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Thread: Massive increase in dogs poisoned by chocolate & grapes, fed to them by their owners

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    Elite Member Honey's Avatar
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    Thumbs down Massive increase in dogs poisoned by chocolate & grapes, fed to them by their owners

    Record numbers of dogs are being poisoned after being fed chocolate, grapes and raisins by their owners as treats, say vets.

    Vets have seen a surge of almost 50 per cent in the number of dogs falling ill after eating chocolate.

    In 2006, vets made 790 emergency calls about chocolate poisoning to the Veterinary Poisons Information Service. Last year, the figure was 1,166.


    Adorable: But more and more dogs are suffering from poisoning because of their love of sweet food

    The number of pets poisoned by eating grapes, raisins or sultanas has almost doubled from 117 in 2006 to 224 last year.
    According to the service, which advises vets, a total of 17,000 cases of poisoned cats and dogs were reported last year - up 20 per cent on 2007.

    Chocolate contains theobromine, a naturally occurring stimulant found in the cocoa bean, which affects the central nervous system and heart and can kill a dog.

    The danger depends on the dog's size and the type of chocolate. Darker and more expensive chocolate contains more theobromine. Humans, and cats, have the metabolism to cope with theobromine.

    Toxins in grapes, raisins or sultanas can cause renal failure in dogs. In some cases, small dogs have died after eating as few as four grapes. Vets believe many owners are unaware of the dangers and have fed their pets cake and biscuits containing chocolate or grapes as treats. In other cases the animals have helped themselves.

    The figures do not show how many of the poisoned pets died.

    Alexander Campbell, of the Veterinary Poisons Information Service, said: 'It often tends to be scavenging-type dogs, like labradors and Jack Russells, that find chocolate about the house and are attracted to the smell.'


    There has also been a rise in the number of dogs eating painkillers. The number of dogs snapping up ibuprofen has gone up by 22 per cent, paracetamol by 20 per cent and aspirin by 24 per cent. These can sometimes be fatal.

    Vets believe the animals sometimes find the drugs lying around the house. in many cases, however, pets are given the pills by their owners when they are injured, as it is cheaper than going to a vet.
    There was a similar increase in the number of dogs treated after eating oral contraceptive tablets – the sixth most common cause of canine poisoning.

    Most of the cases reported to the VPIS related to dogs, with cats second.

    The most common cases of poisoning among cats involve animals that are treated using a type of flea treatment meant for dogs.

    The service, which is part of a toxicology unit at London's Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital, also reported an increase in poisoned rabbits because of the growing trend for owners to keep the pets indoors.

    Chris Laurence, veterinary director of the Dogs Trust, said: 'Dogs' habits don't change much and nor do people's. Dogs eat what they can and people will still eat chocolate, grapes and raisins and will still leave them around, while some will still feed them to their dogs.

    'I wonder if people are a little bit more careless these days about leaving things lying around and with costs going up, are willing to try to give their pets their own pills.'

    Massive increase in dogs poisoned by chocolate and grapes - fed to them by their owners | Mail Online

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    A*O
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    If you don't know that chocolate is toxic to dogs then you shouldn't own a dog in the first place. Duh.
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    Elite Member *DIVA!'s Avatar
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    Everyone who comes into my house(even the toddlers)knows that he cannot have people food! especially chocolate, grapes, and any corn products!!
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    A*O
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    Onions are bad news too. We have a very strict rule in this house about not giving the dogs ANYTHING apart from their own dried dogfood twice a day. I do have some dried liver snack things but they are special treats and given sparingly.
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    Elite Member Just Kill Me's Avatar
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    What a bunch of fucking idiots!!!

    I remember waking up years ago while I had a friend staying with me and I saw bits of foil everywhere; I was freaking out calling the vet and yelling at my friend "How big was the chocolate bunny!?!?!?!?" The vet said she would need to poo alot but based on her weight she would be okay; but still. I was so scared.
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    Elite Member WhateverLolaWants's Avatar
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    The sweetener used in most sugar-free gums is also quite toxic to dogs, for anyone who doesn't know.
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    One day my boyfriend had left a 8x8 pan of brownies on the counter, and his Jack Russle/Fox Terrier ate the whole thing. He was gone to work and forgot they were there, came back they were gone, dog was fine thankfully. I was flipping out when I found out the next day.

    I know a lot of people who didn't know chocolate was toxic to dogs until I said something. I was surprised because I thought that was a common thing. I think tomatos are bad as well.

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    my dog used to do tricks for M&Ms. he lived to be 18.
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    I thought it was common knowledge that dogs can't tolerate chocolate. I learned this as a child and we never even had a dog- I'm amazed people who actually go to the trouble of getting a dog wouldn't know about something like this. Shouldn't one try to learn something about the basic care of an animal before acquiring one

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    A*O
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    ^^ Not just animals. There are a lot of parents out there who need to learn the basics about looking after kids too.
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    Please everyone-don't forget to put www.freekibble.com in your favorites. This reminded me since it was the Cat Trivia question yesterday!

    Avacodos can be harmeful too-can kill a parrot !
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    I killed my pet gerbil when I was about 7, by giving him chocolate. I thought I was being so kind to him giving him this tasty treat.

    As an adult of course I know better. None of our pets get Human foods really, apart from the odd bit of carrot for the dog.

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    Common Foods That Are Harmful Or Even Fatal to Dogs

    Many common foods are actually harmful or even fatal to dogs. Some of these (listed below) will surprise you. Others are things you would never give your dog purposefully, but now you will be more careful to not let them be in your dog's reach. And some just need to be limited to small amounts.

    Avocados (fruit, pit, and plant) are toxic to dogs. Avocados contain a toxic component called persin, which can damage heart, lung and other tissue in many animals. They are high in fat and can trigger stomach upset, vomiting and even pancreatitis. Symptoms of toxicity include difficulty breathing, abdominal enlargement, abnormal fluid accumulations in the chest, abdomen and sac around the heart. The amount that needs to be ingested to cause signs is unknown. The effects on dogs and cats are not completely understood. GI signs are commonly seen and should be treated symptomatically. In addition, the animal should be monitored closely for other clinical signs related to the cardiovascular system. (This information comes from veterinarians, the American Veterinary Medicine Association, and the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.)

    Onions destroy red blood cells and can cause anemia, weakness, and breathing difficulty. Even small amounts can cause cumulative damage over time. This includes onions or chives - raw, powdered, dehydrated, or cooked.

    Large amounts of garlic cause the same problems as onions. Garlic contains only a small amount of the problematic substance that is in onions. Just as with people, moderation is the key.

    Grapes and raisins can cause kidney failure in dogs. As little as a single serving of raisins can kill him. If the dog doesn't eat enough at one time to be fatal, he can be severely damaged by eating just a few grapes or raisins regularly.

    Tomatoes (plant and fruit) contain tomatine, an alkaloid related to solanine. As the fruit ripens, the tomatine is metabolized. Therefore, ripe tomatoes are less likely to be problematic for animals. Clinical signs of poisoning include lethargy, drooling, difficulty breathing, colic, vomiting, diarrhea or constipation, widely-dilated pupils, paralysis, cardiac effects, central nervous system signs (e.g., ataxia, muscle weakness, tremors, seizures), resulting from cholinesterase inhibition, coma and death. (This information comes from veterinarians, and the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.) (All parts of the plant except the tomato itself are poisonous to humans, although some people are sensitive to the ripe fruit also.)
    Tomatoes also contain atropine, which can cause dilated pupils, tremors, and heart arrhythmias. The highest concentration of atropine is found in the leaves and stems of tomato plants, with less in unripe (green) tomatoes, and even less in ripe (red) tomatoes.
    Nutmeg can cause tremors, seizures and death.

    Caffeine (from coffee, coffee grounds, tea, or tea bags) stimulates the central nervous and cardiac systems, and can cause vomiting, restlessness, heart palpitations, and even death within hours.

    Diet products containing the sweetener Xylitol can cause a sudden drop in blood sugar, resulting in depression, loss of coordination and seizures. Unless treatment is given quickly, the dog could die.

    Macadamia nuts can cause weakness, muscle tremor and paralysis. These symptoms are usually temporary.

    Walnuts. When dogs eat the seed hulls, they can get an upset stomach and diarrhea. The real problem is the fungus or mold that attacks walnuts after they get wet (from rain or sprinklers), which produces toxins. If the fungus or mold is ingested by your dogs, they can become very ill and possibly die. Signs that should alert you to walnut poisoning are vomiting, trembling, drooling, lack of coordination, lethargy, loss of appetite, and jaundice indications such as yellowing eyes and gums. Severely affected dogs can produce blood-tinged vomit or stools. Dogs can take several days to exhibit serious signs of illness.

    Chocolate can cause seizures, coma and death. Baker’s chocolate is the most dangerous. The darker the chocolate, the more dangerous it is. But any chocolate, in large enough amounts, can kill a dog. An ounce of chocolate can poison a 30-pound dog, and many dogs will happily consume more than this. The symptoms may not show up for several hours (and so might make you think all is well), with death following within twenty-four hours. A dog can consume milk chocolate and appear to be fine because it is not as concentrated, but it is still dangerous.

    Apple seeds, cherry pits, peach pits, pear pips, plums pits, and apricot pits contain cyanide, which is poisonous. While a few apple seeds may not cause a problem, the effects can accumulate over time if they are given to dogs regularly. Dogs should not be allowed to chew on a peach pit, cherry pit, apricot pit, or plum pit. Chewing can allow ingestion of cyanide. Chewing could also result in the pit being swallowed, causing continuous exposure to cyanide, or could cause the dog to choke.

    Too much salt can cause kidney problems. Also, large breeds of dogs that eat salty food may then drink too much water and develop bloat, which is fatal unless emergency treatment is given very quickly.

    Too much fat or fried foods can cause pancreatitis.

    Ham and bacon contain too much fat and too much salt, and can cause pancreatitis. Also, large breeds of dogs that eat salty food may drink too much water and develop a life-threatening condition called bloat. This is where the stomach fills up with gas and within several hours may twist, causing death.

    Raw liver or too much cooked liver (three servings a week) can lead to vitamin A toxicity. This can cause deformed bones, excessive bone growth on the elbows and spine, weight loss, and anorexia. Check the label of your canned dog food to be sure that it does not contain liver if you are giving your dog liver also.

    Wild mushrooms can cause abdominal pain, drooling, liver damage, kidney damage, vomiting, diarrhea, convulsions, coma, or death.

    Raw egg whites contain a protein called avidin, which can deplete your dog of biotin, one of the B vitamins. Biotin is essential to your dog’s growth and coat health. The lack of it can cause hair loss, weakness, growth retardation, or skeleton deformity. Raw egg yolks contain enough biotin to prevent the deficiency, so this is not a problem with raw whole eggs. Raw egg yolks could contain salmonella, so you should get your eggs from a reliable source or cook the eggs.

    Grains should not be given in large amounts or make up a large part of a dog’s diet, but rice is generally safe in small amounts.

    Cooked bones can splinter and tear a dog’s internal organs.

    Dogs can't digest most vegetables (carrots, green beans, lettuce, potatoes or yams) whole or in large pieces. Potato peels and green potatoes are dangerous.

    Dairy products are high in fat, which can cause pancreatitis, gas and diarrhea. A small amount of non-fat, plain yogurt is usually safe.

    Pennies made from the 1980s to today contain zinc, which can cause kidney failure and damage to red blood cells. A dog that consumes even one penny can become quite sick, or even die, if the penny is not removed.



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    Elite Member WhateverLolaWants's Avatar
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    Now i may be misunderstanding what I was told, but according to my last vet (before the one I have now) most dogs are intolerant of chocolate, like an allaergy, but a few are immune, so part of the problem is people having a dog that can tolerate chocolate and then expecting all dogs to be equally tolerant.

    Either way, my dog only gets the people food she occasionally snitches, naughty girl!
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