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Thread: Request Thread - For recipes suitable to Type II Diabetes folks.

  1. #16
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Thanks Ladies - I think I really should have specified that I was hoping for all types of recipes, not just dessert/cake ones?

    One area we may struggle in is that he like potatoes - I can take or leave them.... And a friend at work mentioned that they were given a leaflet on "hidden sugars" (yes, she's looking for it for me) when he hubby was having issues.

    Quote Originally Posted by Moongirl View Post
    Moongirl you beaut! Thank you!
    ETA - I've signed up for their newsletter as well, thanks!
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  2. #17
    Elite Member Waterslide's Avatar
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    If I remember correctly, the book I mentioned has all kinds of food in it. I'll let you know though.

    I was trying to ease back on hidden sugars, but my first plans of attack were bread and pasta. I don't have a scientific reasoning for it, so this doesn't mean anything, but I think a little bit of potatoes is OK. Maybe, he can eat half a serving of potatoes instead of what he normally eats, or possibly eat them less times a week. There's also some thing where if you eat them before 3 pm, your body will burn the sugar off more efficiently than if you eat them too close to bedtime. I'm never sure though. Some people I know with diabetes can't have one particle of sugar while other people "save up" and go for ice cream once a week. I thought you had to go cold turkey on anything sweet and moderate the hidden ones. Anyway, I know a lot of people make mashed cauliflowers instead of potatoes. I've eaten it pureed, but I don't think that's the same thing.
    Gross, put it away. You could dress beautifully but you gotta be Miss Granny Panty Whore.
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  3. #18
    Elite Member Moongirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novice View Post
    Thanks Ladies - I think I really should have specified that I was hoping for all types of recipes, not just dessert/cake ones?

    One area we may struggle in is that he like potatoes - I can take or leave them.... And a friend at work mentioned that they were given a leaflet on "hidden sugars" (yes, she's looking for it for me) when he hubby was having issues.


    Moongirl you beaut! Thank you!
    ETA - I've signed up for their newsletter as well, thanks!
    You're welcome

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waterslide View Post
    If I remember correctly, the book I mentioned has all kinds of food in it. I'll let you know though.

    I was trying to ease back on hidden sugars, but my first plans of attack were bread and pasta. I don't have a scientific reasoning for it, so this doesn't mean anything, but I think a little bit of potatoes is OK. Maybe, he can eat half a serving of potatoes instead of what he normally eats, or possibly eat them less times a week. There's also some thing where if you eat them before 3 pm, your body will burn the sugar off more efficiently than if you eat them too close to bedtime. I'm never sure though. Some people I know with diabetes can't have one particle of sugar while other people "save up" and go for ice cream once a week. I thought you had to go cold turkey on anything sweet and moderate the hidden ones. Anyway, I know a lot of people make mashed cauliflowers instead of potatoes. I've eaten it pureed, but I don't think that's the same thing.
    Are you type II too?


    starvhs turn to sugar in digestion, so pots, pasta, etc need to be limited (IIRC), sugars ditto. Hidden sugars are the ones (eg) in fruits & starchy veg, so I'm thinking legumes?
    The low carb Atkins stuff will help I feel but I just wondered if any of our Type II peeps had any faves they wanted to share (like the pineapple cake or any mains?), I know we have a couple (A*O & MsDeb) who have been particularly useful in the past ....
    Free Charmed.

  5. #20
    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
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    A*0 is off cruising with her mater. Msdeb should be along. Meanwhile :

    Our Best Diabetic Side Dish Recipes

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  6. #21
    Elite Member Waterslide's Avatar
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    *I don't know why this thread hates me. I've tried to post this 3 times and now I've forgotten what I typed. Gah! So.....

    @ Novice - No I'm not diabetic, but I have close friends and family who are, plus I've been reading a lot about unnecessary sugars lately. My good cholesterol is on the low side, so I've been cutting back on sugars, bread, pasta, rice, etc., just as a precaution. It's nothing too serious as far as I know.

    It was easier for me to cut out bread, pasta and rice, so I allow myself potatoes. It's obviously not from a medical, scientific or nutritional standpoint, but I figure they grow in the ground and they're OK in moderation for me. I figure they're not as bad as eating a bread or pasta.

    I'm a little confused about soda though. My doctor says regular soda (either with cane sugar or the dread HFCS) is evil, and to drink diet soda. My other doctor says don't ever drink diet soda because your body doesn't know how to break down the artificial sugar and it turns to fat and that even HFCS isn't as evil as that. Soda is the one almost daily vice I can't quite shake for some reason. I swear it's not the sugar I'm addicted to, it's the carbonation. The rest of my day I usually drink unsweetened tea and water.

    I got the Sugar Rut book from my mom and they have a lot of potato recipes which clearly is not going to help. Mostly they're substituting honey and vinegars for sugar as far as I can tell so far.
    Gross, put it away. You could dress beautifully but you gotta be Miss Granny Panty Whore.
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  7. #22
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    So the sugar book is about not using refined sugars, rather than a book for diabetics?

    Regarding the carbonated - get carbonated water or soda water it's free of sugars & calories & so much better for you.

    I had an email from my work friend today & that was very helpful, however, if anyone has any favourite recipes pls feel free to post them.
    Free Charmed.

  8. #23
    Elite Member Waterslide's Avatar
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    Yeah, this Out of the Sugar Rut book was actually given to us by my friend's mom who was a nurse and my friend had diabetes. She couldn't eat candy, cookies, cake, absolutely nothing like that, but as far as I remember she could eat bread and potatoes, so maybe things have changed since way back then? Anyway, that's why I thought it was for diabetics, not just for general health. I bet the American Diabetes link that was posted is probably a better choice since this is more about getting rid of refined sugar and white flour (whole wheat flour, honey, and that sort of thing are in here.) (This thing came out in the 70s and they're already talking about how eggs aren't the devil, but sugar, flour and caffeine are. I remember when it was a mortal sin to have a boiled egg because of the cholesterol, but I digress...)

    I know I should get carbonated water, but it always goes flat so fast and it tastes funky to me...outside of booze, that is. LOL I probably just need to woman up and get past the love for bubbles.
    Gross, put it away. You could dress beautifully but you gotta be Miss Granny Panty Whore.
    ~Manx Mouse

    Life is a hell of a thing to happen to a person.

  9. #24
    Elite Member DeadDwarf's Avatar
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    I have gestational diabetes so I am on a diabetic diet. I don't do well with regular whole grain breads, but I found that I can eat whole wheat pita bread for sandwich wraps, whole wheat tortillas and whole wheat English muffins. For pasta I can eat a smaller serving of whole wheat pasta and I can eat spaghetti as long as I eat a lot of meat with it and I have found low sugar pasta sauce made by ragu that doesn't spike my numbers. I found breyer's low carb ice cream to taste good and help when I crave a nice dessert. Also- fiber one makes 90 calorie brownies that are great. I don't eat any white bread or white pasta, or any rice (not even whole wheat rice).

    I eat a lot of turkey, chicken and beef. Lower fat cheeses and eggs too. Turkey sausage and turkey bacon. I have made mashed cauliflowers with cheese for mashed potatoes and it was great. I love burritos and can eat them on whole wheat with lots of meat, cheese, avocado, sour cream, etc. I can eat corn tortillas too, but usually stay away from starchy veggies like carrots and corn. I eat salads and use vinegrette dressings. Snacks I eat are string cheese, peanut butter with ritz crackers, low cal yogurt, whole wheat pita chips with hummus. I eat every 2-3 hours, I eat protein with every meal/snack. I eat a protein only snack before bed and try to walk once a day. I drink water, flavored water, crystal light and diet soda on occasion. I can't drink milk since I am lactose intolerant, but I do drink soy milk. Breakfast is my hardest meal so I mainly eat protein to keep my blood sugar from going crazy.

    I have found I can eat nearly all I did before, I just had to modify it and try to eat more protein/fat with my carbs. If I want to eat out I will get a burger wrapped in lettuce and eat a small serving of fries. If my kids want take out we might get kids meals- I do great with chicken nuggets and a small fry. Small sandwiches from Subway seem to be fine when I load it with veggies and meat.

    For me I have found that everyone is different and you have to figure out what foods your body responds well to so food journals and charting blood sugar levels are great when you are doing recipes and portions. sorry, I don't have any specific recipes since I just use lower sugar ingredients, increase protein/fats and limit portion sizes depending on carb content. Oh and I try to sleep 7-8 hours, exercise, avoid caffeine and stress since those things factor in blood sugar.

    Hope some of this was a little helpful.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waterslide View Post
    Yeah, this Out of the Sugar Rut book was actually given to us by my friend's mom who was a nurse and my friend had diabetes. She couldn't eat candy, cookies, cake, absolutely nothing like that, but as far as I remember she could eat bread and potatoes, so maybe things have changed since way back then? Anyway, that's why I thought it was for diabetics, not just for general health. I bet the American Diabetes link that was posted is probably a better choice since this is more about getting rid of refined sugar and white flour (whole wheat flour, honey, and that sort of thing are in here.) (This thing came out in the 70s and they're already talking about how eggs aren't the devil, but sugar, flour and caffeine are. I remember when it was a mortal sin to have a boiled egg because of the cholesterol, but I digress...)

    I know I should get carbonated water, but it always goes flat so fast and it tastes funky to me...outside of booze, that is. LOL I probably just need to woman up and get past the love for bubbles.
    You need to take care choosing the water then, Pelligrano is nice & tastes nice flat too.
    Quote Originally Posted by DeadDwarf View Post
    I have gestational diabetes so I am on a diabetic diet. I don't do well with regular whole grain breads, but I found that I can eat whole wheat pita bread for sandwich wraps, whole wheat tortillas and whole wheat English muffins. For pasta I can eat a smaller serving of whole wheat pasta and I can eat spaghetti as long as I eat a lot of meat with it and I have found low sugar pasta sauce made by ragu that doesn't spike my numbers. I found breyer's low carb ice cream to taste good and help when I crave a nice dessert. Also- fiber one makes 90 calorie brownies that are great. I don't eat any white bread or white pasta, or any rice (not even whole wheat rice).

    I eat a lot of turkey, chicken and beef. Lower fat cheeses and eggs too. Turkey sausage and turkey bacon. I have made mashed cauliflowers with cheese for mashed potatoes and it was great. I love burritos and can eat them on whole wheat with lots of meat, cheese, avocado, sour cream, etc. I can eat corn tortillas too, but usually stay away from starchy veggies like carrots and corn. I eat salads and use vinegrette dressings. Snacks I eat are string cheese, peanut butter with ritz crackers, low cal yogurt, whole wheat pita chips with hummus. I eat every 2-3 hours, I eat protein with every meal/snack. I eat a protein only snack before bed and try to walk once a day. I drink water, flavored water, crystal light and diet soda on occasion. I can't drink milk since I am lactose intolerant, but I do drink soy milk. Breakfast is my hardest meal so I mainly eat protein to keep my blood sugar from going crazy.

    I have found I can eat nearly all I did before, I just had to modify it and try to eat more protein/fat with my carbs. If I want to eat out I will get a burger wrapped in lettuce and eat a small serving of fries. If my kids want take out we might get kids meals- I do great with chicken nuggets and a small fry. Small sandwiches from Subway seem to be fine when I load it with veggies and meat.

    For me I have found that everyone is different and you have to figure out what foods your body responds well to so food journals and charting blood sugar levels are great when you are doing recipes and portions. sorry, I don't have any specific recipes since I just use lower sugar ingredients, increase protein/fats and limit portion sizes depending on carb content. Oh and I try to sleep 7-8 hours, exercise, avoid caffeine and stress since those things factor in blood sugar.

    Hope some of this was a little helpful.
    Yes, this was helpful!!!! Our whole sleep cycle is f*cked, we can't avoid stress but I have to have decaf anyway so thats 1 out of 3. LOL!

    The link to the DUSA site was really helpful, I've found loads of helpful data (my red)
    Navigating MyFoodAdvisor

    Can I eat this? ...Meal Planning and Tips

    Managing diabetes is a challenge that requires finding the right balance between food, physical activity, and medicine, if needed. Healthful food is key to managing diabetes. Only you can decide what to eat and using a meal plan as a guide can make it easier. Discover more about meal planning options and how MyFoodAdvisor can help.

    Exploring Foods

    My Food Advisor is based on a database of about 5,000 foods ranging from basic recipe ingredients like flour to fresh and frozen food to restaurant entrees.
    The MyFoodAdvisor database of foods can be searched under Explore Foods by:

    • name of a food
    • setting nutrition criteria for calories, carbohydrates, saturated fat, fiber and sodium
    • browsing a food category

    Once you find a food you want to explore further, you can:

    • compare it to another food
    • ask for healthier alternatives
    • add it to your plate to get a grand total of calories, carbohydrate and twenty other nutrients for a meal, a recipe or a whole day of food in our Create a Dish tool!


    Nutrition Criteria

    For the "healthier alternatives" option with MyFoodAdvisor, foods are ranked within each food category getting negative points for saturated fat and sodium and positive points for containing nutrients like dietary fiber or calcium. Because amounts of carbohydrate are similar within each food group, the priority was placed on ranking foods to minimize sodium and saturated fat and promote high-fiber foods.

    Food Categories

    The food categories are based on the 2007 version of the American Diabetes Association and American Dietetic Association Exchange Lists for Diabetes. The foods in each category are based on about the same amount of carbohydrate. So the serving sizes that pop up under starches and grains will be different from what you see on the nutrition facts label.

    Because managing carbohydrate is the cornerstone of glycemic control, MyFoodAdvisor allows you to view equal amounts of carbohydrate and protein in foods, so you can focus your time on picking foods with the healthiest type of fat and lower sodium foods. By organizing the database this way, you will be able to easily compare foods within each food group to find the best choices for you.

    In general:


    • The serving size for foods in the starch/grain, fruit, and dessert categories will be based on 15 grams of carbohydrate. You can look for foods with the lowest amounts of saturated and trans fat as well as find foods with the most fiber.
    • The serving size for foods in the milk/yogurt category is based on 12 grams of carbohydrate. You can search for the dairy products with the smallest amount of saturated fat.
    • The serving size for foods in the meat, poultry, fish, and meat alternatives are based on 7 grams of protein. You can easily search for the leanest protein sources (i.e. the lowest amount of saturated fat).
    • The serving size for foods in the fat group is based on 5 grams of total fat so you can search for the foods with more monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and omega 3 fats.

    Food category icons help you to identify in which food category a food belongs.

    • Free
    • Starch
    • Fruit
    • Milk and yogurt
    • Other carbohydrate



    • Nonstarchy vegetable
    • Meat, lean
    • Meat, medium fat
    • Meat, high fat
    • Fat



    Compare Foods

    The "Compare foods to" button allows you to put foods side by side. Which has more fat or fiber? It's easy to tell when you can see them at the same time. From comparing foods you can add a food to your Dish, search for a healthier alternative or start your search over again. It's a great way to learn about foods and make decisions about some options you might like to try.

    Healthier Alternatives

    Healthier alternatives are foods within the same category that are overall higher in fiber and lower in saturated fat and sodium than the food you selected. The amount of carbohydrates and protein is about the same for every food in a category, so this allows you to focus on selecting foods with more fiber and less saturated fat and sodium in your diet.
    The food alternatives may not be an appropriate substitution for the food you chose, but it will give you ideas of other foods to try at your next meal.

    Create a Dish

    Want to know how what you eat matches up to your meal plan? Want to analyze your favorite recipes? Help keep yourself on track by using our "Create a Dish" tool. You'll be able to get nutrition information on what you've eaten or tally up the ingredients for your favorite recipe.
    Find out if what you're eating has too much carbohydrate or saturated fat or not enough fiber to meet your meal plan goals. Easily see the contribution of each food to the total so you can make adjustments to your favorite meals.

    My Goals

    Set your own goals for how much total carbohydrate, calories, saturated fat, sodium and dietary fiber are in your meal plan. you can set goals for a day, a week or just one meal. it's up to you. You can then enter what you actually eat, or plan your meals in the Track it feature and get a comparison of how well the two match up. Don't have a meal plan? You can use our default settings to get you started.

    Track it

    Keep track of what you are eating from day to day or meal to meal. You can add individual foods from the database, recipes from your recipe box, or meals and dishes you've created using the Create a Dish feature. After tracking, get feedback in either a table or graph format to compare how close you are to your goals. If you are not on track with your goals, try using our healthier alternative feature to find other options for your meal plan.

    Meal Planning

    Of the foods you eat, those with carbohydrate raise blood glucose so they are the key to managing blood glucose levels. This does not mean you have to eliminate carbohydrate from your diet. It means you need to think about how much you're eating, make the best choices you can, know your limits, and keep your portions under control.
    The other things to keep in mind are cutting back on saturated fat, cholesterol and trans fat. All three of these are linked to high blood cholesterol levels and increase your risk of heart disease. So the two main things to consider are carbohydrate and the "bad fats." To help you put it all together it is sometimes easier to follow a guide of what to eat or a meal plan. Two popular types of meal planning are carbohydrate counting and creating your plate.

    Carbohydrate Counting

    There are many options that people with diabetes use to help them plan their meals. One of the most popular ways to plan meals is by counting carbohydrates. MyFoodAdvisor can help! Foods that contain carbohydrate raise blood glucose. By keeping track of how many carbohydrates you eat and setting a limit for your maximum amount to eat, you can help to keep your blood glucose levels in your target range. Finding the right amount of carbohydrate depends on many things including how active you are and what medicines you take.

    How much carb?

    A place to start is at about 45-60 grams of carbohydrate at a meal. You may need more or less carbohydrate at meals depending on your activity level, your age and the medicines you take. You can your health care team can figure out the right amount for you. Once you know how much carb to eat at a meal, choose your foods and the portion size to match.


    What foods have carbohydrate?

    Foods that contain carbohydrate are:

    • starchy foods like bread, cereal, rice and cracker
    • fruit and juice
    • milk and yogurt
    • dried beans like pinto beans and soy products like veggie burgers
    • starchy vegetables like potatoes and corn
    • sweets and snack foods like sodas, juice drinks, cake, cookies, candy, and chips

    Nonstarchy vegetables have a little bit of carbohydrate but in general are very low.

    Using MyFoodAdvisor

    Carbohydrate counting is easier when detailed information is at your fingertips. Using My Food Advisor, you can see how much carbohydrate is in the foods you want to eat and decide how much of the food you can eat. The two most important lines with carbohydrate counting are the serving size and the total carbohydrate amount.

    • Look at the serving size. All the information on the label is about this serving of food.
    • Look at the grams of total carbohydrate. Total carbohydrate on the label includes sugar, starch, and fiber. Know the amount of carb you can eat, figure out the portion size to match.


    Other important label information:

    • If you are trying to lose weight, look at the calories. Comparing products can be helpful to find those lower in calories per serving.
    • To cut risk of heart disease and stroke, look at saturated and trans fats and sodium. Look for products with the lowest amount of saturated and trans fats and sodium per serving.


    Protein and Fat

    With carbohydrate counting, it is easy to forget about the protein and fat in meals. Always include a source of protein and fat to balance out your meal. Use My Food Advisor to find the meats with the least amount of saturated fat and compare the oils to see which have the most monounsaturated fatty acids.

    Create Your Plate

    If carbohydrate counting sounds like too much work, there is a meal planning option for you! It's simple and effective for managing diabetes and losing weight. Try these six simple steps:

    1. Using your dinner plate, put a line down the middle of the plate.
    2. Then on one side, cut it again so you will have 3 sections on your plate.
    3. Fill the largest section with non-starchy vegetables like salad, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, carrots, and tomatoes.
    4. Now in one of the small sections, put starchy foods such as noodles, rice, corn, or potatoes.
    5. And then on the other small section, put your meat or meat substitutes such as fish, chicken, beef, or tofu.
    6. Add an 8 oz glass of milk and a piece of fruit or a 1/2 cup fruit salad and you have your meal planned. If you don't drink milk, you can add an extra piece of fruit, light yogurt, or a small roll.


    and also
    Carbohydrate Counting



    Carbohydrate counting, or "carb counting," is a meal planning technique for managing your blood glucose levels.
    Foods that contain carbohydrate raise blood glucose. By keeping track of how many carbohydrates you eat and setting a limit for your maximum amount to eat, you can help to keep your blood glucose levels in your target range.
    Finding the right amount of carbohydrate depends on many things including how active you are and what, if any, medicines you take. You may also be interested in our book, Diabetes Carbohydrate & Fat Gram Guide.
    How Much Carb?

    A place to start is at about 45-60 grams of carbohydrate at a meal. You may need more or less carbohydrate at meals depending on how you manage your diabetes. You and your health care team can figure out the right amount for you. Once you know how much carb to eat at a meal, choose your food and the portion size to match.
    What Foods Have Carbohydrate?

    Foods that contain carbohydrate are:

    • starchy foods like bread, cereal, rice, and crackers
    • fruit and juice
    • milk and yogurt
    • dried beans like pinto beans and soy products like veggie burgers
    • starchy vegetables like potatoes and corn
    • sweets and snack foods like sodas, juice drinks, cake, cookies, candy, and chips

    Non-starchy vegetables have a little bit of carbohydrate but in general are very low.
    How Much Carbohydrate is in These Foods?

    Reading food labels is a great way to know how much carbohydrate is in a food. For foods that do not have a label, you have to estimate how much carbohydrate is in it. Keeping general serving sizes in mind will help you estimate how much carbohydrate you are eating.
    For example there is about 15 grams of carbohydrate in:


    • 1 small piece of fresh fruit (4 oz)
    • 1/2 cup of canned or frozen fruit
    • 1 slice of bread (1 oz) or 1 (6 inch) tortilla
    • 1/2 cup of oatmeal
    • 1/3 cup of pasta or rice
    • 4-6 crackers
    • 1/2 English muffin or hamburger bun
    • 1/2 cup of black beans or starchy vegetable
    • 1/4 of a large baked potato (3 oz)
    • 2/3 cup of plain fat-free yogurt or sweetened with sugar substitutes
    • 2 small cookies
    • 2 inch square brownie or cake without frosting
    • 1/2 cup ice cream or sherbet
    • 1 Tbsp syrup, jam, jelly, sugar or honey
    • 2 Tbsp light syrup
    • 6 chicken nuggets
    • 1/2 cup of casserole
    • 1 cup of soup
    • 1/4 serving of a medium french fry

    Protein and Fat

    With carbohydrate counting, it is easy to forget about the protein and fat in meals. Always include a source of protein and fat to balance out your meal.
    Using Food Labels

    Carbohydrate counting is easier when food labels are available. You can look at how much carbohydrate is in the foods you want to eat and decide how much of the food you can eat. The two most important lines with carbohydrate counting are the serving size and the total carbohydrate amount.

    • Look at the serving size. All the information on the label is about this serving of food. If you will be eating a larger serving, then you will need to double or triple the information on the label.
    • Look at the grams of total carbohydrate.
      • Total carbohydrate on the label includes sugar, starch, and fiber.
      • Know the amount of carb you can eat, figure out the portion size to match.

    • If you are trying to lose weight, look at the calories. Comparing products can be helpful to find those lower in calories per serving.
    • To cut risk of heart disease and stroke, look at saturated and trans fats. Look for products with the lowest amount of saturated and trans fats per serving.
    • For people with high blood pressure, look at the sodium. Look for foods with less sodium.




    However, as helpful as this is, please still feel free to post your recipes.
    Free Charmed.

  11. #26
    Elite Member DeadDwarf's Avatar
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    ^ great resources there to help you!

    Carb counting for me was hard at first, but once you start reading labels and calculating carbs in your go to meals, it becomes really easy. I eat about 15-20 carbs for breakfast and 15-30 carbs for my snacks (3-4 snacks a day), lunch and dinner are 40-60 grams of carbs each, but I tend to eat towards the higher end of my carbs for those meals, especially dinner since your body may raise your blood sugar if you don't have enough carbs (important while you sleep too because of the "dawn effect"). Don't miss snacks and if your husband goes to bed more than 3 hours after dinner he should probably have a little snack to help him at night.

    I like carb counting because it's pretty easy to calculate what foods or portions will be too much for your blood sugar levels. It's helpful to buy a scale to measure portions or at least until you get the hang of it. Protein/fat is important because it helps slow down the carbs in your blood, so I try to eat peanuts, peanut butter, string cheese or other cheeses, etc when I have a carb/sugar snack like pretzels, apples, crackers, etc. It's really about finding the right balance between your foods, before you know it you will be an expert at what foods should go with what. I only have to do this for another few weeks, but it has taught me how to eat the "correct" way so my family eats like this now and will continue once the baby is born too.

    oh and I have read from others that cinnamon may help lower BS, I think like 1 gram a day. People put it cottage cheese, cereal, milk, etc. i tried it and didnt see a difference, but maybe it's worth a try to others...

  12. #27
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    We have made some "small" changes (IMO!) and MrN says that he is already less thirsty.
    We have swapped bread for wraps & I got some Kosher crackers that are low in carbs/sugar; we have diet soda (and lucazade is on a blacklist, as I stated some time ago!!!! I HATE that stuff!); I also purchased some WW cordial.
    Just being aware of what we need to do is helping.

    DD- I've been on a diet for forever, so I used to counting something (calories, points, sins, etc...) so it's not too bad.
    Thanks for the note about the "dawn" effect, that's useful.
    we have been told not to eat too much cheese though (due to the fat content?) and avoid salt.

    Thanks for all the help.
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  13. #28
    Elite Member Moongirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waterslide View Post
    *I don't know why this thread hates me. I've tried to post this 3 times and now I've forgotten what I typed. Gah! So.....

    @ Novice - No I'm not diabetic, but I have close friends and family who are, plus I've been reading a lot about unnecessary sugars lately. My good cholesterol is on the low side, so I've been cutting back on sugars, bread, pasta, rice, etc., just as a precaution. It's nothing too serious as far as I know.

    It was easier for me to cut out bread, pasta and rice, so I allow myself potatoes. It's obviously not from a medical, scientific or nutritional standpoint, but I figure they grow in the ground and they're OK in moderation for me. I figure they're not as bad as eating a bread or pasta.

    I'm a little confused about soda though. My doctor says regular soda (either with cane sugar or the dread HFCS) is evil, and to drink diet soda. My other doctor says don't ever drink diet soda because your body doesn't know how to break down the artificial sugar and it turns to fat and that even HFCS isn't as evil as that. Soda is the one almost daily vice I can't quite shake for some reason. I swear it's not the sugar I'm addicted to, it's the carbonation. The rest of my day I usually drink unsweetened tea and water.

    I got the Sugar Rut book from my mom and they have a lot of potato recipes which clearly is not going to help. Mostly they're substituting honey and vinegars for sugar as far as I can tell so far.
    Quote Originally Posted by Novice View Post
    So the sugar book is about not using refined sugars, rather than a book for diabetics?

    Regarding the carbonated - get carbonated water or soda water it's free of sugars & calories & so much better for you.

    I had an email from my work friend today & that was very helpful, however, if anyone has any favourDite recipes pls feel free to post them.

    A nutritionist I used to work with suggested using carbonated water like Schweppes, and adding Crystal Light to it (personally, I like the Wal Mart brand of "crystal light" type of powder). Just pour the powder into the bottle, and you have a sugar free flavored "soda". Just be careful and re-cap the bottle quickly, it tends to bubble over when you pour the powder in.

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    I bought a book called "Blood Sugar" for my dad.
    Blood Sugar: Inspiring Recipes for Anyone Facing the Challenge of Diabetes and Maintaining Good Health : Hardback : Michael Moore : 9781742571546

    It covers soups, entrees, desert, condiments and mains. I mainly bought it because I was sick of my dad complaining about food all the time. He was bored and needed inspiration. I don't know if he is just being nice but he seems happy with the book.
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    A*O
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    Late to the party but in my experience the received wisdom from a lot of so called diabetes "experts" is outdated and bollox. Yes, avoid refined sugar but the real enemy is carbohydrates especially the Gang Of Four - Bread, Rice, Pasta, Potato. An Atkins-type diet actually works pretty well but each diabetic reacts differently to different carbs so test yourself with a blood glucose meter 2 hours after eating to see what makes you spike. It may be some carbs, it may be all. I spike with bread (dammit!) but can tolerate a small amount of basmati rice. Read "The Diabetes Diet" by Dr Richard Bernstein, a Type 1 diabetic who needs minimal insulin via his zero carb diet. It's pretty hard core but it works. Type 2 diabetes is somewhat different and can be controlled with certain medication, diet and exercise. Insulin is usually a last resort but I know T2s who prefer using insulin so they can eat a more "normal" diet. It's a personal choice. I manage very well avoiding carbs and taking a couple of tablets every day but diabetes is a progressive disease so I may eventually need stronger medication or insulin. I just eat, test, eat, test and so far so good.

    Another really and I mean REALLY excellent resource is the Diabetes Daily website, especially the forum. It's a fabulous source of useful and relevant info, support, discussion and has everything you need to know. The forum is welcoming and helpful (no cunty bitches) and as a newly diagnosed diabetic I found it indispensable when I was pretty clueless about it all.

    Edit: Also, fruit isn't great either (all that fructose) especially tropical fruits like mango, pineapple, etc. But again, eat and test, eat and test and see what you can tolerate. In fact test after everything you eat and you'll quickly figure out what to avoid.
    Last edited by A*O; December 31st, 2012 at 02:40 AM.
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