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Thread: Has anyone's dog had CCL surgery?

  1. #1
    Elite Member dksnj's Avatar
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    Default Has anyone's dog had CCL surgery?

    So my pup tore his CCL (ACL in human's) in both knees. He is scheduled for bilateral TPLO surgery next Friday. Because we are getting both knees done at the same time the recovery should be fun

    Curious if anyone else had this surgery done for their dog and offer any hints/suggestions. The maintenance guy at work has offered to make a sling for me to use when I need to take him outside to 'do his business', which is awesome. I've been using the towel/wheelbarrow trick for the last week.
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    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    I haven't done it with my dog, but my I've had two family members do it for their dogs. Neither of them did both legs at the same time, but the recovery at home was crucial. The vet recommended that they get an orthopedic foam-type bed. No stairs unless there isn't a choice and if they have to use the stairs, keep it to a minimum. Both dogs I know had to use stairs to go to the bathroom outside, but they were kept to single story living in the houses. Also, be careful with hard surface floors, especially when they try to stand from a laying position. Be careful of them jumping on and off furniture. My aunts dog had to be kept out of the bedroom for a while (which was made easier by a babygate at the foot of the stairs) because she slept on the bed and jumping up and down, onto hardwood floors, was a no-no.

    I think they both used a sling for the first couple of days to help to go up and down stairs. One thing they both said is to make sure you keep up with the painkillers. they are in a lot of pain and discomfort for a few days

    Big hugs to you and your pooch
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    Elite Member CornFlakegrl's Avatar
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    My first rot had this done twice (each leg but done separately) and my second rot had one knee done. Brace yourself for the nasty looking incision / stitches on the shaved legs of your furbaby. I mean it's only nasty because it's your beloved. But it is some Frankstein looking shit.

    I'm kind of surprised they are doing 2 at once, not sure how your pooch is supposed to get around as typically they are non weight bearing for a least a week or more and then they advance to "toe touch" walk. The sling sounds critical for at least a little while.

    I always, always, always crated my dogs after surgery. I took no chances they would jump or run. The first couple of days they are so stoned they don't move much anyway but the crate kept them contained throughout their recovery. I mean obviously they were let out for meals, potty time and some snuggles. But lots of crate time. They sleep so it was never an issue.

    If memory serves, they are moving around much better pretty quickly. If you have access to a pool for dogs, it's a good therapy once the stitches are out. It will be important after initial recovery to build up muscle strength and reduce arthritis by keeping those joints moving. We did gentle mobility stuff once stitches were out but before hard core rehab.

    Good luck! let us know how it goes. They look so pathetic afterward but really if all goes well, they recover fairly quickly. Think about 2 weeks of total restrictions and quiet and then gradual increase in activity as tolerated by the dog. No off leash or hardcore runs for quite some though. Months.
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    Elite Member lindsaywhit's Avatar
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    Yes, good luck - to both of you, lol!
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  5. #5
    czb
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    we had it done on a few years ago.

    we walk/hike everywhere, including stone staircases (>200 steps) built into hills so we wanted to make sure our dog was fully rehabbed before she could do any real hiking.

    first surgery was done by the 'premier' guy in town, kind of flashy, rock star boarded vet surgeon. the surgery went ok, but our dog did not do well under rock star's pain management protocol (which included an epidural). yes, a dog epidural. other knee blew out 2 months later, did the surgery with a different boarded vet surgeon with a diff pain management protocol (and cost 1300 less). dog did much, much better.

    so my advice is this:

    1) minimize how much your dog moves, especially the first week
    2) stay on top of pain. hard to tell pain in a dog, but panting and general sadness or sad eyes is how i could see it. they will give you doggie narcs including tramadol and rimadyl. stay on it. your dog will not become an addict but this will help your dog recover.
    3) start out with slow walks that are short, as soon as the vet allows. our vet had a very detailed schedule of allowed exercise so hopefully yours will also provide that.
    4) they sent us home with a dog harness. it looks like a coat with a handle on top (lies parallel with spine). your dog should wear that, then you can pick up the hind legs to assist it walking.

    it's a miserable 4 weeks, but now our dog is fine. was back hiking in a few months.

    good luck!
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  6. #6
    Elite Member dksnj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KrisNine View Post
    I haven't done it with my dog, but my I've had two family members do it for their dogs. Neither of them did both legs at the same time, but the recovery at home was crucial. The vet recommended that they get an orthopedic foam-type bed. No stairs unless there isn't a choice and if they have to use the stairs, keep it to a minimum. Both dogs I know had to use stairs to go to the bathroom outside, but they were kept to single story living in the houses. Also, be careful with hard surface floors, especially when they try to stand from a laying position. Be careful of them jumping on and off furniture. My aunts dog had to be kept out of the bedroom for a while (which was made easier by a babygate at the foot of the stairs) because she slept on the bed and jumping up and down, onto hardwood floors, was a no-no.

    I think they both used a sling for the first couple of days to help to go up and down stairs. One thing they both said is to make sure you keep up with the painkillers. they are in a lot of pain and discomfort for a few days

    Big hugs to you and your pooch
    Thanks. I plan on restricting him to a small space in the den downstairs - which is carpeted. I do have a crate, but with the 'cone of shame' it will be hard for him to get in/out/sleep, I'll also block him from going on the couch. I do have 3 deck stairs, so I'll definitely be using the sling. He's currently on Rimadyl and Tramadol which is working great for him.

    I'm fortunate enough I can take vacation/work from home for the two weeks following his surgery.

    Thanks for the advice. I'll probably buy some runners so it is easier for him to make his way through the living room and kitchen to the back door.
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  7. #7
    Elite Member dksnj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CornFlakegrl View Post
    My first rot had this done twice (each leg but done separately) and my second rot had one knee done. Brace yourself for the nasty looking incision / stitches on the shaved legs of your furbaby. I mean it's only nasty because it's your beloved. But it is some Frankstein looking shit.

    I'm kind of surprised they are doing 2 at once, not sure how your pooch is supposed to get around as typically they are non weight bearing for a least a week or more and then they advance to "toe touch" walk. The sling sounds critical for at least a little while.

    I always, always, always crated my dogs after surgery. I took no chances they would jump or run. The first couple of days they are so stoned they don't move much anyway but the crate kept them contained throughout their recovery. I mean obviously they were let out for meals, potty time and some snuggles. But lots of crate time. They sleep so it was never an issue.

    If memory serves, they are moving around much better pretty quickly. If you have access to a pool for dogs, it's a good therapy once the stitches are out. It will be important after initial recovery to build up muscle strength and reduce arthritis by keeping those joints moving. We did gentle mobility stuff once stitches were out but before hard core rehab.

    Good luck! let us know how it goes. They look so pathetic afterward but really if all goes well, they recover fairly quickly. Think about 2 weeks of total restrictions and quiet and then gradual increase in activity as tolerated by the dog. No off leash or hardcore runs for quite some though. Months.
    How did you crate them with the cone on? The vet said it is imperative he doesn't lick the incisions.

    She suggested the bilateral TPLO since both his legs have tears and it would be just as painful, cumbersome if one knee was done and he had to use his other bad knee to put the weight on...he's 74 lbs so it would be quite a bit of weight on an already torn ccl.
    Vera Donovan: (Dolores Claiborne) : Sometimes you have to be a high-riding bitch to survive. Sometimes being a bitch is all a woman has to hold onto.

  8. #8
    Elite Member dksnj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by czb View Post
    we had it done on a few years ago.

    we walk/hike everywhere, including stone staircases (>200 steps) built into hills so we wanted to make sure our dog was fully rehabbed before she could do any real hiking.

    first surgery was done by the 'premier' guy in town, kind of flashy, rock star boarded vet surgeon. the surgery went ok, but our dog did not do well under rock star's pain management protocol (which included an epidural). yes, a dog epidural. other knee blew out 2 months later, did the surgery with a different boarded vet surgeon with a diff pain management protocol (and cost 1300 less). dog did much, much better.

    so my advice is this:

    1) minimize how much your dog moves, especially the first week
    2) stay on top of pain. hard to tell pain in a dog, but panting and general sadness or sad eyes is how i could see it. they will give you doggie narcs including tramadol and rimadyl. stay on it. your dog will not become an addict but this will help your dog recover.
    3) start out with slow walks that are short, as soon as the vet allows. our vet had a very detailed schedule of allowed exercise so hopefully yours will also provide that.
    4) they sent us home with a dog harness. it looks like a coat with a handle on top (lies parallel with spine). your dog should wear that, then you can pick up the hind legs to assist it walking.

    it's a miserable 4 weeks, but now our dog is fine. was back hiking in a few months.

    good luck!
    Thanks - he is currently on Rimadyl and Tramadol for the pain, so will most likely continue that after the surgery.
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  9. #9
    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
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    All the best for your fur baby!
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  10. #10
    Elite Member CornFlakegrl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dksnj View Post
    How did you crate them with the cone on? The vet said it is imperative he doesn't lick the incisions.

    She suggested the bilateral TPLO since both his legs have tears and it would be just as painful, cumbersome if one knee was done and he had to use his other bad knee to put the weight on...he's 74 lbs so it would be quite a bit of weight on an already torn ccl.
    I was never given a cone for the first dog / 2 surgeries. She never really bothered with the stitches. Second dog they gave me a collar that kept her from being able to lower her chin enough to lick. I don't think I ever saw her try. Maybe see if you can get the collar instead. Way less cumbersome.

    Crating is up to you of course, and your animal. My dogs? Every single time they heard any kind of noise they'd be up, wanting to investigate. I did not want them up and down. So crate it was. IDK with 2 legs at the same time, perhaps your dog won't even bother.
    if you're so incensed that you can't fly your penis in public take it up with your state, arrange a nude protest, go and be the rosa parks of cocks or something - witchcurlgirl

  11. #11
    Elite Member dksnj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CornFlakegrl View Post
    I was never given a cone for the first dog / 2 surgeries. She never really bothered with the stitches. Second dog they gave me a collar that kept her from being able to lower her chin enough to lick. I don't think I ever saw her try. Maybe see if you can get the collar instead. Way less cumbersome.

    Crating is up to you of course, and your animal. My dogs? Every single time they heard any kind of noise they'd be up, wanting to investigate. I did not want them up and down. So crate it was. IDK with 2 legs at the same time, perhaps your dog won't even bother.
    Thanks, he is a bit short and stocky so maybe the neck collar may work instead of the elizabethan collar. I crate him at night now so he stays off his legs as much as possible. He seems to like the crate as he will go in it during the day - I leave the door to it open.

    Thanks everyone for all the advice
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  12. #12
    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    We did a neck collar on our dog when she had surgery. it was a inflatable deal and it kept her from getting at the stitches on her side, but wouldn't have helped with anything further down. She was a big lab. I think it made her a lot more comfortable than the typical e-collar.

  13. #13
    Elite Member dksnj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KrisNine View Post
    We did a neck collar on our dog when she had surgery. it was a inflatable deal and it kept her from getting at the stitches on her side, but wouldn't have helped with anything further down. She was a big lab. I think it made her a lot more comfortable than the typical e-collar.
    Hopefully I can find something in between neck collar and the hard plastic e-collar
    Vera Donovan: (Dolores Claiborne) : Sometimes you have to be a high-riding bitch to survive. Sometimes being a bitch is all a woman has to hold onto.

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