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Thread: World Vets

  1. #16
    Elite Member Witchywoman's Avatar
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    I agree this is heartbreaking but its comforting to know they are getting help.

  2. #17
    Elite Member Honey's Avatar
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    I hope you don't mind me adding this story witchywoman. These men rescued a porpoise

    Rescuers haver returned a baby porpoise to the sea after it survived in a paddy field for two weeks when it was washed a mile inland by the Japanese tsunami.
    The youngster was dumped there by the tsunami which experts now believe was up to 14 metres high when it devastated the east coast of Japan on March 11.
    Pet-shop owner Ryo Taira, who has been rescuing animals abandoned after the catastrophe, said: 'A man passing by said he had found the dolphin in the rice paddy and that we had to do something to save it.'

    Ryo Taira and Takashi Wagatsuma pull the stricken porpoise from the flooded paddy field a mile inland

    They tried to catch the the youngster in a net, but couldn't so had to resort instead to wading in

    Taira, 32, found the porpoise struggling in the shallow seawater and after failing to net it, waded in to the field to cradle the 4ft creature to safety.
    'It was pretty weak by then, which was probably the only reason we could catch it,' he said.
    He wrapped it in wet towels and drove it back to the sea, where he set it free. He said it appeared to perk up at the sight of the Pacific, he said.
    'I don't know if it will live, but it's certainly a lot better than dying in a rice paddy,' Taira told the Asahi Shimbun newspaper.

    With great care they prepared the porpose for the trip back to the sea


    After suffering from the ordeal of the tsunami, the porpoise's knight in shining armour returned it to the sea two weeks later

    Finless porpoises, which lack a dorsal fin, can grow to be about 1.6 meters (about 5 feet) long. They are native to much of coastal Asia.
    Sendai, 320 kilometers (200 miles) north of Tokyo, was among many communities that suffered massive damage when the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami struck, wrecking entire communities.
    Dogwood pet shop in Sendai has become a collecting point for strays and pets whose owners have lost their homes in the disaster and are unable to bring the animals with them to shelters.

    Read more: Japan tsunami: Baby porpoise returned sea after swept a mile inland | Mail Online

  3. #18
    Elite Member Witchywoman's Avatar
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    Oh Honey I don't mind, it's a wonderful story. So glad to hear they are pulling together to help all the animals. This could have been so tragic for the dolphin, just by chance it was spotted.

  4. #19
    Super Moderator twitchy2.0's Avatar
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    Finding creature comfort in a living hell

    April 1, 2011 - 4:50PM


    Shoko Igarashi hugs her dog that will have to be looked after by friends while she goes into a shelter in Koriyama in Fukushima prefecture. Photo: AFP

    Hungry, hurt and separated from owners who are either dead or in evacuation centres, hundreds of family pets are struggling to survive in the desolation of Japan's tsunami-ravaged northeast coast.
    Among the many rescue teams sent from around the world to search for survivors and bodies after Japan's worst natural disaster for nearly a century, a handful of specialised animal rescue groups have also been at work.
    In the days immediately after the March 11 tsunami that wiped out dozens of thriving coastal towns, the prospects looked grim.
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    A cat waits to be claimed at the Green Animal Hospital in the town of Miyako . Photo: AFP

    "In the hardest hit areas, we saw no animal life whatsoever," said Ashley Fruno, from animal rights group PETA.
    "We did see some paw prints in the mud at one point, but they didn't lead anywhere, and we could not find any animals nearby."
    Slowly but surely, however, abandoned pets began to emerge, often from damaged homes where they had managed to ride out the destructive force of the tsunami.
    Many pet owners left their cats and dogs when the tsunami warning sounded, never imagining that the wave would be as large and powerful as it eventually was.
    The animals were left to fend for themselves in a hostile environment with no food or fresh water.
    Japan Earthquake Animal Rescue and Support (JEARS), a hastily assembled coalition of animal welfare groups, has spent the last two weeks searching what's left of the worst-hit coastal towns.
    The teams, which include several volunteer vets, provide food and treatment for injured animals and try to find temporary shelters for those that have lost their owners.
    They also visit evacuation centres where those people who escaped the tsunami with their pets are having trouble holding on to them in difficult, cramped surroundings where animals are not always welcome.
    "There have been some problems in the centres, with tensions between those with pets and those without," said vet Kazumasu Sasaki.
    "Some people have pet allergies, and they complain that the dogs are barking and fighting. It's understandable."
    There have been cases of people choosing to stay in their ruined houses because shelters refused to accommodate pets, and JEARS coordinator Isabella Gallaon-Aoki said it was difficult to persuade those in the centres that their animals would be better off in a temporary shelter.
    "People here see pets as family members. For some, after everything that has happened, their pet is the only thing they can cling on to -- the only thing that brings them comfort," she said.
    Timo Takazawa, who survived the tsunami along with her husband, refused to give up their dog, Momo, despite complaints from other evacuees in their crowded shelter in the city of Sendai.
    "When we escaped from the tsunami we didn't take anything, just Momo," said Takazawa, 65.
    "I can't imagine not being here together. If anybody said to me I couldn't keep Momo here, we would leave with her, we would go somewhere else."
    Animals have featured in a number of unusual tsunami survival stories, most notably a porpoise rescued from a rice field after it was washed two kilometres (1.2 miles) inland.
    Then there was the case of Tashirojima island in Miyagi Prefecture, known locally as "Cat Island" for its feral feline population that vastly outnumbers the 100 or so human residents.
    The tiny island was engulfed by the tsunami -- but a rescue team that flew in by helicopter reported that both cats and people had come out unscathed.
    In Sendai, tsunami warden Mr Kamata tried to return for his dog -- a large pedigree Akita -- after warning neighbours about the incoming wave, but found his way blocked by the churning water.
    "I thought there was no way he could have survived. It was terribly sad," Kamata said.
    But later that night, as he sheltered in a refuge with hundreds of other residents, Kamata heard that a dog had been found outside.
    "It was him. He'd swum and found me. He'd ingested a lot of sea water and kept throwing up and I thought I was going to lose him anyway, but he pulled through," Kamata said.
    Heartwarming stories of survival aside, PETA's Fruno said that animal welfare groups would be busy in tsunami-affected areas for some time to come.
    "Recovery from this disaster is going to take months, if not years," she said.
    "People in the hardest hit areas will continue to need pet food and veterinary supplies, as will the animal shelters, which will also need to house animals until their homeless guardians are able to find somewhere to live."
    Finding creature comfort in a living hell
    As Canadian as possible under the circumstances

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    "What's traitors, precious?" -- President Gollum

  5. #20
    Elite Member Witchywoman's Avatar
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    Another pallet of supplies is shipping out today from our Fargo headquarters to help the animals in Japan. This one has cages, leashes, collars, food bowls, vet supplies, Kongs, etc-all items requested by our friends at Japan Earthquake Animal Rescue and Support. This one will arrive in Niigata Japan by the end of the week. World Vets veterinarian Dr Koji Fukumura is in Niigata this week providing care to animals in the shelters. Another World Vets team is heading out tomorrow and will be going to Sendai Japan




  6. #21
    Super Moderator twitchy2.0's Avatar
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    Bumping.

    Rescuing animals from within the radioactive exclusion zone:
    Pet Rescuers Venture Into Japan's Exclusion Zone - In Focus - The Atlantic
    As Canadian as possible under the circumstances

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    "What's traitors, precious?" -- President Gollum

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