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Thread: My cat is driving me crazy with puking!!

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    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    Default My cat is driving me crazy with puking!!

    Ok, so my older rescue cat is driving me crazy. He's always puking. His health seems to be fine otherwise and the vet doesn't have any answers. He just turned 11 and we haven't had him for a year yet, but I'm losing my mind with him. It seems to be that he's gorging himself on food. He'll plow through half of his food and throw it up pretty much while he's eating and then go right back to eating. There are no obstructions, his blood was normal, he's playful, uses his litter box, etc.

    We've tried wet food and dry food. Cheap food and very expensive food. Food for hairballs and sensitive stomachs. Grain and grain free. He'll even puke up treats when I give them to him because he'll eat them so fast. We've even tried some suggestions online and have started feeding him on large trays and large paper plates where the kibble is spread out and he has to work around the surface to eat. It works half the time.

    This isn't my first cat. I've had 9 cats in my life time, with all sorts of issues, but this is a new one to me.

    HELP!

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    fgg
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    sorry your cat is having troubles!

    not sure if they have anything like this for cats but there are food mats and other products for dogs that make them work for the food, not just spread out on a plate. maybe try one of those?

    ETA:

    https://www.chewy.com/northmate-catc...Q&gclsrc=aw.ds
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    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    ^^Oh, I like that. It seems like it's a lot of work, but that seems to be what they like. And, if it keeps me from cleaning up five piles of puke in the morning, I'm in!

    Thanks.

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    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    Our Turkish Angora did that. Gorgeous cat, and incredibly loving, but VERY high strung. Would eat dry food almost without chewing and then puke it up in almost the form that it was going down. No problem with her teeth either. The only upside was that it was very easy to clean up.

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    Elite Member Brah's Avatar
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    My cat is like that. Gorges himself on food and then pukes iy right back up. What works for me is to feed him twice a day, and I feed him by placing a few kibble pieces down at a time and waiting a minute before giving him the next few bits, until the whole serving amount is done. I'm forcing him to take his time eating then, and he never pukes when I do it that way.

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    Elite Member faithanne's Avatar
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    Do you brush him? Mine stop throwing up after a good brush, or else they'll eat a bit of grass and throw that up straight after, but then they're fine.
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    Elite Member Neptunia's Avatar
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    If you cat has been checked for illnesses such as thyroid, kidney and allergies issues, then your cat might have, "scarf and barf" which some rescue cats have. A cat that's been abandoned or never had a reliable food source might feel they're not going to get another meal so they eat everything they see and quickly. You might notice the cat vomit has undigested food in it, that's because the cat is eating so quickly he's not even chewing the food well, just scarfing it down.
    The plate option is great, it's harder to eat more than one kibble piece if you can't dive your face in a bowl, option two would be a slow feed cat bowl (or the mat mentioned above which is great too) that requires the cat to work for each piece of food and most importantly they will chew the one piece before getting another.
    We have a resident cat at our practice with this issue. She's fed kibble (she vomits up canned food) on a plate, one layer thick and only a tablespoon at a time. She eats a few times a day and it seems to keep her in check. She was left at the doorstep of our practice as a kitten with fleas, worms and a broken leg, she was malnourished too and even though she has a food source everyday for the past two years, that scarf and barf behavior has never left her. There are medications for OCD behavior if there are other issues such as excessive licking where there are fur patches licked off or pacing, vocalizing or even chewing on fabric but if the eating behavior can be corrected with a different approach to feeding that would be better for everyone. Good Luck!
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    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neptunia View Post
    If you cat has been checked for illnesses such as thyroid, kidney and allergies issues, then your cat might have, "scarf and barf" which some rescue cats have. A cat that's been abandoned or never had a reliable food source might feel they're not going to get another meal so they eat everything they see and quickly.
    Ours was a rescue cat. We even joked that she was like a teenage mom cat because when the shelter took her in she was pregnant. The shelter thought she was so adoptable, though, that they gave her some kind of abortion before they put her up for adoption.

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    Elite Member Brookie's Avatar
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    I have a puker too - I feed her grain-free food. Waaaaaay less mess.
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    Elite Member Neptunia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MohandasKGanja View Post
    Ours was a rescue cat. We even joked that she was like a teenage mom cat because when the shelter took her in she was pregnant. The shelter thought she was so adoptable, though, that they gave her some kind of abortion before they put her up for adoption.
    Shelters will pregnant spay, as unpleasant as that is to say but with the overcrowding it's necessary. After going through all that I'm glad she found a good, loving home with your family.
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    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MohandasKGanja View Post
    Our Turkish Angora did that. Gorgeous cat, and incredibly loving, but VERY high strung. Would eat dry food almost without chewing and then puke it up in almost the form that it was going down. No problem with her teeth either. The only upside was that it was very easy to clean up.
    That's exactly what's happening here. He barely chews and the food is practically just pile of semi-softened kibble. It's easy to clean, most of the time. If he happens to hit the carpet, then it's a pain. Plus, he just yaks wherever he happens to be. So, he's puked on the sofa.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brah View Post
    My cat is like that. Gorges himself on food and then pukes iy right back up. What works for me is to feed him twice a day, and I feed him by placing a few kibble pieces down at a time and waiting a minute before giving him the next few bits, until the whole serving amount is done. I'm forcing him to take his time eating then, and he never pukes when I do it that way.
    I've tried that, but then no one in the house can sleep. He's up looking for food during the night.

    Quote Originally Posted by faithanne View Post
    Do you brush him? Mine stop throwing up after a good brush, or else they'll eat a bit of grass and throw that up straight after, but then they're fine.
    I do, but not regularly. I'll try it. Funny thing is, he barely has hairball vomits. It's mostly the food.

    Quote Originally Posted by Neptunia View Post
    If you cat has been checked for illnesses such as thyroid, kidney and allergies issues, then your cat might have, "scarf and barf" which some rescue cats have. A cat that's been abandoned or never had a reliable food source might feel they're not going to get another meal so they eat everything they see and quickly. You might notice the cat vomit has undigested food in it, that's because the cat is eating so quickly he's not even chewing the food well, just scarfing it down.
    The plate option is great, it's harder to eat more than one kibble piece if you can't dive your face in a bowl, option two would be a slow feed cat bowl (or the mat mentioned above which is great too) that requires the cat to work for each piece of food and most importantly they will chew the one piece before getting another.
    We have a resident cat at our practice with this issue. She's fed kibble (she vomits up canned food) on a plate, one layer thick and only a tablespoon at a time. She eats a few times a day and it seems to keep her in check. She was left at the doorstep of our practice as a kitten with fleas, worms and a broken leg, she was malnourished too and even though she has a food source everyday for the past two years, that scarf and barf behavior has never left her. There are medications for OCD behavior if there are other issues such as excessive licking where there are fur patches licked off or pacing, vocalizing or even chewing on fabric but if the eating behavior can be corrected with a different approach to feeding that would be better for everyone. Good Luck!
    I think it's the scarf and barf. He was at the rescue for two years. The volunteers at this rescue were known as these little old ladies that couldn't resist the begging cats So, he pretty much ate all day long. He was almost 22 pounds when we got him. At first, I would put his food into his bowl and he would lay in front of it, with his arms around it, and just eat. I would always leave the bowl full because that's what I've always done with my cats. Then, when I had to somewhat limit his food intake, I think the scarf and barf started. Now, it doesn't matter what I do.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brookie View Post
    I have a puker too - I feed her grain-free food. Waaaaaay less mess.
    The grain and dye free is much better. Less mess and staining.

    Thanks for all of the advice guys!

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    A*O
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    Try giving him a very small amount several times a day. If he's puking up as soon as he's eaten he's still hungry so it's a vicious cycle. Dry food/kibble too, makes portion control easier and less revolting/smelly to clear up.
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    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by A*O View Post
    Try giving him a very small amount several times a day. If he's puking up as soon as he's eaten he's still hungry so it's a vicious cycle. Dry food/kibble too, makes portion control easier and less revolting/smelly to clear up.
    A*O!!! Yeah, that's what we're trying to do. He will often shovel the food down and puke within minutes, often right at his dish. Of course, he then will return to eating right away. It is indeed a vicious cycle. The vet told us that often times, when the cat pukes, he'll want to drink, and sometimes they'll drink more than they would normally drink because the body is telling them to rehydrate after puking, which also makes it worse.

    I think we're going to try the ice cube tray approach, before buying the puzzle feeder. The idea is to put little amounts of kibble in the individual cube compartments, making the cat have to work at getting it out.

    I've had to switch to all dry food because of the vomiting. the vet even mentioned to us to slightly moisten the food with water before serving.

    Pain in the ass cat!

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    I agree to feed your cat several times a day. If I'm late putting the food out in the morning, my Seal Point will eat so fast, then throw it up. Let us know how it goes. Sorry for you and your cat. I feel your pain.

    Edit: Try separating the food and water bowls if they aren't already. My cats has their water bowls in the living room. One food bowl is in our bed room, and another in the hall way. I have to separate my cats foods. My Russian Blue has to eat mostly soft food because she rarely drinks, and has a weight problem. They never liked their water bowl right beside their food.
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    Elite Member Sassiness's Avatar
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    puzzle feeders, limited feedings.

    So what if he's roaming around whinging for food? He'll quickly learn that he gets fed at regular intervals. I have to do this with mine because Alice has IBS - she got really sick recently, and was vomiting all the time because her stomach was so inflamed. She's now on Ziwipeak, a meat-only food. It's expensive but it's cheaper than long stays at the vets! And it's making her much happier and healthier.

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