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Thread: Brexitpocalypse: CocksuckerBoJo’s Reign of Terror

  1. #46
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    Freedom!
    I'm open to everything. When you start to criticise the times you live in, your time is over. - Karl Lagerfeld

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    Quote Originally Posted by twitchy2.0 View Post
    But you can accept bleach-soaked poultry from the US. Woo hoo!
    If the ******** USA had a salmonella surveliance protocol we wouldn't need to........



    (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-47440562)
    twitchy2.0 and Kittylady like this.

  3. #48
    Elite Member kasippu's Avatar
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    Quite a lot of mine friends are so worried for the most random stuff
    One couple She (Brit) married to a German -he lives in Asia for UN- She and her kids live in UK, They have a mortgage in her husbands name and this could be a huge issue as she doesn't work so they cannot transfer the loan to her name. So nothing in their marital or financial situation will have changed and yet maybe they can't keep the house.
    Another is divorced, husband works in Paris and the kids go every other weekend with the Eurostar. Will they need a visa?
    Another her dog has a disease and the vet said this might be a medicine that will no longer be available.

    We are currently looking at Universities for my son, and all the British ones that come to visit, first question always, what about Brexit , they have no idea what will happen.
    I preferred EU to US (mostly because of their gun laws, they freak me out)
    C_is_for_Cookie likes this.

  4. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by kasippu View Post
    Quite a lot of mine friends are so worried for the most random stuff
    One couple She (Brit) married to a German -he lives in Asia for UN- She and her kids live in UK, They have a mortgage in her husbands name and this could be a huge issue as she doesn't work so they cannot transfer the loan to her name. So nothing in their marital or financial situation will have changed and yet maybe they can't keep the house.
    Another is divorced, husband works in Paris and the kids go every other weekend with the Eurostar. Will they need a visa?
    Another her dog has a disease and the vet said this might be a medicine that will no longer be available.

    We are currently looking at Universities for my son, and all the British ones that come to visit, first question always, what about Brexit , they have no idea what will happen.
    I preferred EU to US (mostly because of their gun laws, they freak me out)
    Exactly!


    And I have just found a great dentist who has been here 15 years but is Polish - haven’t even asked if he’s staying....

  5. #50
    Elite Member OrangeSlice's Avatar
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    After the last few years, do you think a lot of the people that voted leave have changed their mind to stay?
    Kittylady and Novice like this.
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  6. #51
    Elite Member kasippu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeSlice View Post
    After the last few years, do you think a lot of the people that voted leave have changed their mind to stay?
    I saw one idiot on tv who has a flower business and basically will go bankrupt (because even if he gets flowers they will be dead before they arrive) who voted Brexit, said he had no idea what he voted for and then they asked if he had changed his mind and he said NO.
    I was like WHAT????
    sputnik and C_is_for_Cookie like this.

  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeSlice View Post
    After the last few years, do you think a lot of the people that voted leave have changed their mind to stay?
    It was portrayed as the lowest common denominator- immigration.
    I think that some would (who actually voted for Brexit) and some who were just voting against 10 years of cuts & poverty would vote differently.





    From the Financial Times (mainly establishment, but with the financial outcomes as their analysis)

    Mr Johnson had little choice. He has lost his majority and lost control of the Brexit process. The proposed legislation blocking no deal left him unable to negotiate with the EU. An election was the only way forward. This was perhaps predictable. What few could have foreseen is the scale of Tory blood-letting. In just a few short weeks Mr Johnson has also orchestrated the biggest rupture in the Conservative party for decades, sending it into that election having expelled 21 of his own MPs. The Conservatives are being shorn of all who are not prepared to sign up to Mr Johnson’s world view. They will go into the election telling voters there is no longer room in the party for Kenneth Clarke, Rory Stewart, Nicholas Soames and nearly 20 others. The upshot is that some of the criticisms the Tories planned to aim at Mr Corbyn can now be turned back on the prime minister. Moderates — many of whom voted for Theresa May’s Brexit deal — are being purged. The party has been taken over by its right wing. For opponents of Brexit, the Conservatives are now threatening the stability of the British economy. Brexit: is a snap election part of Boris Johnson's strategy? Many believe that Mr Johnson has intentionally engineered this contest setting up a “people versus parliament election”. Later on Wednesday, his chancellor, Sajid Javid, will announce spending commitments on police, schools and hospitals which now are merely election promises rather than firm commitments. More likely is that Mr Johnson hoped to avoid a poll before Brexit while recognising that it was a likely consequence once it became clear that he really was ready to accept a no-deal outcome. He calculated that failure to deliver Brexit on schedule would be catastrophic for his party and was not prepared to waver from his position. But this strategy is incredibly risky. Though the party will fight the election with unity of purpose, it still looks divided. It has lost Ruth Davidson, the hugely popular leader of the Scottish Conservatives. Many of the 13 seats she helped to win in 2017 are at serious risk. In the south and south-west, Mr Johnson faces losing Tory seats in Remain strongholds, especially to the Liberal Democrats. This means he will need to win up to 40 or 50 seats elsewhere, especially in northern Labour seats that voted Leave. He will hope that the Lib Dems split the anti-Tory vote by taking Remain votes and the votes of those who oppose Brexit but cannot support Mr Corbyn. The Labour leader meanwhile will seek to focus on other issues: austerity, social justice and the environment. By offering a referendum he will seek to keep Remainers on board but he will not want the contest to be all about Brexit. Mr Johnson will also need to crush Nigel Farage’s Brexit party if it insists on standing against him. The path to success is discernible and Mr Johnson is certainly a formidable campaigner, but it is an extraordinary political gamble. If he does win, he will emerge not only hugely empowered, but will also have five years’ grace to get the UK through the inevitable early crises of Brexit. He would have the mandate to seek a different deal, though that would mean delay. He will also have refashioned the Conservative party since its support base will be shorn of a major chunk of well-heeled metropolitan southern liberals. Instead it will be more reliant on a nationalist and working-class northern base not overly keen on spending cuts and lower taxes for the wealthy. Recommended Brexit How MPs voted to seize control of the Brexit agenda Mr Johnson may still consider himself a one-nation Tory but he has engineered a radical right takeover of his party. The consequences go beyond Brexit. While his allies at the top might see themselves as free-marketeers, the Tories will have more than a touch of Trump about them.

  8. #53
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Boris Johnson gave a shit speech, lost his majority live on TV, lost the vote, and now he's off to fire his hero's grandson. A master tactician.
    10:25 PM · Sep 3, 2019·Twitter Web App





















    Just heard on Newsnight that he's the first PM to lose his first commons vote sins 1894. Truly we are in the presence of a Machiavellian genius.
    10:44 PM · Sep 3, 2019·


    @jamesmfelton


    https://mobile.twitter.com/JimMFelto...03132115927040








    @james






































  9. #54
    Elite Member Sarzy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeSlice View Post
    After the last few years, do you think a lot of the people that voted leave have changed their mind to stay?
    I think lots would. I know people that would vote differently if we had another vote. Hardly anyone had a damn clue what they were voting for, it was ridiculous.
    Last edited by Sarzy; September 4th, 2019 at 11:36 AM.

  10. #55
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kasippu View Post
    I saw one idiot on tv who has a flower business and basically will go bankrupt (because even if he gets flowers they will be dead before they arrive) who voted Brexit, said he had no idea what he voted for and then they asked if he had changed his mind and he said NO.
    I was like WHAT????
    this is basically every trump voter ever.
    czb, Sarzy, Kittylady and 5 others like this.
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  11. #56
    Elite Member Kittylady's Avatar
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    Bloke is ashamed to admit that while we voted Remain, his dear old mum voted leave. She now regrets it and wishes she had better understood the situation and consequences.
    Novice and C_is_for_Cookie like this.
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  12. #57
    Elite Member OrangeSlice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novice View Post
    It was portrayed as the lowest common denominator- immigration.
    I think that some would (who actually voted for Brexit) and some who were just voting against 10 years of cuts & poverty would vote differently.





    From the Financial Times (mainly establishment, but with the financial outcomes as their analysis)

    Mr Johnson had little choice. He has lost his majority and lost control of the Brexit process. The proposed legislation blocking no deal left him unable to negotiate with the EU. An election was the only way forward. This was perhaps predictable. What few could have foreseen is the scale of Tory blood-letting. In just a few short weeks Mr Johnson has also orchestrated the biggest rupture in the Conservative party for decades, sending it into that election having expelled 21 of his own MPs. The Conservatives are being shorn of all who are not prepared to sign up to Mr Johnson’s world view. They will go into the election telling voters there is no longer room in the party for Kenneth Clarke, Rory Stewart, Nicholas Soames and nearly 20 others. The upshot is that some of the criticisms the Tories planned to aim at Mr Corbyn can now be turned back on the prime minister. Moderates — many of whom voted for Theresa May’s Brexit deal — are being purged. The party has been taken over by its right wing. For opponents of Brexit, the Conservatives are now threatening the stability of the British economy. Brexit: is a snap election part of Boris Johnson's strategy? Many believe that Mr Johnson has intentionally engineered this contest setting up a “people versus parliament election”. Later on Wednesday, his chancellor, Sajid Javid, will announce spending commitments on police, schools and hospitals which now are merely election promises rather than firm commitments. More likely is that Mr Johnson hoped to avoid a poll before Brexit while recognising that it was a likely consequence once it became clear that he really was ready to accept a no-deal outcome. He calculated that failure to deliver Brexit on schedule would be catastrophic for his party and was not prepared to waver from his position. But this strategy is incredibly risky. Though the party will fight the election with unity of purpose, it still looks divided. It has lost Ruth Davidson, the hugely popular leader of the Scottish Conservatives. Many of the 13 seats she helped to win in 2017 are at serious risk. In the south and south-west, Mr Johnson faces losing Tory seats in Remain strongholds, especially to the Liberal Democrats. This means he will need to win up to 40 or 50 seats elsewhere, especially in northern Labour seats that voted Leave. He will hope that the Lib Dems split the anti-Tory vote by taking Remain votes and the votes of those who oppose Brexit but cannot support Mr Corbyn. The Labour leader meanwhile will seek to focus on other issues: austerity, social justice and the environment. By offering a referendum he will seek to keep Remainers on board but he will not want the contest to be all about Brexit. Mr Johnson will also need to crush Nigel Farage’s Brexit party if it insists on standing against him. The path to success is discernible and Mr Johnson is certainly a formidable campaigner, but it is an extraordinary political gamble. If he does win, he will emerge not only hugely empowered, but will also have five years’ grace to get the UK through the inevitable early crises of Brexit. He would have the mandate to seek a different deal, though that would mean delay. He will also have refashioned the Conservative party since its support base will be shorn of a major chunk of well-heeled metropolitan southern liberals. Instead it will be more reliant on a nationalist and working-class northern base not overly keen on spending cuts and lower taxes for the wealthy. Recommended Brexit How MPs voted to seize control of the Brexit agenda Mr Johnson may still consider himself a one-nation Tory but he has engineered a radical right takeover of his party. The consequences go beyond Brexit. While his allies at the top might see themselves as free-marketeers, the Tories will have more than a touch of Trump about them.

    Can someone explain the purpose (and pros/cons) of a snap election here and what today's vote actually means? I couldn't follow everything in the article and am not as well-versed in the workings of British politics as I would like to be.
    "Schadenfreude, hard to spell, easy to feel." ~VenusinFauxFurs

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  13. #58
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    [quote] Originally Posted by sputnik

    this is basically every trump voter ever.]/quote]

    and every remainer
    Originally Posted by Kittylady
    Bloke is ashamed to admit that while we voted Remain, his dear old mum voted leave. She now regrets it and wishes she had better understood the situation and consequences.



    Yep I think that a lot of remainer believed the lies that the Brexiteers said - like £509735697635056456245645 for the NHS.
    Originally Posted by OrangeSlice
    Can someone explain the purpose (and pros/cons) of a snap election here and what today's vote actually means? I couldn't follow everything in the article and am not as well-versed in the workings of British politics as I would like to be.



    Basically it would stop any of our Govt making him/BJ actually try to get a "deal" from the EU.
    Interesting fact, despite all the bollos they are spouting no requests or proposals for deals have actually be presented to the EU to discuss or ratify.






    Boris Johnson's call for general election rejected by MPs


    • 9 minutes ago



    Related Topics





    Boris Johnson calls for October election Boris Johnson has faced a double defeat in the Commons after MPs turned down his motion for a general election.
    Earlier, MPs backed a bill aimed at blocking a no-deal Brexit if the PM hadn't agreed a plan with the EU ahead of the 31 October deadline.
    Mr Johnson said the bill "scuppered" negotiations and the only way forward now was an election.
    But Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn accused the PM of "playing a disingenuous game" to force a no-deal Brexit.
    He said his party would back an election after the bill had been passed, but not before.
    Both the SNP and the Liberal Democrats also criticised the prime minister's motion as a plot to make sure the UK left the EU without a deal.
    But supporters of Mr Johnson hit back at opposition members who had been calling for a general election for two years.
    Kittylady likes this.

  14. #59
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    Jo Johnson profile: Boris's 'brilliant' brother who put his belief in the 'national interest' before family loyalty


    share


    Jo Johnson said he had been 'torn between family loyalty and the national interest'




    • Danielle Sheridan


    5 SEPTEMBER 2019 • 1:13 PMIt was November last year when Jo Johnson decided he had had enough. The Remainer younger brother of Boris Johnson, who resigned while transport minister under Theresa May, accused her of offering MPs a choice between “vassalage and chaos”, as he warned a no-deal exit would "inflict untold damage on our nation".

    "The choice being presented to the British people is no choice at all," he wrote in November last year.

    "The first option is the one the Government is proposing: an agreement that will leave our country economically weakened, with no say in the EU rules it must follow and years of uncertainty for business.
    "The second option is a 'no deal' Brexit that I know as a Transport Minister will inflict untold damage on our nation."
    He added that the two "deeply unattractive outcomes, vassalage and chaos" on offer were "a failure of British statecraft on a scale unseen since the Suez crisis".
    The Johnson family: the Prime Minister, centre, with his father Stanley, sister Rachel and brother Jo CREDIT: ANDREW PARSONS


    His views were in stark contrast to that of his brother, the Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, an ardent Brexiteer and proponent of no-deal.
    'Radically different views of the world'

    Jo Johnson began his career in politics in 2010 and, unlike his headline-attracting brother, rose quietly.
    [CENTER]

  15. #60
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    oooh i was about to post about boris johnson's brother quitting as MP and minister.
    it's too bad actually, i wish he'd stayed on and vocally opposed his shitstain of a brother.
    Novice, Kittylady, Sarzy and 1 others like this.
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