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Thread: NBA Playoffs (2010)

  1. #31
    Elite Member MontanaMama's Avatar
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    Dayum the Cavs can make opposing pg's look amazing...Rondo was unbelievable. Still 10 wins to go.
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  2. #32
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    That Rondo was amazing, one of the greatest performances in playoff history!

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by celeb_2006 View Post
    That Rondo was amazing, one of the greatest performances in playoff history!
    agreed
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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by msdeb View Post
    agreed
    [YOUTUBE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zg0wwXOQZU[/YOUTUBE]

    Big Three, step aside for Rondo - NBA - Yahoo! Sports

    BOSTON – Doc Rivers had watched his players march angrily off that charter flight a year ago, the coach’s warnings unheeded of a team meeting gone terribly. The Celtics were leaving a humiliating loss in Cleveland, and Rajon Rondo had this big idea to commandeer a conversation in the
    back of the plane. Bad bleeping idea, Rivers predicted. Bad bleeping idea.

    Between liftoff and touch down in Philadelphia, Rondo had managed somehow to broaden the gulf between the Big Three and himself. This turned into young vs. old on the Celtics, and too many of his veteran teammates believed that he had used his peers as pawns to air his own grievances. He lost standing in the locker room, lost credibility with Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce
    and Ray Allen.

    “He had to understand that leadership was a full-time job, especially when you have to lead three Hall of Famers,” Rivers told Yahoo! Sports in a private moment Sunday evening.

    Rivers was standing in the hallway, tie askew, shirt soaked and season saved. This had been an epic performance out of Rondo in a stunning 97-87 Game 4 victory over the Cavaliers. At 6-foot nothing, Rondo had delivered a surreal performance: 29 points, 18 rebounds and 13 assists. He never stopped pressuring the ball, never stopped disrupting the Cavaliers’ offense.

    The Celtics were close to the end. Rivers could decide to walk away and return to his family home in Florida. Allen is a free agent. Garnett and Pierce are on the decline. Last call for the core of a champion, last stand. This didn’t just go down with the best all-around Celtics performances in history, but the best ever. Only Wilt Chamberlain and Oscar Robertson ever had such an outlandish scoring, rebounding and passing performance in the playoffs.

    The Celtics needed a little Wilt, a little Big O to survive LeBron James(notes) and the Cavs. Rondo is a fascinating and unique talent, a brassy point guard
    with style and flair and the ego to never, ever back down.


    There’s no transition from the Big Three to Rondo. It’s happening. Truth be told, it’s happened. Kendrick Perkins(notes) doesn’t hide it anymore. He calls
    Rondo “our best player,” and no one argues with him. Rivers had resisted for a long time, but no more. He’s ridden Rondo as hard as any player he’s ever coached, largely because Rivers had poured himself into Rondo, a smart, stubborn and willful player who had had gone about a partnership with the Big Three too wrong, for too long.

    “I think the player has to earn it,” Rivers said in the hallway. “You could see how good he was. You could see how talented he was. But every time he had a bad moment – a bad game, a flare-up where he lost his temper with another player – he would have to win that credibility full-time.

    “To me, what Rondo has done is this: He’s done it with his play, and he’s done it with his actions. That allows people to buy in, because they have to buy in. You have to sell that to three guys like that. They have to believe in you all the time. That took a lot of work by Rondo. Last year was up and down – even in the playoffs it was up and down.

    “This year it’s been constant, and I think that’s been the biggest swing. If you can convince Kevin Garnett to follow you, then you’ve done a hell of a job.”

    “And Kevin believes in him.”

    Everyone believes now. The sheer brilliance of his performance mesmerized the Garden. Beneath those 17 champion banners, people aren’t easily impressed. Larry Bird never had a playoff game like this. Nor Bill Russell. Kevin McHale. Bob Cousy. John Havlicek. No one. Not ever.

    Rondo fired 50- and 60-foot passes through the air, catching teammates in strides for dunks. He fired bullets through the maze of passes and Cavalier arms and legs for back-door slams. He tossed lobs for jams. When LeBron James was chasing him down, trying to catch him on the break and pin the ball against the backboard, he deftly flipped the ball behind his back to Tony Allen(notes) for a dunk.

    “His performance was unbelievable,” James said.

    He made twisting, driving shots. He made jumpers. He chased rebounds to the edge of the floor, fought his way through traffic to pluck them out the air. Smallest player on the floor and 18 rebounds. Smallest player on the floor, yet those three Hall of Famers understand that wherever they go now, Rondo takes them.

    “We try to tell him to get his little ass out of there,” Garnett said, “but when he’s getting 18 [rebounds], what can you say?”

    Most of all, Rivers marveled over the way Rondo did everything else and still picked up those Cavalier guards full-court with relentless ball pressure, refusing to let them get into an offense. Rivers had wanted to get him out of the game, rest him for a few minutes, because no one can keep going like that. No one. “You tired?” Rivers kept asking Rondo. “You tired?”

    He would give him a breather, just for a moment, and hustle back into the game. Only Rondo kept nodding, “No,” and he dug down deeper, and kept coming and coming for these Cavs. Twenty-four hours earlier, Rivers gathered the Celtics for a 10-minute film session on the Cavs’ 124-95 Game 3 thrashing. This was no time to beat down the Celtics.


    “This [film session] is about tomorrow, not yesterday,” Rivers told his players. Before him, the coach’s eyes caught those of Garnett’s and Rondo’s. “You could see them saying, ‘Yes,’ ” Rivers said, and he knew that’s where his leadership would be for Game 4 – those were the two who would lift these Celtics out of a state of temporary disrepair.

    “Let’s call this what it was: for Cleveland, a close-out game,” Rivers told Yahoo! Sports. “If they win this game, it’s a close-out game. They didn’t just beat us, they rocked us. … In that 48-minute period, all I could think about was getting them back.”

    They would come back with a relentlessness that left James with three points in the fourth quarter, including nothing over the final five and a half minutes. The Cavs have an angry Shaquille O’Neal(notes), who was privately seething over never getting off the bench in the fourth. Shaq wouldn’t talk, but James essentially second-guessed his coach, Mike Brown, in the interview room.

    The Cavaliers have things to iron out before Tuesday night’s Game 5. James raised the idea of covering Rondo himself.

    Nevertheless, the pressure’s on them. They should’ve put away the Celtics, and they haven’t done it. Everything is on the line for that franchise, and Boston has deep belief in its ability to win again in Cleveland. Brown’s job, James’ free agency, the franchise’s future – Rajon Rondo threw all of it into doubt on Sunday.

    On his way to the interview room Sunday evening, Rondo turned a corner and bumped into his coach. Rivers teased his point guard that he was tired of gushing about him, rubbed his head and even the stone-sober Rondo had to smile. This had been a performance for the ages. Anyway, Rondo kept walking, kept moving toward the podium, toward Game 5 in Cleveland, and they all knew now. No more meeting gone awry, no more egos hurt with that touch of Rondo arrogance. Wherever these Celtics go now, Rajon Rondo takes them.

  5. #35
    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Yay! Go Lakers! Buh-bye Jazz.
    Don't slap me, cause I'm not in the mood!

  6. #36
    Elite Member msdeb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by celeb_2006 View Post
    Everyone believes now. The sheer brilliance of his performance mesmerized the Garden. Beneath those 17 champion banners, people arenít easily impressed. Larry Bird never had a playoff game like this. Nor Bill Russell. Kevin McHale. Bob Cousy. John Havlicek. No one. Not ever.

    ugh, what an overwritten article. While I love love my Celtics, that article makes it seem like Rondo is the God of all Basketball. He's really good, but to put him in the same sentence as Larry Bird, Bill Russell and Havlicek? no no no.

    now, i'll also say Thank heaven that Rondo stepped it up Sunday, otherwise we'd be down 3 to 1.
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  7. #37
    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by msdeb View Post
    ugh, what an overwritten article. While I love love my Celtics, that article makes it seem like Rondo is the God of all Basketball. He's really good, but to put him in the same sentence as Larry Bird, Bill Russell and Havlicek? no no no.

    now, i'll also say Thank heaven that Rondo stepped it up Sunday, otherwise we'd be down 3 to 1.
    Just another one of Ohio's great contributions to the world of sports. He is still viewed reverentially in the eyes of my parents.
    Don't slap me, cause I'm not in the mood!

  8. #38
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    Jeezus the Cavs stunk up the court. Lebron disappeared (again).

    Hopefully he'll come back next game, because if he doesn't, it may be his last as a Cavalier.

    You know, the perennial woe is me whine fest, how he needs a 'supporting cast,' this, and that. I think he's already thinking of which team he's going to next.

  9. #39
    Elite Member msdeb's Avatar
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    I'm not gonna trash talk BUT
    WAY TO KICK ASSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS
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  10. #40
    Elite Member MontanaMama's Avatar
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    After that ass-whoopery, trash talk to your hearts content. I was only cheering for the fans booing.

    LeBron sure pulled a Kobe last night, I don't know what the problem is, but damn that was an intentional tank if I ever saw one.
    If i hear one more personal attack, i will type while drunk, then you can cry! - Bugdoll
    (716): I'd call her a cunt, but she doesn't seem to have the depth or warmth
    Quote Originally Posted by shedevilang View Post
    (Replying to MontanaMama) This is some of the smartest shit I ever read

  11. #41
    Elite Member msdeb's Avatar
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    i only trash talk when we play the Lakers.
    Basic rule of Gossip Rocks: Don't be a dick.Tati
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  12. #42
    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    I did not even watch the end of that one.

    C'mon Cavs! You have to win through so you can play for the title against my beloved Lakers and lose of course to the brilliance of Kobe and Fisher.
    Don't slap me, cause I'm not in the mood!

  13. #43
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    (Ouch! But I think Lebron will have a strong performance next game)

    LeBron’s moment of truth awaits - NBA - Yahoo! Sports

    CLEVELAND – This isn’t important enough to LeBron James(notes). That’s the uncompromising, unconquerable truth. Everything has come too easy to him, and he still doesn’t believe that winning championships takes a consuming, obsessive desire that borders on the maniacal. He is chasing high school and college kids on recruiting trips for his fledgling marketing company, medicating his insecurities with unending and unfolding free-agent dramas.

    James is chasing Warren Buffett and Jay-Z the way he should be chasing Russell and Jordan and Bryant. He wants CEOs to bow before him, engage him as though he is a contemporary on the frontlines of industry. Only, the truth of the matter is, he’s a singular talent who’s going to watch his playoff failures start to chip away at the thing that seems to matter most to him: his marketability and magnetism.

    Most of all, James is forever selling something of himself – an ideal, an image, a possibility. Something nebulous, something promised. He’s chasing a global platform, the bright, blinking billion-dollar fortune, and he’s largely gotten the natural order of things backward.

    Stop strutting, stop preening, stop stomping away as an ungracious winner, a sore loser, and win something, LeBron.

    Win something now.

    No more excuses. Not now, not after this biblical bottoming out that pushes the Cleveland Cavaliers to the brink of an unthinkable collapse. And yet, after Tuesday’s ferocious failure of his professional career, the encompassing embarrassment of a 120-88 Game 5 loss to the Boston Celtics, James dismissed his unthinkably poor performance with this colossal cop-out: “I spoil a lot of people with my play. When you have three bad games in seven years, it’s easy to point them out.”

    Who is he to be indignant after he gave a playoff game away? What’s he ever won to be so smug to the masses? That’s what drives the Celtics crazy about James. Eventually, he will understand his greatness isn’t measured on the hit-and-runs through NBA cities across a long season. It’s measured now, in the teeth of the battle, when a tiny guard, Rajon Rondo(notes), has stolen his stage and nearly a series.

    Somewhere, the whispers of the game’s greatest talents became a murmur louder and louder: James still doesn’t understand part of the price of greatness is inviting the burden on yourself and sparing those around you. He missed 11 of 14 shots. James didn’t score a basket until the third quarter. He was terrible, just terrible, and yet James couldn’t bring himself to say the worst home playoff loss in franchise history began and ended with him.

    For all of James’ unselfishness on the floor, he can still be so selfish off it. They could’ve lined up the greatest players in the game’s history Tuesday night in the primes of their championship lives, and there isn’t one of them who would’ve deflected and deferred like the self-proclaimed King James. They would’ve been livid and they would’ve put it on themselves. Magic Johnson and Larry Bird. Michael Jordan and Kobe Bryant(notes). Tim Duncan(notes) and, yes, Shaquille O’Neal(notes).

    They had titles, and they would’ve mutilated themselves for public consumption. James is too cool, too stubborn and maybe too self-unaware. This is on me, they would’ve told you, and, I’ll get us out of this. They would’ve made sure teammates and opponents, fans and enemies understood. They would’ve made sure the whole world understood: This isn’t how an MVP plays in the playoffs. This isn’t how he lets a legacy linger in limbo. What you heard out of James was self-righteous: “I put a lot of pressure on myself to go out and be great and the best player on the court. When I don’t, I feel bad for myself.”

    This wasn’t the night to feel bad for himself. There’s been enough pity for him in this series. As much as anything these past two years, the Cavaliers have taken on James’ persona: Entitled, arrogant and expectant that the sheer divine right of his greatness will win them a ring. Only, the Celtics are proud, old champions arisen out of the rubble and on the brink of closing out the Cavaliers on Thursday night at the Boston Garden. No one saw this coming on Tuesday night, the surgical removal of the Cavaliers’ hearts surrounded with a stunned silence that devolved into the debris of boos.

    James lorded over one of the most agonizing, humiliating losses a championship contender ever endured. So much comes with this collapse, bookended with decades of a city’s championship sports futility set against the free agency for the son it spawned in neighboring Akron.

    This collapse will cost people jobs. This will change the course of the franchise. Where’s James going? And as job security goes, the CEO of British Petroleum has more going for him than Mike Brown right now. Forty feet away Tuesday night, Kentucky’s John Calipari was sitting under the basket with Leon Rose, the agent Cal shares with his buddy, LeBron.

    James invites these storylines into the gymnasium, this drama, and leaves everyone else to live with the consequences. Owner Dan Gilbert has fostered a culture of permissiveness with James that hasn’t served him or the franchise.

    The Cavs live in fear of him, his moods, his whims, and it’s the reason no one ever tells him the truth: Hey ’Bron, you looked childish for refusing to shake the Orlando Magic’s hands last season. You sounded small grumbling about criticism for your wildly up-and-down play in this series. James walked out of the Q on Tuesday night and there’s no guarantee he’ll ever return as a Cavalier here.

    Yet make no mistake: James has enough around him. This team isn’t perfect, isn’t assured of beating the Los Angeles Lakers, but it has no business losing in the conference semifinals – never mind failing to even compete. And, yes, as much as ever, this is on James.

    He invited all this drama about walking out on his hometown team this summer, and now free agency hung over the Q like an anvil. Here’s a city that’s waited 46 years for a championship, a town that reacts viciously to the sheer suggestion that James could leave for New York this summer. These fans have been much better to James than he’s been to them. It hasn’t been the media that’s built his role in the summer of 2010 to a crescendo, but James himself. He constantly manipulated it with suggestions and hints and wink-winks to New York.

    James proclaimed July 1, 2010, as the biggest day in the history of basketball, ramping up suspense of his ultimate decision: Do I stay or do I go? What it has done is throw more palpable pressure in the air, more desperation, and it’s come back to haunt him now.

    James says the Cavaliers know all about what it takes, but he knows about winning in the regular season. This is a different time, a different game. Three bad games in seven years? He’s kidding himself. Now, he has a championship cast around him. Now, he’ll be judged. No one gives a damn what he did in the regular season.

    Perhaps sooner than later, he’s going to get his coach fired for losing this series. Or the next to Orlando. He’s mocked Brown for acting too angry with the Game 2 thrashing, but the coach understood what James refused to acknowledge until Tuesday night: The Cavs have been wildly inconsistent in these playoffs and they’re nowhere near playing championship ball.

    Across the regular season, James can play hard, let his talent take over and embark on all the side gigs that gobble his time.

    This isn’t a part-time thing. Winning everything takes a single-minded, obsessive devotion. Michael Jordan had it. Kobe Bryant does, too. They didn’t want to win championships, they had to win them. They needed them for validation and identity and, later, they became moguls. LeBron James is running around recruiting college kids to his marketing company. He picks up the phone, tells them, “This is the King,” and makes his pitch to be represented in his stable. Think Kobe would ever bother with this? Or Michael? Not a chance when they were on the climb, not when they still had a fist free of rings.

    LeBron James is on the clock now, and Game 6 in Boston could be for his legacy in Cleveland. He has been prancing around the edges for too long now, angling for a transcendent existence he believed his brand could bring him. Only, it’s all a mirage. It’s all vapor until he does the heavy lifting that comes now, that comes in the shadows of Magic and Larry, Michael and Kobe. This isn’t about selling an image to Madison Avenue, about pushing product through all those dazzling plays across the winter months. This is an MVP’s time, his calling, and there was LeBron James standing in the middle of the Cavaliers’ locker room at 11:25 p.m., staring in a long mirror, fixing his shirt before the long walk down the corridor to the interview room.

    James stood there for five seconds and 10 and maybe now 20, just staring into the mirror, just taking a long, long look at himself. For the first time in his career, the first time when it’s all truly on him, maybe the sport stood and stared with him. All hell breaking loose, all on the line now. Forget everything in his life, all the make-believe nonsense, Game 6 and maybe Game 7 will promise to serve as the most honest hours of his basketball life.

  14. #44
    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    ^^^ Good post.

    the surgical removal of the Cavaliersí hearts surrounded with a stunned silence that devolved into the debris of boos.
    ooops... *puts on armor*
    Don't slap me, cause I'm not in the mood!

  15. #45
    Elite Member msdeb's Avatar
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    MISSING PERSON ALERT Lebron Raymone JAMES
    Cleveland OH age 25 DOB 12/30/84. Reported missing 5/10/10.Last seen
    being taken to school by Rajon Rondo of the Boston Celtics.Not heard
    of since Nike stopped running puppet commercials.Last seen wearing
    false crown. James may be in need of medical attention for SAS (sudden
    apathy syndrome).Any info helping authorities find James or his game
    contact 1-800-brick-23



    this was on my Facebook this morning. LOL
    Basic rule of Gossip Rocks: Don't be a dick.Tati
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