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Thread: Zimbabwe’s Most Famous Lion Is Now a Hunting Trophy

  1. #61
    Elite Member Sarzy's Avatar
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    I hate these fuckers who hunt animals. These trophy killings are disgusting.

  2. #62
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    Default Betty White blasts dentist who killed Cecil the lion

    Betty White blasts dentist who killed Cecil the lion

    Betty White blasts dentist who killed Cecil the lion

    New York Daily News
    Jacqueline Cutler 16 hrs ago

    Betty White is America’s sweetheart grandma, but mess with animals and she becomes a ninja.

    A longtime activist for animals, White, 93, is among those furious over the Minnesota dentist killing Cecil the lion in Zimbabwe.

    “You don’t want to hear some of the things I want to do to that man,” she told The Associated Press.

    “It’s such a heartbreaker,” she continued. “You can’t even talk about it, and to see this king of the jungle and personifying it in every way, this gorgeous creature. How can somebody do that?”

    The world is asking the same question.

    American dentist Walter James Palmer hit Cecil with a bow and arrow after luring him out of a national park, where the animal was protected.

    Palmer is reported to have then tracked the injured beast for 40 hours before finally fatally shooting Cecil.

    Zimbabwe officials have announced their intention to seek Palmer’s extradition.

    “Unfortunately it was too late to apprehend the foreign poacher as he had already absconded to his country of origin,” Oppah Muchinguri, Zimbabwe’s environment, water and climate minister, told a news conference.

    “We are appealing to the responsible authorities for his extradition to Zimbabwe so that he be made accountable.”

    Palmer might do better in the African court than he would do at the hands of White.

    Over the years, White has volunteered her time with the American Humane Association and has been president of the Morris Animal Foundation, which works to helps animals enjoy longer, healthier lives.


    ....

    U.S. authorities launch investigation into Cecil the lion’s killer Walter Palmer

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/nati...309023?cid=msn

    BY Cameron Joseph , Larry Mcshane
    NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
    Published: Thursday, July 30, 2015, 8:09 AM
    Updated: Thursday, July 30, 2015, 11:58 PM


    (FaceBook) Walter Palmer, 55, has become America’s most hated hunter.

    The world's most wanted hunter won’t collect his ill-gotten trophy — and may face extradition to Zimbabwe for his cruel killing of a black-maned lion.

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service jumped into the probe of missing Minnesota dentist Walter Palmer, promising Thursday to “assist Zimbabwe officials in whatever manner requested.”

    The agency called on Palmer to “contact us immediately” as a report surfaced that the bow-and-arrow hunter asked to kill a large elephant just after the slaying of the 13-year-old lion named Cecil.

    Walter Palmer, 55, has become America’s most hated hunter.

    “I told him I would not be able to find one so big, so the client left the next day,” Zimbabwe guide Theo Bronkhorst told The Telegraph newspaper.

    The married dad of two became an instant global pariah after the sham safari that left the beloved beast dead — although at least one Zimbabwe official wasn’t too concerned.

    “What lion?” wondered Acting Information Minister Prisca Mupfumira when asked about the killing.

    Cecil, killed after he was lured off protected national parkland, was intended to follow Palmer back home via airplane once a taxidermist stuffed the king of the jungle.

    But one of Palmer’s guides instead surrendered Cecil’s head and other remains over to authorities in Zimbabwe — where the lion was likely to stay.

    Palmer, 55, remained in hiding Thursday as investigators on two continents considered their options. He has blamed the hunt on local guides who were paid $50,000 to help him bag a lion.

    Bronkhorst is already charged in the July 1 killing of Cecil, who wore a tracking collar as part of a research study.

    While the U.S. and Zimbabwe have an extradition treaty, a State Department official said she would not comment on any request for Palmer, “as a matter of policy.”

    “We were saddened to learn of the death of Cecil the lion,” said spokeswoman Julia Straker. “Privacy considerations prevent us from commenting further on the status of the U.S. citizen allegedly involved.”

    Palmer’s extradition is possible if his actions in Zimbabwe are considered punishable under the laws of both countries, according to the treaty submitted in 1997 under President Bill Clinton.

    Rep. Betty McCollum (D-Minn.) suggested officials investigate whether U.S. laws were violated related to conspiracy, the bribing of foreign officials or illegally hunting a protected animal.

    “To bait and kill a threatened animal, like this African lion, for sport cannot be called hunting, but rather a disgraceful display of callous cruelty,” McCollum said in a statement.

    The chorus of voices condemning Palmer grew Thursday to include former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich, actress Betty White and Spice Girl Geri (Ginger Spice) Halliwell.



    (FaceBook) Former Spice Girl Geri Halliwell mourned the lion she met 'many years ago' on Twitter Wednesday with a picture of her holding and kissing Cecil as a cub.
    Last edited by *Wookie-Chick*; August 1st, 2015 at 08:08 AM. Reason: Adding another article.

  3. #63
    Gold Member I'mNotBitter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by twitchy2.0 View Post
    What, he hunts dogs too? (no idea what the tattoo means)
    Sorry, that's an Elite Hunting tattoo from the movie Hostel
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  4. #64
    Super Moderator twitchy2.0's Avatar
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    ah, thanks.
    "If you are not outraged, then you are not paying attention," Heather Heyer's facebook quote.

  5. #65
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    You just gotta hate how that whole industry works. Lions are bred on lion farms for various purposes. As cubs they are separated from their mothers when they are just days old. Special "care farms" are set up to which, often young and idealistic, people are lured as tourists to help care for the cubs and bottle feed them, take pictures with them, cuddle with them etc. When the cubs become too big to be cuddled, people can pay money to go on walks with the larger young, up until the age of 2, under supervision of guides and professional carers. All against pay.
    Then the adult animals end up in parks where rich tourists can go "hunt" them. These hunts can take days. What tourists don't know is that beforehand the exact location for the fatal shoot is already set as the animals are fed at the same time in the same spots. Tourists think they are tracking the lions when in fact they are led to the assigned spot where they end up shooting and killing the animals. Other adult animals are killed and shipped off for the Asian pharmaceutical market.
    It's an industry and ironically a portion of the money that is made in these horrible ways goes to the protected wildlife parks and sanctuaries.
    Warren Beatty: actor, director, writer, producer.

    ***** celeb

  6. #66
    Elite Member Bellatheball's Avatar
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    ^ If all true. that is heartbreaking and disgusting.

  7. #67
    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
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    Source CNN


    Cecil the lion's brother, Jericho, is also illegally killed in Zimbabwe, official says

    The brother of slain Cecil the lion, named Jericho, was killed Saturday in Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe, a senior park official told CNN.

    Jericho was gunned down by a hunter operating illegally, said Johnny Rodrigues, head of the Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force.

    Cecil was also killed illegally, provoking an international outrage because he was a protected animal, and Zimbabwe is seeking the extradition of American dentist Walter Palmer on accusations that he and others illegally hunted the lion, authorities said.

    "It is with huge disgust and sadness that we have just been informed that Jericho, Cecil's brother has been killed at 4pm today," Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force said Saturday on Facebook.

    "We are absolutely heart broken," the Task Force added.

    Jericho was considered to be caring for and defending Cecil's cubs, but the survivability of those cubs wasn't immediately clear in the aftermath of Jericho's death.

    Some of the cubs may have been Jericho's, said David Macdonald, director of Oxford's Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, who has been studying Cecil.

    Male coalitions, often between brothers, oversee prides of females in lion society and protect the prides from threats posed by outsider male lions, the scientist said.

    Warren Beatty: actor, director, writer, producer.

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  8. #68
    Elite Member mtlebay's Avatar
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    Again!? How could this have happened again??
    Go Habs Go!!

  9. #69
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    Jericho, another weak male who co-headed the pride with Cecil, was illegally killed today by a hunter. There are no words:

    (CNN)Jericho, the brother of slain Cecil the lion, was killed Saturday in Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe, a senior park official told CNN.

    Jericho was gunned down by a hunter operating illegally, said Johnny Rodrigues, head of the Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force.
    Cecil's death provoked an international outrage because he was a protected animal, and Zimbabwe is seeking the extradition of American dentist Walter Palmer on accusations that he and others illegally hunted the lion, authorities said.
    "It is with huge disgust and sadness that we have just been informed that Jericho, Cecil's brother has been killed at 4pm today," the Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force said Saturday on Facebook.
    "We are absolutely heart broken," the Task Force said.
    Jericho was considered to be caring for and defending Cecil's cubs, but the survivability of those cubs wasn't immediately clear in the aftermath of Jericho's death.
    Some of the cubs may have been Jericho's, said David Macdonald, director of Oxford's Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, who has been studying Cecil.
    Male coalitions, often between brothers, oversee prides of females in lion society and protect the prides from threats posed by outsider male lions, the scientist said.

    CNN appears to be retracting the story. Now they are saying he is "possibly" killed:

    (CNN)Conflicting reports emerged Saturday on whether Jericho, the brother of slain Cecil the lion, was also killed Saturday in an illegal hunt in Zimbabwe.

    Johnny Rodrigues, a senior park official and head of the Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force, told CNN that a hunter illegally gunned down Jericho in Hwange National Park.
    The task force also reported on its Facebook page that Jericho was killed at 4 p.m. local time.
    Later, however, an Oxford University researcher tracking Jericho told CNN that the lion was alive and moving as of 8 p.m. local time Saturday, based on the GPS data from the animal's collar.
    The GPS device didn't suggest that Jericho was killed or that anything was out of ordinary, said Brent Stapelkamp, a field researcher who is part of a team tracking Jericho in Zimbabwe.
    Other government officials weren't immediately available for comment.


    At a minimum, the conflict over Jericho added to the angst in the wake of Cecil's killing, which provoked an international outrage because he was a protected animal. Zimbabwe is seeking the extradition of American dentist Walter Palmer on accusations that he and others illegally hunted the lion, authorities said.
    The Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force was emphatic on its Facebook page when it declared Jericho dead.
    "It is with huge disgust and sadness that we have just been informed that Jericho, Cecil's brother has been killed at 4pm today," the Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force said.
    "We are absolutely heart broken," the Task Force added on the Facebook posting.
    Jericho was considered to be caring for and defending Cecil's cubs, but the survivability of those cubs seemed imperiled if Jericho had indeed been killed.
    Some of the cubs may have been Jericho's, said David Macdonald, director of Oxford's Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, who has been studying Cecil.
    Male coalitions, often between brothers, oversee prides of females in lion society and protect them from threats posed by outsider male lions, the scientist said.
    But if Jericho were killed, the cubs' chance for survival "is probably gone," said Dave Salmoni, an apex predator expert for the Animal Planet.
    Jericho's death would seal "the fate of these cubs, for sure," Salmoni told CNN.
    Opinion: Can Zimbabwe have lion's killer extradited?
    CNN's Hamilton Wende and David McKenzie contributed to this report.
    Last edited by ADel; August 1st, 2015 at 04:13 PM.

  10. #70
    Elite Member Nevan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trixie View Post
    Yep, canned hunts make me sick, they're for rich pussies with small dicks. Here, even though they're doing deer culls in the towns and State parks due to "overpopulation" (i.e., the deer have entered suburbia and are eating people's precious tulips and hostas) the State still allows deer "farms" which basically breed genetically engineered giant bucks with giant antlers so rich fuckers can pay thousands of dollars to enter a fenced area and shoot a man made freak of nature. It's so disgusting. and it's all about the money, not "sport".
    I've talked about this before but I am from a culture/area that is heavily pro-hunting. I don't hunt myself, but I have numerous friends and family that do hunt. It's almost always white-tailed deer, which are waaaay overpopulated in my area. There is a rabbit season and a bird (quail, pheasant, turkey, etc.) season, but it is mostly white-tailed deer. And the people who hunt them around here are NOT hunting them because they're eating someone's tulips ... it's because there are SO many deer here that they cause numerous traffic accidents, a good portion of them are fatal. Try being on a mostly desolate highway late at night with wooded areas on both sides during rutting season. They just come out of nowhere and you have no choice but to plow into them.

    I don't know a single soul who hunts and doesn't eat or share everything they kill. Are we in a poor area that requires deer meat to supplement their diets? No. But to the people that eat it here, it's considered a game-y delicacy (there is a big difference in taste from supermarket meat and game meat) and *none* of the deer meat goes to waste, plus add in the fact that they're helping to control a massive overpopulation that has become a physical risk to your (and every one else's) life from MVAs. They're really not even financially benefitting from hunting, except being able to eat deer meat instead of meat from the supermarket (and even that is misleading because it costs big bucks to have a deer butchered -- I don't know anyone that butchers their own deer), and have to pay ever-increasing hunting permit fees for each and every season we have --- like muzzleloader season, bow season, shotgun season, doe day (does are only allowed to be hunted during one day), and on and on. There are numerous check points (usually attached to a butcher) where you by law have to bring in the dead deer to be weighed and ticked off your hunting license (you're only allowed so many kills per season).

    Quote Originally Posted by twitchy2.0 View Post
    We do get deer overpopulation – around here anyway – because the apex predators were hunted to extremely low numbers. We need more wolves.
    I totally agree with this statement. When humans decide to screw with the pecking order and cull entire populations of apex predators, it always shifts nature's balance and eventually will bite them in the ass one way or another. A prime example is the re-introduction of gray wolves in Yellowstone 20-30 years ago. And stupidly, the gray wolf has been taken off the endangered list recently in these areas, so people are AGAIN going to hunt them to extinction in those areas as they've done before eventually. Humans need to smarten up and learn from their own history. We are NOT the apex predator in every area of our planet, and we need to accept that. For instance, the ocean ... humans have NEVER been the apex predator in the ocean, yet we continually swim and dive there. And then get outraged or shocked when some type of shark attack occurs.

    Quote Originally Posted by A*O View Post
    Anyway.... Back in Murca, I think I know a dentist who might be struggling to find patients now. The Petards are demanding his execution by hanging. We can always rely on them to take a balanced, reasonable stance.
    I am not a fan of PETA or any other extremist group, but my favorite PETA story is this: Two PETA members came to NJ to join a protest for the hunting of overpopulated white-tail deer (which is ridiculous --- when you drive down any road or highway during rutting season, especially in Southern NJ where I live, both roads and highways alike are littered with deer carcasses from running out in front of a moving car by either being chased by a buck that they don't want to breed with, or the actual buck doing the chasing). They stayed afterward for either drinks and/or dinner with friends and colleagues into the dark of the night. While driving back home (I think they were from Pennsylvania or D.C., I can't remember exactly) and still in the state of NJ, they ran into a deer and totaled their vehicle (I don't think either of them were hurt, which they should thank their lucky stars for that alone). These two Mensa candidates then SUED the NJ Fish and Wildlife Department for not keeping the deer population under control. I'm sure you can imagine what happened when they got in front of a NJ judge with this bullshit.

    One of many sources: PeTA Activists Hit Deer While Driving, Sue New Jersey Fish And Wildlife Division

    --------

    I think if the U.S. outlaws the importation of ANY animal parts or bodies, the trophy hunting would lose a lot of luster and appeal to these kinds of people. They wouldn't have a head (or a majestic elephant's TAIL, WTF?) to mount on their wall. I also think, which I know is less realistic, if these third world countries outlawed non-residents' trophy hunting of basically cornered trophy animals and the companies that organize them, it would lead to a lot less animal deaths. I just don't get it --- don't these idiots see/think/realize that killing a powerful animal who is tied up or cornered isn't a sport? It's a travesty. I wonder if these fools tell their heartless friends who are admiring that dead cheetah's head hanging on their wall that they were only able to kill them with the animal's ability to run or attack taken away? I doubt it.
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  11. #71
    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bellatheball View Post
    ^ If all true. that is heartbreaking and disgusting.
    It is true, it has been going on for years if not decades. In South Africa alone there are hundreds of big game (especially lions) breeding farms especially for this purpose and the people who run it think people who object to it are hypocrites saying stuff like "They don't want to know that animals get killed before they end up on their dinner plate (!), they want to go to the supermarket and buy a package of neatly processed meat" as if people consume lions. They live in a parallel universe where money justifies everything.


    Bred for hunting: South Africa’s Lion Industry

    Bred for hunting: South Africa’s Lion Industry

    The hunting of the bred lions is not the only reason for complete rejection of this industry as being unethical from the point of view of animal protection. The road to suffering for the lions on the South African breeding farms begins shortly after their birth.

    Often the lion cubs are separated from their mothers only three days after their birth. This practice has fatal consequences, not including the mental suffering that these animals suffer: Due to the lack of milk provided by the mother, multiple deficiencies are displayed in the young animals. The cubs frequently suffer from bone deformations, breathing and digestive problems, thyroid problems, calcium deficiencies and many other illnesses, the results of which have a significant effect on the animals when they grow up.

    The keeping conditions for the young animals are also often completely unacceptable: Water, food and shade are hard to come by in many of the enclosures. In the most extreme cases, female cubs are shot shortly after their birth as they are rarely in demand for hunting.

    Petting is stress

    Even when they are only babies, the little lion cubs are abused as tourist attractions. Through their being raised by hand, they are imprint on humans. Everywhere in South Africa you can find the offers to pat a lion cub, take your photo with a lion cub or to go for a walk with a half grown lion. Unwitting tourists pay money to look at or touch young lion cubs, thereby supporting a horrific industry, an industry that even many hunting associations reject as being unethical. Most tourists to South Africa are unaware.

    This is pure stress for the motherless lion cubs: young animals have a great need for calm and so the constant contact to people and the bad keeping conditions lead to massive behavioural disturbances. Even their physical development is strongly affected. In addition, over and over again people are being attacked and injured by young lions.

    Lionesses as breeding machines

    The breeding lionesses are ready to conceive again very shortly after their young cubs are taken away from them and are then instantly mated again. Abused as “breeding machines”, continuously exposed to the traumatic experience of losing their young. Because they are giving birth much more often than they would be doing under natural conditions, after only a few years they become drained and weak. The cubs that are bred to these lionesses while they are in this condition also have bad constitutions.

    In the wild, lionesses usually give birth once every two years – on the breeding farms they have to give birth every six months. It is not rare for drained or small lionesses to end up being “special offers” for hunters or simply neglected and their bones harvested.

    Misinformation for tourists …

    In the wild, lionesses usually give birth once every two years – on the breeding farms they have to give birth every six months. It is not rare for drained or small lionesses to end up being “special offers” for hunters.

    The lion breeders falsely describe themselves as nature conservationists and claim to tourists that the animals are being bred to be later released into the wild. This is obvious a misinformation. Predators that are born in captivity, especially when they have been raised by hand, cannot be successfully released into the wild.

    … and volunteers

    Voluntary workers from Europe are often attracted to the breeding farms as volunteers, to help handraising the lions. It’s not rare for these volunteers to pay a lot of money for a six week stay in a so-called “rescue station” or a “game reserve”.
    However these offers have nothing to do with the protection of species or animals. The young lions suffer on these farms. Anyone doing volunteer work or gaining work experience here is supporting the horrific lion industry – even if they don’t intend to or realise that they are doing so.

    Generally, the sad end destination ofSouth African captive lions is a Canned Hunting farm.

    Adult lions end as trophies …

    Lions reach trophy age after four to seven years and then become available on the market for trophy hunting. In many cases the ‘hunting’ isn’t carried out on the same farm that the animal was bred at. Instead the lions are transported to other areas and shot there. Most of the breeding and hunting stations in South Africa are located in the provinces of Free State, North West and Limpopo.

    … and bones sold to Asia

    The escalating lion bone trade also poses a serious threat to captive animals and wild lion populations. Euthanizing healthy lions and tigers for their bones is legal in South Africa with a permit! Bones from hunted animals are also exported. The selling of lion bones to Asian countries like China, Laos or Vietnam for use in traditional medicine products has become an important and lucrative business for South African lion farmers.

    Source Four Paws


    'Canned hunting': the lions bred for slaughter

    Canned hunting is a fast-growing business in South Africa, where thousands of lions are being bred on farms to be shot by wealthy foreign trophy-hunters

    They are adorably cute, with grubby brown fur so soft it seems to slip through my fingers like flour. It is only when one of the nine-week-old cubs playfully grabs my arm with its teeth and squeezes with an agonising grip that I remember – this is a lion, a wild animal. These four cubs are not wild, however. They are kept in a small pen behind the Lion's Den, a pub on a ranch in desolate countryside 75 miles south of Johannesburg. Tourists stop to pet them but most visitors do not venture over the hill, where the ranch has pens holding nearly 50 juvenile and fully-grown lions, and two tigers.

    Moreson ranch is one of more than 160 such farms legally breeding big cats in South Africa. There are now more lions held in captivity (upwards of 5,000) in the country than live wild (about 2,000). While the owners of this ranch insist they do not hunt and kill their lions, animal welfare groups say most breeders sell their stock to be shot dead by wealthy trophy-hunters from Europe and North America, or for traditional medicine in Asia. The easy slaughter of animals in fenced areas is called "canned hunting", perhaps because it's rather like shooting fish in a barrel. A fully-grown, captive-bred lion is taken from its pen to an enclosed area where it wanders listlessly for some hours before being shot dead by a man with a shotgun, hand-gun or even a crossbow, standing safely on the back of a truck. forHe pays anything from £5,000 to £25,000, and it is all completely legal.

    Like other tourists and daytrippers from Jo'burg, I pay a more modest £3.50 to hug the lions at Moreson, a game ranch which on its website invites tourists to come and enjoy the canned hunting of everything from pretty blesbok and springbok – South Africa's national symbol – to lions and crocodiles. After a cuddle with the cubs, I go on a "game drive" through the 2,000 hectare estate. Herds of blue wildebeest, red hartebeest and eland run from the truck, then stop and watch us, warily: according to the guides, the animals seem to know when visitors are not carrying guns. At the far end of the property is an abandoned farm, surrounded by pens of lethargic-looking big cats. One pair mate in front of us. Two healthy looking tigers tear at chicken carcasses rapidly rotting in the African sun.

    The animals look well cared for. But Cathleen Benade, a ranch assistant who is studying wildlife photography and is devoted to the cubs, reveals that they were taken away from their mothers just an hour after birth and bottle-fed by humans for the first eight weeks of their life. After dark, as the lions roar in the cages below the pub veranda, Maryke Van Der Merwe, the manager of Lion's Den and daughter of the ranch owner, explains that if the cubs weren't separated from their mother – by blowing a horn to scare the adult lion away – the young lions would starve to death, because their mother had no milk. She says the mother is not distressed: "She's looking for the cubs for a few hours but it's not like she's sad. After a day or two I don't think she remembered that she had cubs."

    Animal welfare experts disagree, however. They say breeders remove the cubs from their mother so that the lioness will quickly become fertile again, as they squeeze as many cubs from their adults as possible – five litters every two years. For an animal that is usually weaned at six months, missing out on the crucial colostrum, or first milk, can cause ill-health. "These breeders tell you they removed the cubs because the mother had no milk; I've never seen that in the wild," says Pieter Kat, an evolutionary biologist who has worked with wild lions in Kenya and Botswana. "Lions and tigers in captivity may kill their young because they are under a lot of stress. But the main reason breeders separate the young from their mother is because they don't want them to be dependant on their mother. Separation brings the female back into a reproductive position much faster than if the cubs were around. It's a conveyor-belt production of animals."
    lion bred in captivity in south africa

    South Africa has a strong hunting tradition but few people express much enthusiasm for its debased canned form. It is still legal to bring a lion carcass back to Britain (or anywhere in Europe or North America) as a trophy, and much of the demand comes from overseas. Trophy-hunters are attracted by the guarantee of success, and the price: a wild lion shot on a safari in Tanzania may cost £50,000, compared with a £5,000 captive-bred specimen in South Africa. Five years ago, the South African government effectively banned canned hunting by requiring an animal to roam free for two years before it could be hunted, severely restricting breeders and hunters' profitability. But lion breeders challenged the policy in South Africa's courts and a high court judge eventually ruled that such restrictions were "not rational". The number of trophy hunted animals has since soared. In the five years to 2006, 1,830 lion trophies were exported from South Africa; in the five years to 2011, 4,062 were exported, a 122% increase, and the vast majority captive-bred animals.

    Demand from the Far East is also driving profits for lions breeders. In 2001, two lions were exported as "trophies" to China, Laos and Vietnam; in 2011, 70 lion trophies were exported to those nations. While the trade in tiger parts is now illegal, demand for lion parts for traditional Asian medicine is soaring. In 2009, five lion skeletons were exported from South Africa to Laos; in 2011, it was 496. The legal export of lion bones and whole carcasses has also soared. "It's definitely a rapidly growing source of revenue for these canned breeding facilities," says Will Travers of the charity Born Free. "The increase and volume are terrifying."

    Breeders argue it is better that hunters shoot a captive-bred lion than further endanger the wild populations, but conservationists and animal welfare groups dispute this. Wild populations of lions have declined by 80% in 20 years, so the rise of lion farms and canned hunting has not protected wild lions. In fact, according to Fiona Miles, director of Lionsrock, a big cat sanctuary in South Africa run by the charity Four Paws, it is fuelling it. The lion farms' creation of a market for canned lion hunts puts a clear price-tag on the head of every wild lion, she says; they create a financial incentive for local people, who collude with poachers or turn a blind eye to illegal lion kills. Trophy-hunters who begin with a captive-bred lion may then graduate to the real, wild thing.

    "It's factory-farming of lions, and it's shocking," says Miles. She began working to protect lions after watching a seminal documentary about canned hunting. "The lion all around the world is known as the iconic king of the jungle – that's how it's portrayed in advertising and written into story books – and yet people have reduced it to a commodity, something that can be traded and used."

    An alternative use for the captive-bred lions might be tourism. We go for a "lion walk" with Martin Quinn, a conservation educator and lion whisperer. This involves strolling through the veld with three adolescent white lions, which have been bred on Moreson ranch and trained by Quinn and his assistant, Thompson. These striking white lions (which tend to be very inbred, say animal welfare groups) bound around us, rush on, and then lie in the grass, ready for an ambush. Armed only with sticks, Quinn and Thompson control them, while warning us that they are still wild animals. It is an unnerving experience, but Quinn hopes this venture will persuade Moreson ranch that a live lion is worth more than a dead one.

    He claims that since he began working with lions at the ranch in January, the owners have not sold on any lions to be hunted. He hopes the ranch will eventually allow the offspring of its captive animals to grow up in the wild. (Breeders sometimes claim their lions are for conservation programmes but examples of captive-bred lions becoming wild animals again are vanishingly rare; even the most respectable zoo has never established a successful programme for releasing captive-bred lions into the wild.)

    Pieter Kat, who founded the charity Lion Aid, says the lion walks are simply another income stream for breeders before their lucrative charges are sold on. Van Der Merwe is doubtful that Quinn's lion walks could replace the income the farm receives from selling its lions: "We keep them up until six months for attractions for the people so they can play with them and then we sell them to other lion parks," she says. She insists her ranch's website is wrong, and it does not hunt lions: "We sell them to other people who have the permit for lions. What they do with the lions is up to them. So we don't know what they do with the lions, but we don't do the canned hunting."

    Three hours' drive from the ranch is Lionsrock, a former lion breeding farm transformed into a sanctuary for more than 80 abused big cats since it was bought by Four Paws. Some come from local breeding farms, but Four Paws also rescues animals kept in appalling conditions in zoos in Romania, Jordan and the Congo. Unlike in the lion farms, the animals here are not allowed to breed, and instead live within large enclosures in their natural prides, family groups of up to 10 lions.

    Lionsrock can rehouse another 100 lions but does not have space for every captive-bred lion in South Africa. Four Paws and other charities working in South Africa want a moratorium on lion breeding because they fear that if lion farms were abruptly outlawed thousands of lions would be dumped or killed. After its high court defeat, there is little sign that the South African government will take on the powerful lion breeders again any time soon. "If we can stop people supporting those industries in the first place and make them aware of what's actually going on and what the life of a [captive-bred] lion is actually like, I believe there will be an outcry," says Miles. "There's far more value for a live lion long-term."

    Lion breeders such as Van Der Merwe are not so sure. She says her caged lions have little to do with canned hunting, but admits that if the authorities banned canned hunting, "it would probably not be good for us … There's a lot of people from overseas coming to shoot lions. All the people know you come to Africa to shoot the lion or have a mount against your wall to say 'I've shot a lion'. They surely bring some money into South Africa."

    She sees nothing wrong with hunting lions or keeping them in captivity. In fact, she says, she is part of a family of animal lovers: "We grew up with them, so it's nice. It's like babies in your house – when they are really small they walk around in your house and they follow you."
    Source The Guardian
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nevan View Post
    I've talked about this before but I am from a culture/area that is heavily pro-hunting. I don't hunt myself, but I have numerous friends and family that do hunt. It's almost always white-tailed deer, which are waaaay overpopulated in my area. There is a rabbit season and a bird (quail, pheasant, turkey, etc.) season, but it is mostly white-tailed deer. And the people who hunt them around here are NOT hunting them because they're eating someone's tulips ... it's because there are SO many deer here that they cause numerous traffic accidents, a good portion of them are fatal. Try being on a mostly desolate highway late at night with wooded areas on both sides during rutting season. They just come out of nowhere and you have no choice but to plow into them.

    I don't know a single soul who hunts and doesn't eat or share everything they kill. Are we in a poor area that requires deer meat to supplement their diets? No. But to the people that eat it here, it's considered a game-y delicacy (there is a big difference in taste from supermarket meat and game meat) and *none* of the deer meat goes to waste, plus add in the fact that they're helping to control a massive overpopulation that has become a physical risk to your (and every one else's) life from MVAs. They're really not even financially benefitting from hunting, except being able to eat deer meat instead of meat from the supermarket (and even that is misleading because it costs big bucks to have a deer butchered -- I don't know anyone that butchers their own deer), and have to pay ever-increasing hunting permit fees for each and every season we have --- like muzzleloader season, bow season, shotgun season, doe day (does are only allowed to be hunted during one day), and on and on. There are numerous check points (usually attached to a butcher) where you by law have to bring in the dead deer to be weighed and ticked off your hunting license (you're only allowed so many kills per season).
    Thanks for the lecture, but you didn't tell me anything I don't already know. My husband is from South Jersey, and the hunting culture is also big here in the Midwest. I know about the deer running all over the rural roads and highways, I've had enough near-misses that have scared the crap out of me. I also know that game meat tastes different from grocery store meat.

    I'm sure I won't change your mind about anything, but I guess my question is, if there's such a major overpopulation of deer, wreaking all this havoc, why don't the States do anything major to reduce the numbers? Why all these limits and time frames and seasons? Ummm could it be because deer hunting is a major source of revenue? Hunting is big business for them, between license fees and tourism, and pays the salaries of all those wildlife managers. And tax revenue from retailers like Cabela's and Bass Pro etc. Every year more and more deer are killed, yet the population never decreases, imagine that.

    Even my State's DNR site states it’s a MYTH that they are trying to reduce deer numbers. Instead, their deer management is to "reduce conflicts between residents and deer where they are most problematic." (including urban areas like mine, where the complaints are indeed about deer destroying suburban landscaping, never mind that it's their landscaping which is driving the deer from the State parks to their little private smorgasbords) The site further states that many counties "have regulations set up to maintain or even increase deer numbers."

    Seriously, does that sound to you like an effort to control overpopulation and keep the menace deer off the roadways to protect the human population? Doesn't sound like it to me. Don't kid yourself, they want to keep the deer plentiful to attract hunters and dollars. That's the bottom line. My problem isn't with hunters or the culture, it's more about the lip service from the system that hunting is providing a public service (which the hunters pay big money to do) And don't even get me started on the idiots in my community who think the answer is to lure deer into a residential area and shoot them with high-powered rifles in full view of private citizens just trying to enjoy their backyards.

    And…to conclude this festo, as I stated previously, bringing deer into this particular conversation was probably a mistake, because many people only look at them as nuisance animals. Tasty nuisance animals.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trixie View Post
    Thanks for the lecture, but you didn't tell me anything I don't already know. My husband is from South Jersey, and the hunting culture is also big here in the Midwest. I know about the deer running all over the rural roads and highways, I've had enough near-misses that have scared the crap out of me. I also know that game meat tastes different from grocery store meat.

    I'm sure I won't change your mind about anything, but I guess my question is, if there's such a major overpopulation of deer, wreaking all this havoc, why don't the States do anything major to reduce the numbers? Why all these limits and time frames and seasons? Ummm could it be because deer hunting is a major source of revenue? Hunting is big business for them, between license fees and tourism, and pays the salaries of all those wildlife managers. And tax revenue from retailers like Cabela's and Bass Pro etc. Every year more and more deer are killed, yet the population never decreases, imagine that.

    Even my State's DNR site states it’s a MYTH that they are trying to reduce deer numbers. Instead, their deer management is to "reduce conflicts between residents and deer where they are most problematic." (including urban areas like mine, where the complaints are indeed about deer destroying suburban landscaping, never mind that it's their landscaping which is driving the deer from the State parks to their little private smorgasbords) The site further states that many counties "have regulations set up to maintain or even increase deer numbers."

    Seriously, does that sound to you like an effort to control overpopulation and keep the menace deer off the roadways to protect the human population? Doesn't sound like it to me. Don't kid yourself, they want to keep the deer plentiful to attract hunters and dollars. That's the bottom line. My problem isn't with hunters or the culture, it's more about the lip service from the system that hunting is providing a public service (which the hunters pay big money to do) And don't even get me started on the idiots in my community who think the answer is to lure deer into a residential area and shoot them with high-powered rifles in full view of private citizens just trying to enjoy their backyards.

    And…to conclude this festo, as I stated previously, bringing deer into this particular conversation was probably a mistake, because many people only look at them as nuisance animals. Tasty nuisance animals.
    I'm sorry you took it that way, but it definitely was *not* a lecture. Your quote just inspired me to talk about a subject that is very well known to me from living in the same area all my life. Of course there are numerous people that live in my area or even in a similar area to mine. But it definitely surprises me how many people actually believe hunters are always 100% bad and committing an atrocious act, especially if they are from the U.S. (because, you know, all U.S. citizens are insanely wealthy and aggressive and we do whatever the hell we want /sarcasm).

    I truly believe that my state is being true and responsive about the merits of keeping the deer population at a safe level. There are many areas around me that are very populated (we're the most densely populated state in the nation, and we're a pretty small state, size-wise) that can't even rely on hunters to help keep the population down because the humans are just too densely populated. A good example of this (because almost everybody has heard of the Ivy League university) is the town of Princeton. They cannot allow shotgun or even bow hunters into their area because someone(s) will get injured or killed, so they hire what they call "professional" hunters who find the most deer and shoot them in the brain with a bolt, instantly killing them. It's tragic, because at that point it's more about safety than the sport of it, but towns like that have no other choice, unless they want to put the public at large in danger, which is always a stupid idea. Further, it's not an uncommon sight to watch a patrol officer or a State Trooper on the side of the road, pulling the deer carcasses out of the way of the traffic patterns. They are just simply that numerous and I'm not talking about rural areas, I'm talking about regular suburban towns with 80'x100' lots and deer way up in even Northern Jersey. Usually they're just left there for other animals to do their job.

    I agree wholeheartedly that the states that have this kind of massive overpopulation are not learning from past mistakes and seasons, just like mine isn't. I think the biggest problem in my state is that there is only ONE doe day. So there could only be 20 bucks in a mile radius, but there's 50-100 does in the same radius. It disturbs me that they don't realize that one buck could mate with 15 females, or maybe they do and I'm just being naive. I know when doe day comes around, there are heavy protests about it. In my state, I've encountered many Fish & Wildlife officers because they are always out there doing things with the community, like (a catch and release, after they've stocked the lake) a youth fishing derby (I can't even count how many we've been to) in multiple areas, gun safety classes for youth and adults alike, showing up unannounced at popular hunting spots to make sure you're all legal (even though I don't hunt, I've been in hunting parties) and other similar things. I've spoken to quite a few of them over the years and I've never really gotten a solid answer to my question about why only one doe day, or if we had more, do they think it would help to thin out the herd.

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