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Thread: Clueless about my dog

  1. #1
    Elite Member Blackberry's Avatar
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    Default Clueless about my dog

    I have a 4 years old mixed-breed dog who I found in the street when he was a puppy and because no one wanted him, he stayed. Basically, I never really wanted him, I already have two older dogs. I just couldn't let him off to the street again. He's here for about 4 years and you would expect a dog to become domesticated right? Well, he does not! I mean, he runs away at every chance he's got and everytime I try to call him he just runs away from me! He takes stuff from the dining table and chews or just hides them, whenever there's food on the table and we're not watching, he's eating it. He's just really disturbed! I mean, he's totally fucked up.

    I tried to give him away but nobody wants him and I tried to give him away to a kennel and even offered them donation for it but they said there's no place. They won't take him because right now he's got a home and they need a space for dogs sraight from the street and I totally understand it.

    He's like a wild dog who needs to run in the fields, caged in a house. I don't think he's even trainable because he doesn't even listen to his own owners! I know you can't really give me solution, I just want to share.

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    Elite Member moomies's Avatar
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    You trained this dog just like you did with your other 2 dogs? Have you tried obedience training? You can go take a class with your dog or something. Maybe you just need to be more strict with this dog, it depends on the dog's personality.

    If you think it's crazy, you ain't seen a thing. Just wait until we're goin down in flames.

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    Elite Member pinklilycat's Avatar
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    Aww, poor pooch Perhaps he senses that he's not really wanted and so he misbehaves for more attention?
    Curiouser and curiouser...

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    ^^^ sad.

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    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
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    IF he grew up that way, he's already got it in him. ALso, depending on the mix he is he might have some strong roaming/herding instincts. You gotta break him with obedience school.
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

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    Elite Member moomies's Avatar
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    IMO, almost any dog is trainable. Maybe this one just needs some professional help, more help than others. I'd suggest consulting a professional trainer for advice or taking an obedience training. I would hate to give away a pet I owned for 4 yrs.

    If you think it's crazy, you ain't seen a thing. Just wait until we're goin down in flames.

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    The hiding thing is canine instinct, saving stuff "for a rainy day." I had this happen to me with a VERY expensive purebred golden, we sold him for 50 bucks to a guy with a chicken ranch. That's where he needed to be. Long story. He was untrainable, we tried 2 different schools and the guy came and said, look he's unhappy here (backyard boring, he was raised on a hillside in the country for the first 5 mos. of his life). I agree with Grimm, you gotta break him. It will take a lot of time and effort. I hope you think he's worth it. He's the Beta dog in the house so it's hard for him to adjust I would think. Plus, like Grimm said it's the way he was for how long? on the streets. You were kind to take him in, best of luck. I think you can do it!

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    Elite Member Blackberry's Avatar
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    ^ Don't get me wrong, we don't alienate him. I think we even spoil him more than the others becuase he's young, kind of the silly little puppy. Overall, I love him. He's been with us since he was a puppy. I will give the training thing a second thought.

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    Elite Member Tenaj's Avatar
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    My family took in a stray many years ago when I was a kid. We found him, contacted the police and local kennels. No one wanted him, so "Sam" came to stay with us.

    He had the same issues with food - Give him his food he would swallow it straight away, Leave a sandwich on a plate - whoosh - gone! He was conditioned to eat what he could when he could for fear of not knowing where his next meal would come from. He was a lovely dog. We had him for 17 years. RIP Sam.

    Try the training but don't expect complete miracles. Be happy you've taken this lucky dog under your wing, you never know where he'd be without your love.

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    Training any dog involves being consistant, firm and patient. There is no such thing as an 'untrainable' dog, although some are easier to train than others. You have to be willing to commit a lot of time and effort to this - they can't guess what is and isn't acceptable behaviour. Dogs are pack animals and need a Leader and that's you and if some tough love is required then you have to do it. Otherwise this dog will continue to run circles around you because it knows it can. Consult a professional trainer, listen to the advice and follow through with it for as long as it takes.
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    Elite Member Blackberry's Avatar
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    He was conditioned to eat what he could when he could for fear of not knowing where his next meal would come from.
    That's the most logical thing I've heard about his eating our food issues. I found him when he was a least a month old and I also found another puppy with him, a girl, probably the same age as he was. I gave her away to a friend of mine and she says she also takes food from the dining table. Maybe something happend to them on the street, making them develop this "eat whatever you can" instinct. Damn, and I yelled at that poor little pooch.

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    Elite Member Tenaj's Avatar
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    We found Sam after Christmas - he was a puppy too. Abandoned. He had bruises and cuts. It seems he was an unwanted Christmas present that was treated poorly. He had an unexplainable fear of anyone wearing glasses also. I don't know what happened to him before we took the poor boy in.

    The greedy eating continued all the way through his life, we'd tell him off, and oh yes he knew it was wrong! but he would just eat everything he could find. I don't know what advice to give really. We took him to training classes and he was well behaved in regards to everything else, just this fixation with food stuck with him. I'm not saying you can't change him - just saying we never managed it with Sam.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackberry View Post
    ^ Don't get me wrong, we don't alienate him. I think we even spoil him more than the others because he's young, kind of the silly little puppy. Overall, I love him. He's been with us since he was a puppy. I will give the training thing a second thought.
    Oh, I wasn't saying you're alienating him... it's just that he's lowest on the totem pole in the house according to dog brain, and since you say he's a little spoiled, he's confused about how he should behave. The spoiling is fine as long as he knows what is expected of him and does it.

    The training is tough when they're older, but it can be done. We first tried this excellent lady who held classes in the city park. No luck at all.

    Then we tried this expensive training with this excellent guy who'd been in the business for years, and had a great reputation. He was fantastic. He made home visits along with the small group training (limit of 3), and he had that dog just doing every little thing he commanded. It was amazing. But the dog didn't like being confined in our backyard and we made crucial mistakes, and he wasn't bonding with us (blank eyes). One mistake was some dumbass told us to pour more water into the holes he dug. HELL-lo? Not. It makes it worse! He was a flippin' hunting dog! Anyway, he was a lost cause and we had gotten schnookered by the breeder so there was nothing to do but cut our losses and send him to the guy's chicken farm running loose without a collar. (Yup )

    Anyway, in your case I think you have an excellent chance for success because he's been with you a long time and there's a bond there, and he knows he has a place in the home, however lowly according to dog pecking order. The good trainings are expensive, but worth it because a disciplined, orderly dog is a happy dog. And a happy, well-behaved dog makes a happy household.

    OK Now I want another dog!
    (My precious little girl got killed 4 yrs ago by a car after breaking away from a walker.)

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    Elite Member louiswinthorpe111's Avatar
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    My yellow lab will be 12 years old this summer. She still takes food off the table if no one's looking. She'll sit by my kids, even when they were babies, and if one has a hot dog or a sandwich in their hand and they weren't paying attention, she'd slip that hot dog out of their hand and eat it but the time they look down and even notice it's gone. When people come over, she will eat all the food in her dog bowl, like the visitor may eat it if she doesn't.

    When she was younger, she used to break out and run. I'd call her name, she'd sit there and stare at me. If I took one step toward her, she'd take one step back. If I took I step back, she'd take a step forward. For her, she just wanted to run, so we'd take her to an open place and just let her run. When she got tired, she came back and we went home. One day, during a standoff, I was preggers and ready to pop and didn't feel like taking her anywhere, I had to back the car our of the garage, open the door so she thought she was going somewhere, pulled back in the garage and shut the door. She refused to get out of the car. She sat in the car in a dark garage for at least an hour.

    My dog was not a stray, we got her from a family we knew at 5 weeks old and she was extremely babied. She had no training.

    Now, she still has some pep, still eats all her dog food when we have visitors, and after we went to bed Tues night, she got my boys' gummi bears off the table and ate the whole bag. She doesn't take off any more now. She's too old. Although, she now checks all the planks in the wooden fence, and if she finds a loose one, she sandwiches her way through it and tours the neighborhood. Neighbors will call to tell us Bailey's out. She comes back when I see her across the street and call her name. She's just too old to put up a fight anymore.

    It would be very hard for me to give up a pet I've had for 4 years. This just may be her personality.

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    Elite Member Blackberry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by louiswinthorpe111 View Post
    For her, she just wanted to run, so we'd take her to an open place and just let her run. When she got tired, she came back and we went home.
    My dad took him to the beach and walked him couple of times with a leash to make him tired and then took the leash off so the pooch could run a bit. Oh, he ran alright. Everytime my dad tried to grab him, he would run away. At one point, my dad just left him there and drove away. I guess that dog likes us after all and he started chasing the car, run really fast so my dad pulled over and tired to call him, catch him or even let him into the car by his own but yet he runs away. Then he calls me, saying my dog got crazy and he needs my help to catch him. I came over, he runs more. My dad goes back to the beach and comes back with a net (!). Then he sat on a bench, looking like he doesn't care about the dog, the dog comes over just a little bit, then my dad throws the net on him and catches him.

    That is why we can't just let him run in the park because he won't come back even when he's tired. Until we manage to catch him, then it's wild wild west.

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