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Thread: Spider monkey rejected by its mother clings to teddy

  1. #31
    Elite Member Sarzy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carrievaught View Post
    Why do they reject their young?
    It tends to happen with some apes/ monkeys that haven't been raised in the wild, it doesn't come as naturally to them. I know with Orangutans that if their mother was killed when they were young they can have a hard time caring for their own babies as they learn a lot from their mother.

  2. #32
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    ^^^^^ How sad.

  3. #33
    Elite Member Honey's Avatar
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    With her huge doe eyes and fluffy hair, it's hard to believe that this baby spider monkey was abandoned by her mother at birth.
    Little Estela and her mother Sunshine failed to bond after she was born in January forcing primate keepers at Melbourne Zoo to step in and care for her around the clock to ensure her survival.
    Primate supervisor Jess McKelson and her team have had to feed the tiny newborn a formula mixture by hand to build up her strength.
    Hanging tough: The baby Spider Monkey which is native to Central America, is currently receiving six feeds of formula a day and is now slowly being introduced to solid foods

    What a cutie! It seems hard to believe that this adorable baby spider monkey was abandoned by its mother, but at least grandmother Sonya is on hand at Melbourne Zoo to ensure little Estela is behaving herself

    But the playful youngster is growing bigger by the day and is now being introduced to solid food.
    Luckily, grandmother Sonya is on hand to keep a watchful eye on the mischievous toddler who thinks nothing of playfully teasing and prodding her surrogate family.
    Spider monkeys are often found in the tropical forests of Central and South America, from southern Mexico to Brazil.
    They have disproportionately long limbs and a long prehensile tail makes them one of the largest New World monkeys and gives rise to their common name.

    Cheeky monkey: Primate supervisor Jess McKelson and her team have been looking after Estela around the clock since she was abandoned. The playful youngster seems perfectly at home teasing her new carers with a poke in the eye though

    Playtime: It looks like Estela's grandmother Sonya is in for a rough ride as the tiny spider monkey playfully pulls her ear

    Spider monkeys usually live in the upper layers of the rainforest and forage in the high canopy, from 25 to 30metres (82 to 98ft).
    They primarily eat fruit, but will also occasionally consume leaves, flowers, and insects.
    Due to their large size, spider monkeys require large tracts of moist evergreen forests and prefer undisturbed primary rainforest.
    They are social animals and live in bands of up to 35, but will split up to forage during the day.


    Read more: What a cutie! Baby spider monkey abandoned at birth runs amok at Melbourne Zoo | Mail Online

  4. #34
    Elite Member Brookie's Avatar
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    OH MY GOODNESS - THE CUTENESS!!!!!!!!

    A long time ago, some next door neighbors had one of these as a pet for a while. The dad, an eccentric SOB, smuggled one into the country from a trip to Europe. Got into EVERYTHING in the house and basically destroyed it. Not sure what they did with it, but the place was a mess. Cute little guy for a while though.
    Life is short. Break the Rules. Forgive Quickly. Kiss Slowly. Love Truly.
    Laugh Uncontrollably. And never regret ANYTHING that makes you smile.

    - Mark Twain

  5. #35
    Elite Member Laxmobster's Avatar
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    Awww I love this lil monkey!
    Quote Originally Posted by Celestial View Post
    I also choose to believe the rumors because I am, when it is all said and done, a dirty gossip.

  6. #36
    Elite Member JadeStar70's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarzy View Post
    It tends to happen with some apes/ monkeys that haven't been raised in the wild, it doesn't come as naturally to them. I know with Orangutans that if their mother was killed when they were young they can have a hard time caring for their own babies as they learn a lot from their mother.

    Can't any animal reject their young? I know we have had a lot of kittens born at our house over the years, and several have dumped their litters. We were just lucky we have several farm cats that would always take on another mouth or two. It seems to happen with some cats first litters.

    I am not a monkey/ape fan,...but this little shit is cute. He looks like a stuffed animal through the face.

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