketball team posed for an advertisement prior to the Games which appears to show all its players slanting their eyes, a move that could offend its Olympic hosts in Beijing. The ads, for a Spanish courier company, appeared in the Spanish-language newspaper La Marca.
    As the uproar over the picture has grown today, more information about the advertising shot has come to light. The New York Times reports that Spain's basketball team is sponsored by Li-Ning Footwear, a Chinese company founded by Li Ning, the final torchbearer who was hoisted along the top of Beijing National Stadium during the Olympic Opening Ceremony finale. The ad reportedly references the Spanish team recently extending their contract with the footwear giant for another four years.
    The Spanish-language paper El Mundo has a piece debating whether the ad was racist that basically calls out the British press for trying to smear Spain's good name. But they miss the point. Whether the picture was made in good fun is irrelevant. It was a ridiculous idea that was bound to upset a lot of people.
    It's baffling that nobody involved in the picture -- from the photographers to the players -- even seemed to consider that this ad would be looked at negatively. Did it not occur to somebody that it might not be a good idea to mock an entire continent before the world's largest athletic competition that, by the way, happens to take place on that continent. Were they not aware of an invention called "the Internet" that allows pictures taken in Spain to be transmitted all over the world for the eyes of everyone?
    And now that the inevitable controversy has hit, they're still defending themselves when a simple, "the ad was in poor taste, we apologize" would have sufficed. This story would be slowing down if the Spanish Basketball team had apologized immediately. Now it's just picking up steam.
    The Organization of Chinese-Americans has released multiple statements condemning the picture. George Wu, deputy director of the group, said, "it is unfortunate that this type of imagery would rear its head during something that is supposed to be a time of world unity." Response in Beijing has been muted so far.
    Madrid is thought to be one of the frontrunners to land the 2016 Summer Games (the site will be announced next year). Could this controversy hurt Spain's chances of landing another Olympics?
    Interestingly, the Spanish basketball team took on China tonight, winning 85-75 in overtime. No word on whether Pau Gasol was on the receiving end of any elbows from Yao Ming.

    The Chinese crowd did have a message for the Spainards though, booing vigorously during the game. (F**K YEAH!)

  2. #17
    Elite Member celeb_2006's Avatar
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    While this is referring to another sport, it's quite telling of Europe's not so dirty secret:

    Q & A: Fighting Racism in European Soccer - Goal - Soccer - New York Times Blog

    Q & A: Fighting Racism in European Soccer

    By Jeffrey Marcus
    Tags: racism, UEFA
    When U.S. international DaMarcus Beasley and his Rangers teammate Jean-Claude Darcheville were reportedly the victims of racist abuse during a Champions League qualifier against FK Zeta in Montenegro, UEFA said it would investigate. It would not the first time such ugly behavior at a soccer match has marred the game.
    William Gaillard said Uefa has been “a lot more proactive in recent seasons,” in fighting racism in soccer. (UEFA)
    In June, UEFA, European soccer’s governing body, reaffirmed its “zero tolerance” policy in regards to racism and intolerant behavior. But the incident in Montenegro reminds us that the problem is persistent.
    William Gaillard, the UEFA communications and public affairs director, talked to The New York Times this morning about the problem of racism in soccer and UEFA’s efforts to combat it. Here are excerpts of that conversation:
    NYT: How big is the problem of racism in European football?
    Mr. Gaillard: It’s about as large as the problem of racism in Europe. Football mirrors society in quite a variety of ways. Of course, minority extremists may use football for their own propaganda purposes, and we’ve seen in some countries, in particular in the South and East of Europe, very marginal neo-Nazi or neo-fascist groups using football and football supporters as a means of conveying their messages in an organized fashion.
    We have to distinguish between two types of behavior: One is organized and that has a purpose which is to campaign for a [group’s] extremist ideas by infiltrating supporters groups and sometimes getting hold of them by discouraging normal people from getting involved, even physically….
    The second type is societal… places that are behind in awareness of the problem. That’s what we get in the Balkans and other parts of Eastern Europe. One person starts booing a black player and stupidly the whole stands start doing the same thing.
    These are societies that are still traumatized by other events, like the war in the Balkans, and not aware of how other areas of Europe behave in the 21st century… We’re trying to fight both phenomena, but they both require different measures.

    NYT: How do you address the types of problems differently in different parts of the continent?
    Mr. Gaillard: Unfortunately we don’t have an arsenal of measures that can be tailored to the different problems we face. In Eastern Europe, mass education should be the way to handle one part of the problem and it should start in schools and so on. But we are in football and we don’t have the power to influence what’s being done in schools in those countries.
    The organized extremists must be dealt with by the clubs. They know these people, they know they organize, and sometimes give them free tickets to access the grounds. We handles this by fining them and sometimes expelling them from competitions. We are taking a harder line with this. If they don’t deal with these groups, then they are going to have to pay the consequences.
    NYT: But it seems to be more of a problem in Europe than South America, North America, certainly Africa. Why?
    Mr. Gaillard: Well, Africa isn’t diverse. It’s a different issue. I know Brazil quite well. There is very much racial stratification in society. In stadiums it doesn’t express itself. It’s so deep rooted, so it’s not questioned. If you’re part of the elite you’re white, and if you’re not, you’re not white.
    In Europe this has disappeared. In France we’ve had black national team players since the 1920s, way before Jackie Robinson in America….
    We are dealing, when we deal with Spain or Italy or England ten years ago — it’s changed a lot — we’re dealing with extremist groups. It wouldn’t be the case in American soccer because it’s not popular enough. But in Italy if you show a Nazi banner at a soccer stadium, it will be seen by tens of millions of people on television.
    FK Zeta supporters are known as “vukovi,” meaning wolves. Uefa is investigating accusations the fans in Montenegro made racist chants during a game with Rangers this week. (Risto Bozovic/Associated Press)
    NYT: Is the problem mainly with players, teams, fans?
    Mr. Gaillard: When you talk to players, and in particular minority players, they will give you very different answers. Some will say, ‘yes, there are still some problems, or when we play an Eastern European team, there are problems.’ In most places like France, Germany, England and Scotland, people would say today this would largely be solved. But no doubt in Eastern Europe you still get insults. We have sanctioned this very recently … I think this is increasingly extremely rare in England, France or Germany.
    NYT: Would you say complaints are on the rise or declining?
    Mr. Gaillard: We’ve been a lot more proactive in recent seasons. If you are more proactive, you’re bound to probably have more opportunities to intervene. We’ve been more busier than we were 10 to 15 years ago because maybe 10 to 15 years ago some behavior was considered normal or not worth dealing with.
    We are dealing with more cases. But I would say in a number of countries the battle has been — should I say won — or at least no longer a big issue. In England, France and Germany it is nothing that can be compared to what the situation is today in other Eastern European countries… and the clubs have dealt with extremists in a much more efficient way.
    NYT: In Eastern Europe, will it get worse before it gets better?
    Mr. Gaillard: You could have this situation in Eastern Europe, but it is difficult to predict.
    NYT: Will minority players not want to go play for clubs in Eastern Europe, or will clubs stop recruiting black players?
    Mr. Gaillard: No, I don’t think that’s the case. The market is stronger that people thinking, ‘am I going to get problems.’ It was true in Italy a few years ago that teams with far-right-wing supporters would get in trouble with their supporters, but I think in recent years this has been overcome.
    NYT: What has been the most effective way to combat racism in the sport?
    Mr. Gaillard: In terms of racism and violence, taking measures against clubs that are not dealing with the extremist supporters, even kicking them out of competitions, has been very effective. Unfortunately we have had to resort to such measures.
    Also, outrage in the general public has made a difference. Just because it has given a bad name to some clubs, and some of the leaders of these clubs have begun to think this is really bad… In the end, something has to be done to fight it because the club would be damaged in an almost permanent





    USATODAY.com - European soccer to investigate racism


    European soccer to investigate racism
    NYON, Switzerland (AP) — European soccer authorities opened an investigation into racist abuse by Spanish fans at this week's Champions League game.
    UEFA said Thursday that at the game between Real Madrid and Bayer Leverkusen fans "were seen making Nazi salutes while racist chanting was heard, directed at Leverkusen's black players." UEFA added that the actions were not in the official postgame reports.
    The governing body will consider television evidence and unspecified "other information" before ruling. UEFA already is investigating another case of racist chanting at the Spanish stadium after England's black players were targeted at an exhibition game with Spain last week.
    England coach Sven-Goran Eriksson said European and international soccer authorities now have a chance to do something about the problem. Some Spanish fans made monkey gestures whenever Ashley Cole, Shaun Wright-Phillips and Jermaine Defoe touched the ball in England's 1-0 loss in Madrid.
    "Now UEFA and FIFA have a golden opportunity to take care of it and do something very strong against it," Eriksson said. "It's never good that things like that happen but it was a good example and I think something will happen now."
    Soccer's governing bodies already have the power to order teams to play games in empty stadiums or can even expel them from competitions if the fans are guilty of violent behavior. They can do the same for racism.

  3. #18
    Elite Member RevellingInSane's Avatar
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    I am not surprised by any of this. Ignorance is alive and well all over the world.

    I can't wait to see these racists imbeciles get their bigoted asses stomped on the court.



  4. #19
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    (once again classic example of fake "apology/regret" and acting dumb as if the rest of the world doesn't "get it." Do these players actually think the rest of the world is THAT stupid? Shame on Gasoll he should know better, hopefully this will bite him when he goes back to L.A. to play for the Lakers as Southern California has a big population of asians/Chinese)

    Gasol, Calderon question fuss over photo - Olympics - Yahoo! Sports

    Gasol, Calderon question fuss over photo

    By Martin Rogers, Yahoo! Sports 2 hours, 23 minutes ago
    Return to Original

    The Los Angeles Lakers center had just finished training Wednesday at the Beijing Language and Culture University, where students from around the world gather to learn Mandarin and promote international understanding.
    Four days into the most global of events, and surrounded by buildings which foster social harmony across all colors and creeds, Gasol had to apologize for the actions of a Spanish men’s basketball team that made Asian “slant eyes” at the camera for a sponsor’s advertisement and thinks it’s OK.
    Around him, his teammates and coaches reacted to the criticism homing in on them from around the world with a mixture of embarrassment, confusion and some mild defiance. The ad in question was for a Spanish courier company, Seur, but the Spanish team also counts the athletic shoe and apparel company owned by Li Ning – the former Chinese Olympian who lit the torch at this summer’s Games – among its sponsors.


    Jose Calderon of the Toronto Raptors has spent the last three years in North America, but he didn’t get it. He could still not understand how an action with such deep racial undertones had generated so much attention. In his mind a non-story became a story only when it was blown out of proportion by journalists with a mind for mischief.

    “We did it because we thought it was going to be something nice, something with no problem,” Calderon told Yahoo! Sports. “But somebody wants to talk about it. It is too much of a big deal with you guys (the media) and everybody talking about that.” (WTF)

    Head coach Aíto García Reneses didn’t get it, either. Reneses comes from an older generation of Spanish society, one which has little time for the politically correct niceties of the modern world.
    “If I go to play with a taller team and I put here (raising up on the tips of his toes) it is not an offense,” Reneses said. “I can’t understand anything more.”
    But Gasol got it. He didn’t get it when the Spanish courier company persuaded the players to pose with their index fingers stretching their eyes to a thin slit at a team media day, but he sure as heck gets it now.
    “Some of us didn’t feel comfortable doing it just because to me it was a little clownish for our part to be doing that,” Gasol said. “But the sponsors insisted and insisted. I think it is just a bad idea I guess to do that, but it was never intended to be offensive or racist against anybody.

    “I didn’t find it very funny. I didn’t find it offensive, either. I guess some guys didn’t mind. To me I don’t want to be that way, I guess, to be doing that stuff.

    “If anybody feels offended by it we totally apologize for it. We never meant anything offensive by it.”
    The advertisement has regularly run as a full page in Spanish sports daily Marca soon after the picture was taken on July 1. However, it only came to prominence after it reached the attention of the Guardian newspaper in London this week.
    Spanish sports is no stranger to racial controversy.

    Luis Aragones, the head coach of Spain’s men’s soccer team, was overheard telling his player Jose Antonio Reyes to “tell that black (expletive) you are better than him” at a training session in 2004. Aragones was referring to Thierry Henry, a black player from France who was then a teammate of Reyes at English Premier League club Arsenal.
    Aragones also struggled to understand what all the fuss was about, even as anti-racism groups seethed and soccer’s power brokers held their heads.
    At a Formula One motor racing testing session this year, a group of Spanish fans believed to be supporting home driver Fernando Alonso were pictured with their faces covered with black paint. They wore T-shirts with the slogan “Hamilton’s Family,” a reference to Alonso’s world title rival Lewis Hamilton, a black Englishman.
    Moreover, at an exhibition match in Madrid in 2004, several black members of the England men’s soccer team were subjected to monkey chants and whistles whenever they touched the ball.

    Back in Spain, there has been no criticism of the advertisement, just support for a group of players who shoulders the hopes of a nation. Members of the Spanish media who spoke to Yahoo! Sports on Wednesday could not grasp why the issue had garnered so much publicity.

    And while Gasol, in many ways the public face of Spain’s basketball team, sensed the photo was not a great idea, he refused to back down from his assertion that no harm was intended.
    “If you put it in the wrong context and put it with the wrong people or a different kind of people, you could take it that way,” he said. “But not with our group and not with our people. I would find that a wrong read.” (well maybe "you people" need to get with the f**king 21st century, idiotos)

  5. #20
    Elite Member Laurent's Avatar
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    Spanish Olympians Apologize for Controversial Ad
    By Brian Orloff

    Members of the Spanish men's and women's basketball teams are apologizing for a newspaper advertisement in which they make Asian-caricature faces for the camera.

    International outrage erupted over the ad for Seur, a Spanish courier company, that showed the athletes pulling their skin to make their eyes narrow. The ad appeared in Spanish publications.

    "If anyone feels offended by it, we totally apologize for it," Pau Gasol, a Spanish star who also plays for the Los Angeles Lakers, told the New York Times after practice Wednesday at the Beijing University of Language and Culture.

    Other team members maintain the ad was taken out of context and say they took part only after Seur's representatives pressured them. And the team's coach, Aito García Reneses, declined to apologize for the photograph. He said he did not see it – and says it was meant as a joke.

    "All of the Spanish people are close to the Chinese people mentally," he said. "We have a very good relationship."

    Gasol said his team posed for several hundred pictures for various sponsors.

    "Some of us didn't feel comfortable doing it," Gasol told reporters. "To me it was little clownish for our part to be doing that. The sponsor insisted and insisted. They pushed because they're the people that pay the money. It was just a bad idea to do that. It was never intended to be offensive or racist against anybody."

    Emmanuelle Moreau, a spokeswoman for the International Olympic Committee, said the apology was accepted. She wrote in an e-mail message: "We understand that the Spanish team intended no offense and has apologized. The matter rests there as far as the I.O.C. is concerned."
    Spanish Olympians Apologize for Controversial Ad - Olympics Summer 2008 : People.com
    “What are you looking at, sugar-tits?” - Mel Gibson

  6. #21
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    Yawn. The usual code words, "if anyone was offended by it." STFU gasol you tool, duh, why else is this big news? Didn't feel comfortable doing it? Ya right, after the fact.

    "Apologies" as hollow as the team itself.

  7. #22
    Elite Member Beeyotch's Avatar
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    Told you they don't see the "big deal" about it. They have no clue.

  8. #23
    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurent View Post
    Anyone else remember that episode of America's Next Top Model when they went to Spain and the male Spanish model refused to kiss Jaeda because she is black?
    Yes! I remember that one. He was fug anyway though IMO. fucker.
    Don't slap me, cause I'm not in the mood!

  9. #24
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    Ughhh! I'm thoroughly disgusted. Seeing that pic with the players doing that pulled back eyes routine brought back memories for me...all racial taunts by stupid assholes.
    Rock the fuck on!

  10. #25
    Elite Member moomies's Avatar
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    I don't think stuff like this is about ignorance..it's more about hatred and racial superiority.

    Ignorance to me is like you don't know any better or you're misinformed because you refused to learn or accept knowledge.

    If you think it's crazy, you ain't seen a thing. Just wait until we're goin down in flames.

  11. #26
    Hit By Ban Bus! AliceInWonderland's Avatar
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    ur right mooms; they're just being stupid assholes!!!!

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    Spain cheered in 72-59 win vs. Germany
    Spain cheered in 72-59 win vs. Germany - Olympics - Yahoo! Sports

    BEIJING (AP)—Spain and Pau Gasol had said too much was being made about a controversial photo the team did for an ad campaign and Thursday they played like it in a convincing 72-59 victory against Germany.
    Gasol, the Los Angeles Lakers center, scored 13 points for Spain, which was cheered by the crowd at the basketball arena.
    There was no indication Spain had been affected by criticisms of an ad running in Spanish newspapers showing all 15 members of the team using their fingers to apparently make their eyes look more Chinese.
    Spain’s coach Aito Garcia said he had had nothing to do with the ad and had not even seen the photo. But he grew testy when pressed by a reporter on whether the controversy had posed a distraction to his players.
    “I can’t understand this. Who’s discussing this? You’re discussing this,” Garcia said at a post-game press conference.


    International Olympic Committee spokeswoman Giselle Davies Thursday once again called the photo “inappropriate,” but added, “We understand the team has apologized and meant no offense. The matter rests there for the IOC.”
    Beijing Olympic committee spokesman Wang Wei said Thursday he hadn’t seen the photo and couldn’t comment on it. The OCA, an organization representing Asian-Pacific Americans, found the photo disturbing.
    The leader of Madrid’s bid for the 2016 Games said it was an “isolated incident” and a “misunderstanding” that should not affect Spain’s Olympic candidacy.
    “We are not worried about that,” Mercedes Coghen told The Associated Press. “I think they meant it as a friendly thing. They are really nice guys. As you know they have (Chinese sportswear brand) Li Ning as sponsors.
    “I don’t give more importance to it. We are talking in our bid about inclusiveness. We are talking about how we want to use the sports values to change, to create a new model of living together. In Madrid we live with 190 nationalities together.”

    The controversy hasn’t been reported in China’s entirely state-owned media and Chinese fans at the 18,000-seat Beijing Olympic Basketball Gymnasium cheered for both teams during the game with no sign of anti-Spanish sentiment.
    Huang Shiren, a fan at the Spain-Germany game, said at halftime he hadn’t heard about the picture. When shown the photo he didn’t recognize the gesture.
    “Are they looking at something?” Huang asked.


    Chinese, more than 90 percent of whom are members of the majority Han ethnic group, tend to be highly sensitive to political slights against their nation, but less attuned to racial and ethnic slurs seen in the west. Huang, a Han who works for the city government, said all seemed well in relations between the two countries.
    “Spain and China don’t have any problems between them,” Huang said. “This should just be about sports without any of that other noise.”
    Span guard Jose Manuel Calderon suggested the issue had been blown out of proportion.
    “I think we’re talking about things that don’t matter,” the Toronto Raptors guard said after the game. “We feel bad, but there is too much talk about it. We are a very multicultural country in Spain. We are for sure going to apologize.”
    Calderon led Spain with 15 points and Alex Mumbru added 14.
    Spain double- and even triple-teamed Dirk Nowitzki of the Dallas Mavericks. German coach Dirk Bauermann said he felt “a few more fouls should have been called.” Nowitzki finished with 11 points. Germany plays China Saturday and Spain faces the United States.

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    Elite Member KristiB's Avatar
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    Spain: Spanish Tennis Team Also Strikes "Chinky-Eyed Chinaman" Pose!

    Looks like Spains Tennis Team has a picture too




    You would have thought, perhaps, that the embarrassing ad photo of the Spanish Olympic basketball team in the eyelids-pulled-back, "Slanty-eyed Chinese" pose was just a one-off thing. I mean, if they had done this before, they would have had a better apology ready, right? But maybe Asia-mocking is actually a favorite pastime of all Spanish athletes—because their 2008 Federation Cup Tennis team, which beat China to move into the finals, was photographed in the same god damn pose

  14. #29
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    assholes.

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    I don't see Rafael Nadal in the tennis team pic. As far as I'm concerned, he's the only tennis player Spain has that's worth noticing. Maybe someone in that country has a lick of good sense. One can only hope.

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