Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Traditional French baker's croissants

  1. #1
    Bronze Member supermat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toulouse, France, Europe
    Posts
    53

    Default Traditional French baker's croissants

    Ingrédients pour 18 à 20 croissants :
    • 17.5 ounces flower
    • 2 teaspoons of salt
    • 1.4 Ounces baker’s Yeast
    • 7 ounces real butter
    • 2.1 ounces sugar
    • 1 egg for the coloration + 1 pinch salt
    • 11.2 ounces room temperature milk
    • I am trying to translate grams into ounces and °C into °F, so if you don’t understand and that you prefer grams, just let me know… lol
    Etape 1
    • In a bowl, pour the flower. Dig a hole in it. Inside the hole, put the suger, the salt, the milk and the yeat that you have previously mixed with a little milk.
    • Stir until you obtain a homogeneous dough, and keep stirring until it does not stick to the bowl anymore
    • Cover the bowl with a wet dishtowel and place in the fridge for about 30 min. After those 30 minutes are gone, stir again the dough (for the air to be renewed because of the fermenting of the yeat) and place back the dough in the fridge for an hour.
    Etape 2
    • Wrap the butter into a cooking paper then roll it till it is about 0.2 inches thick and has a square shape. Remove the paper ( !)
    • Ge tht dough from the fridge. Flower your work station and roll over the dough until it is about 0.4 inches thick.
    • Place the butter at the center of the dough and fold the borders of the dough towards the center.
    Etape 3
    • Spread the dough in large rectangle about 0.2 inches thick
    • Fold into 3 and give ¼ turn to the dough (I know it sounds weird…)
    • Let rest 20 mins in the fridge
    Etape 4
    • Repeat etape 3 twice again and befoire you spread again the dough, check that the fold is located at your right.
    • Roll the dough over until it is about 0.15 inches thick and 12.6 inches wide
    • Cut the dough into 2 in order to obtain two bands of approx 6.3 inches
    • In each band, cut triangles havinf a base of approx 4.7 inches
    Etape 5
    • At the middle of the base of each triangle operate a little incision(0.4 – 0.8 inches)
    • Starting with the base of the triangle roll it up towards the summit of the triangle (if you’re real griddy, you can certainly add a chocolate bar along the base of the traiangle pripor to roll up)
    • Place the croissants on a baking tray covered with cooking paper and let rest 1 hour (they should double volume)
    • Pre-heat the oven 464°F
    • Put some liquid egg on the croissants, place them in the oven and let cook for 15 to 18 min.
    Have a nice breakfast!!
    C'est en potant qu'on devient potiron

  2. #2
    Silver Member Biatch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Hell's Kitchen
    Posts
    599

    Default

    Oh,merci, supermat!!
    J'irai faire des croissants aujourd'hui mais je peut attender pour demain matin
    (J'espere que vous n'est considerez pas que je critique..Pour ETAPE les mot est STEP.La premiere ligne , Ingredients pour 18-20 croissants est, en Anglais, Ingredients for 18-20 croissants.Je veux seulement vous aider avec la langue.C'est ok?Le rest, c'est parfait....et je vous en prie, est-ce que vous pouves laisser les numeros dans grammes meme que ounces?Car je suis europeean, j'en sais pas les ounces.)MERCI et merci!!


    OK, what about a creme brulee recipe or a cocq-au-vin, today or tomorrow???
    Or maybe some ideas for Christmas diner?
    Like some aperitifs, your favourite duck/turkey/pheasant dish??

    I miss foie gras, in UK is harder to find , I have to go to certain shops to get some, thank God for delicatesse shops!

    Merci en avant garde.
    ----------------------

    Respect is given when respect is deserved.

  3. #3
    Bronze Member supermat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toulouse, France, Europe
    Posts
    53

    Default

    All right,

    Here are the proportions in european measurements:
    • 500 g flower
    • 2 teaspoons salt
    • 40 g baker's yeat
    • 200 g butter
    • 60 g sugar
    • 1 egg and 1 pinch salt
    • 300 à 320 g room temperature milk.
    J'espère que ça t'aidera.

    And for the crème brûlée, will you post the receipe, or do you want mine?
    C'est en potant qu'on devient potiron

  4. #4
    Silver Member Biatch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Hell's Kitchen
    Posts
    599

    Default

    MERCI!!
    Non, je veux unne que est mieux!
    La mienne c'est toujours ..degonflee(?) ...DEFLATED!I hate having bad creme!!

    Ah, comment est-ce que je peux prepare le veaux...LA VIANDE pour les frincandeaux?
    Mon charcutier est impossible- il ne vende jamais de bon veaux!

    The veal he is selling is allways full of gristle (croquant?).
    ----------------------

    Respect is given when respect is deserved.

  5. #5
    Bronze Member supermat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toulouse, France, Europe
    Posts
    53

    Default

    Allright, I will try to give you my receipe.

    Concerning veal, I will check. I actually don't knopw how to prepare the fricandeaux... This is e french dish indeed!!

    Gristle for meat is in french nerfs which you would litterally translate by nerves.
    C'est en potant qu'on devient potiron

  6. #6
    Silver Member Biatch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Hell's Kitchen
    Posts
    599

    Default

    Merci, again.
    As I said, i forgot some words due to not using the french a lot in the last 6 years.LOL at me...I forgot nerfs...was so easy...and I said croquant, which is rather crunchy like the crust from croissant .

    Ok, I'm going back to cooking (for real) some pasta...my baby boy loves pasta alla arrabiatta or alla marinara- eh, the italian blood, and then some creme- ah ,the french blood.
    I ask so many recipes because, up until we moved, we used to go a lot to restaurants.Before I got married, I also ate at restaurants for most of last 10 years...so I forgot many recipes...or I cook something from memory and just can't get it right! And my mom sends me recipes and I lose them!
    I am sooo happy you joined here!!!
    ----------------------

    Respect is given when respect is deserved.

  7. #7
    Elite Member Bellatheball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    17,107

    Default

    I'll print and read this later. I've tried it Julia Child's way and Jacques Torres' way. Both were fantastic but it was just hard to get the dough so thin. I'll give this one a whirl. Thanks!

  8. #8
    A*O
    A*O is offline
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! A*O's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Being Paula
    Posts
    30,300

    Default

    Well, mes copines, we have a genuine French boulangerie/patisserie in my local shopping centre here in beautiful downdown Melbourne, Australia with the most fantastic and authentic French croissants I have ever tasted outside France so thanks for the recipe cherie but I'm happy to buy them from the experts!
    I've never liked lesbianism - it leaves a bad taste in my mouth
    Dame Edna Everage

    Just because you're offended doesn't mean you're right.

  9. #9
    Bronze Member supermat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toulouse, France, Europe
    Posts
    53

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by A*O View Post
    Well, mes copines, we have a genuine French boulangerie/patisserie in my local shopping centre here in beautiful downdown Melbourne, Australia with the most fantastic and authentic French croissants I have ever tasted outside France so thanks for the recipe cherie but I'm happy to buy them from the experts!

    Hey,

    You're pretty right to get it from professionnals!! I actually very rarely prepare them. It is so easy togo down the road and buy them... But a croissant has never tasted as good as in France... (it is probably the only case where I will state that... For the rest, it is OK, but I muist say that croissants are very difficult to imitate...)

    And by the way, you can call me cherie, but without the e as I am a guy...

    Not that I dislike being a girl, but the fact is here (huh, let me check...OK.) I am a man...
    C'est en potant qu'on devient potiron

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 36
    Last Post: August 10th, 2006, 10:34 PM
  2. Replies: 12
    Last Post: July 26th, 2006, 02:46 PM
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: April 13th, 2006, 04:38 PM
  4. French Joke
    By Tiara in forum Laughs and Oddities
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: January 10th, 2006, 04:02 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •