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Thread: How China Trains Its Children To Win Gold In Olympic Games

  1. #31
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    There is no excuse for physically abusing children.

  2. #32
    Elite Member dexter7's Avatar
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    i totally agree mohanda. and i can't believe that people think torturing children has ANY place in achieving an olympic gold medal.

    the USA has received gold medal in previous olypmics as well. gabby is not just uniquely brilliant, the usa has received gold medals (periodically) in gymnastics throughout the past 30 plus years. i can't believe that anyone would make excuses for torturing children. i respect Rusalka and olivia as posters, but i can't lie, i am slightly disgusted that you guys support "stretching" children to the point of causing them outright harsh pain. pain that goes beyond feeling sore the next day......this is pain that is causing traumatic tears and trauma. wtf?

  3. #33
    Elite Member witchcurlgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MohandasKGanja View Post
    There is no excuse for physically abusing children.

    Thank you. I can't believe people don't get the difference between tough training and outright abuse.
    All of God's children are not beautiful. Most of God's children are, in fact, barely presentable.


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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by dexter7 View Post

    . i respect Rusalka and olivia as posters, but i can't lie, i am slightly disgusted that you guys support "stretching" children to the point of causing them outright harsh pain. pain that goes beyond feeling sore the next day......this is pain that is causing traumatic tears and trauma. wtf?
    "Support" is too strong a word. I wouldn't put my own kid through it, but I have better choices for my non-existent children.

    My favorite female athlete is Syvie Guillem. Her parents raised her to be a gymnast but then she was discovered by the Paris Ballet. From the age of eleven she has gone through a grueling schedule to remain a phenomenal dancer. I've seen videos of her, now as an adult, sobbing in pain and exhaustion backstage. How does she deal with it? She was trained from her earliest childhood to deal with it.

    Now, don't we tell boys to "tough it out" in order to play peewee football? Don't we put them through brutal training to make them better at a sport we all love? Isn't it harsh and aren't boys trained to deal with their pain and exhaustion?

    Where is the line? Honestly, I don't know.

    I love football. I love the results of the years of work Sylvie Guillem put in to be a dancer. We want to see the best, right? We want talent to explode for our viewing, right? Well, most of those people we love watching started early and it wasn't easy.
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  5. #35
    Elite Member ManxMouse's Avatar
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    So maybe I'm not seeing it right, but in the first photo, it looks like the girl's legs are completely hyperextending the wrong way to the point of breaking. ???
    Santa is an elitist mother fucker -- giving expensive shit to rich kids and nothing to poor kids.

  6. #36
    Elite Member witchcurlgirl's Avatar
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    ^you're seeing it exactly right.


    If these abusive methods are so essential to the makings of a true champion, how come the chinese women have never had one?
    All of God's children are not beautiful. Most of God's children are, in fact, barely presentable.


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  7. #37
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    You have adults willfully stepping on screaming little kids. In most places, that would get you an aggravated assault charge, and a ban from working with children.

    Added to that, these were not surreptiitious hidden cam shots. Which means that the coaches and the Chinese officials think this is okay.

    It makes me wonder what they do when cameras aren't around.

  8. #38
    Elite Member Rusalka's Avatar
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    I think this article provides an interesting perspective:

    How did China get to be so good at gymnastics? - Telegraph

    On the walls of the huge, hangar-like building that is China’s National Gymnastics Centre in Beijing are words of encouragement. “Avoid bent knees, split legs, bent feet, land firmly and you can win gold,” reads one message. “Starting from nothing, we can forge gold, and the gold will shine,” reads another. The Chinese men’s gymnastic team did just that last week at the Olympics, ahead of Japan, Great Britain and the US.

    Those slogans could probably be seen as old-style Maoist indoctrination, especially when taken with the subtext, implicit in much Western sports commentary before and during London 2012, that all Chinese athletes originate from a conveyor belt churning out identical, soulless competitors.
    But do those words in Beijing actually differ from the “Go USA” signs displayed in American gyms, or the Union flags favoured here?

    It seems that words and sports take on another meaning in the context of China. Ask Western gymnasts who have been to the elite facility in Beijing, and they will tell you the training is the same as elsewhere, and rather than being products of a brutal sports machine, Chinese athletes simply work harder.

    Indeed, what we observed when we were given unprecedented access to the National Gymnastics Centre between 2009 and 2010 contrasted enormously with Western dogma. Our invitation to be the first Western photographers to enter the centre came after the Beijing Olympics. The Chinese head coach admired our previous work, but we think the decision to let us in was also prompted by a new confidence the 2008 Games had created among Chinese sporting authorities. They were comfortable with who they were, and felt ready to show the world a truly extraordinary and inspiring process. A country that one generation previously had only infrequently succeeded in world gymnastics was now dominating it. And the question being asked was: how did China get so good?

    There is no simple answer. It is hard to pin down what made the facility so similar yet so different to others we have visited and photographed. We saw nothing that we felt was wrong or excessive – and, given the frequency and duration of our visits, it is inconceivable that behaviour was modified in our presence. We saw only dedicated coaches working with professionalism and humanity, and athletes who were welcoming and hardworking.

    There is certainly old-fashioned respect in the relationship between pupil and teacher, and a notable absence of the petulant attitude towards authority sometimes seen in the West. We saw one gymnast being given a tough, hour-long critique of his training. He stood there and listened; it can’t have been much fun, but he took it all. That gymnast has just won team gold in
    London.

    There was also a powerful sense of individuals working together as a group. The coaches don’t treat athletes as automatons, but instead seek to understand what makes each gymnast tick, their strengths, their weaknesses; coaxing out their character as well as technical abilities. That is the way, they believe, to bring out the best in them.

    Athletes everywhere show extraordinary levels of dedication to reach the top, of course, but in Beijing there was an extra edge. There was the girl, for example, who returned time after time to perform the same exercise on the beam until she had mastered it, and the men doing handstands for up to 20 minutes with heavy weights on their waists and feet. They seemed to push themselves harder. They seemed to have more intensity amid the sweat, tears, laughter and chalk dust, more sheer effort, more sheer determination.
    During our visits, we developed a dialogue with the gymnasts, half-spoken (some had good English, others a few words) and half-mimed. Again, we found they were the same as Western youngsters in similar situations. They worked hard with their coaches. They joked with their colleagues and us. And they focused. Interestingly, it is their character, not the training, that we remember the most.

    Then there was the camaraderie: we saw genuine collective joy at simply being part of this extraordinary process. Whether assisting with exercises, offering encouragement, inspiring others, or larking around, the bond between the Chinese gymnasts seemed special. Perhaps it is partly the result of so many athletes of all ages being in one location. But there was also an awareness of how success could transform their lives so much more than it would for most Western athletes.

    The Chinese are not perfect; neither is the West. The Chinese are amazing; so is the West. The Olympian ideal celebrates human achievement irrespective of nationality, ethnicity or creed. Sport really can build bridges and create bonds between different peoples. Perhaps, at this time of sporting frenzy, remembering this ideal could benefit both the Games and humanity as a whole.

  9. #39
    Elite Member witchcurlgirl's Avatar
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    Indeed, what we observed when we were given unprecedented access to the National Gymnastics Centre between 2009 and 2010 contrasted enormously with Western dogma.
    yep. the same way Theresienstadt was shown to the Red Cross as a nice place. the chinese government would certainly never engage in deceit.


    There was also a powerful sense of individuals working together as a group. The coaches don’t treat athletes as automatons, but instead seek to understand what makes each gymnast tick, their strengths, their weaknesses; coaxing out their character as well as technical abilities. That is the way, they believe, to bring out the best in them.
    This is so opposite the reality of China and it's culture that I find it hard to believe. Nothing in their business, educational, sociological or cultural systems remotely emphasizes the individual over the collective.


    Chinese athletes simply work harder.
    or else.
    Last edited by witchcurlgirl; August 10th, 2012 at 10:53 PM.
    dexter7, Snarker and lizzybabe like this.
    All of God's children are not beautiful. Most of God's children are, in fact, barely presentable.


    If I wanted the government in my womb I'd fuck a Senator

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