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Thread: Adopting another kitty

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    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    Default Adopting another kitty

    We're looking at adopting another kitty. Our old guy is coming up on 15 and he's lonely. His littermate died Christmas of 2009 and he lost two other members of his kitty cat family in May and October of 2009. He also went through us losing our dog Josie, adding our dog Toby and the big addition of our daughter, all in 2010. He tries to cuddle and snuggle with the dog, me, my SO and the kid. I just feel bad for him. He spent the majority of his life with another cat.

    He's declawed (he came to me that way) and I'm wondering if that's going to be an issue. Since we want to adopt an older kitty (not old, just not a kitten) do we need to look for a declawed kitty? I know the dog and kid are used to having a kitty that can't claw them, but I'm worried for my kitty. Suggestions??

    Also, our vet says our kitty is very healthy and we should plan on having him around for a while.

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    Elite Member MmeVertigina's Avatar
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    I think it is so sweet how loving you are toward your cat. I would try to match him up with another cat (maybe female would be best, so they won't compete?) with a similar temperament. I know that most places that do cat adoptions will tell you a bit about the personality of the pet you are taking home, even places like Pet Smart are good about this. I hope you find him a nice little pal.
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    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
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    Go look in the shelters. You will know him when you find him...
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    Elite Member faithanne's Avatar
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    Maybe ask at your local shelter for a very docile passive cat that won't be a threat to your kitty and will be a cuddle mate instead.
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    Elite Member Trixie's Avatar
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    I'm guessing your local no-kill shelters have tons of adult cats. The last time I adopted, I looked at the shelter's website, which had pics and bios on available cats. That way you can see which ones might fit into your family, i.e., good with other cats, kids, dogs, and have a list of the ones you'd like to meet. I don't really know if the claws thing would be an issue--all my cats have theirs and no matter what, there will be a period of adjustment and some spats but none of mine have ever done any major damage to each other. It would probably be nice to find a no-claws kitty so the playing field is level, but I don't think it's mandatory.
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    Elite Member Brookie's Avatar
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    Yeah, there are plenty of Facebook pages too who have adoptable cats in your area. PetSmart has events locally around the country where they host adoption events from local shelters.

    I recently adopted two kittens, Rebel (female) and Leo (male). They're cute together. So many kittens need homes. Kris, I think your guy will be happy with just about whoever you bring home.
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    Silver Member albatross's Avatar
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    I don't think you have to get another declawed cat. I've had both, and right now I have one of each, and it's never been a problem. They've been together for over 5 years now, and they've never harmed each other. I think it's more important to get a good match in personalities than it is to worry about claws vs. no claws.

    In my experience, shelters will usually tell you what they know about the cat's interaction with other animals and children. Good shelters won't let the animals go into homes that aren't a fit.
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    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MmeVertigina View Post
    I think it is so sweet how loving you are toward your cat. I would try to match him up with another cat (maybe female would be best, so they won't compete?) with a similar temperament. I know that most places that do cat adoptions will tell you a bit about the personality of the pet you are taking home, even places like Pet Smart are good about this. I hope you find him a nice little pal.
    Thank you He's honestly the sweetest cat I have ever been around. He's so docile and loving. Everyone, even people that aren't cat people want to take him. We've been looking at PetSmart. They seem to be really good.

    Quote Originally Posted by McJag View Post
    Go look in the shelters. You will know him when you find him...
    That is true. Knowing me, my heart will know when we find about four

    Quote Originally Posted by faithanne View Post
    Maybe ask at your local shelter for a very docile passive cat that won't be a threat to your kitty and will be a cuddle mate instead.
    That's what we'll need to do. He's extremely docile. I don't mind a little spunky, just not one that's going to upset him too much.

    Quote Originally Posted by Trixie View Post
    I'm guessing your local no-kill shelters have tons of adult cats. The last time I adopted, I looked at the shelter's website, which had pics and bios on available cats. That way you can see which ones might fit into your family, i.e., good with other cats, kids, dogs, and have a list of the ones you'd like to meet. I don't really know if the claws thing would be an issue--all my cats have theirs and no matter what, there will be a period of adjustment and some spats but none of mine have ever done any major damage to each other. It would probably be nice to find a no-claws kitty so the playing field is level, but I don't think it's mandatory.
    I like that the shelters and rescue groups offer up the bio's on the kitties. The poor cat we get will have a large order to fill. Cat friendly, kid friendly and dog friendly Our kitty has been part of a group that had claws. I had my three cats when my SO and I met. They all had claws. My SO had his two and both were declawed. So, he's been around claws. I guess I'm worried about his age.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brookie View Post
    Yeah, there are plenty of Facebook pages too who have adoptable cats in your area. PetSmart has events locally around the country where they host adoption events from local shelters.

    I recently adopted two kittens, Rebel (female) and Leo (male). They're cute together. So many kittens need homes. Kris, I think your guy will be happy with just about whoever you bring home.
    I love kittens. I worry about bringing a tiny kitten into a house with a 2.5 year old and a 90lb dog. Kittens are amazing. If we do a kitten, we'd probably do an older cat and a kitten. Oh, boy. What am I getting into???

    Quote Originally Posted by albatross View Post
    I don't think you have to get another declawed cat. I've had both, and right now I have one of each, and it's never been a problem. They've been together for over 5 years now, and they've never harmed each other. I think it's more important to get a good match in personalities than it is to worry about claws vs. no claws.

    In my experience, shelters will usually tell you what they know about the cat's interaction with other animals and children. Good shelters won't let the animals go into homes that aren't a fit.
    Thank you. I think we'll search for a kitty and look for no claws, but we won't turn down a good fit with claws (since he's been around claws). One of our rescue groups suggested that we take a kitty on a foster basis. I know me, even if it wasn't a good fit, I would end up keeping him. I've never given an animal back or gotten rid of an animal in my entire life.

    Thanks for all the great advice, everyone.
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    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
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    We want to hear all about it!
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    Elite Member yanna's Avatar
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    Yeah, let us know how it all turns out. And post pics!
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    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    I'll be sure to let you guys know what we do We might go look tomorrow.
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    We adopted IttyBit from Petsmart, and honestly I don't know if I will ever adopt from there again. The first shit he took at our house had blood in it, which in my mind translates into he was pooping blood at the foster's house (it was a lot of blood too, so it was easy to see). After taking him to the vet three times, and finding out he had a tapeworm infestation, a raging bacterial infection in his gut, 2 courses of antibiotics, put on specialty food, we kind of wish they paid attention to his poop or disclosed the fact that he had gut problems. He's a great cat, but his gut is not so sweet.

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    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
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    I think it wise to take a newly adoped pet straight to the vet-before going home. You never know. My vet flatly objected to my dog being taken to the shelter to "meet" his new brother. He saw the new guy first and signed off on him,just in case he had something that could be passed on. He turned out in oerfect health,but you have to protect your old pet (and human family) first. Just FYI.
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    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoogsBun View Post
    We adopted IttyBit from Petsmart, and honestly I don't know if I will ever adopt from there again. The first shit he took at our house had blood in it, which in my mind translates into he was pooping blood at the foster's house (it was a lot of blood too, so it was easy to see). After taking him to the vet three times, and finding out he had a tapeworm infestation, a raging bacterial infection in his gut, 2 courses of antibiotics, put on specialty food, we kind of wish they paid attention to his poop or disclosed the fact that he had gut problems. He's a great cat, but his gut is not so sweet.
    That's terrible. I'll be sure to keep that in mind. My first dog, my dearly departed Josie, was a Valentines Day gift from my old boyfriend. He bought her from this little "boutique" pet store. I HATE pet stores but I had no clue what he was planning on doing. Long story short, I wouldn't have traded her for anything in the world, even though I suspect she came from a horrible puppy mill. She had a nasty stomach problem and kennel cough. I took her to the vet and told the store what was going on. They told me to return her and I'd get another one. Seriously, that was their answer. Fuckers.

    Quote Originally Posted by McJag View Post
    I think it wise to take a newly adoped pet straight to the vet-before going home. You never know. My vet flatly objected to my dog being taken to the shelter to "meet" his new brother. He saw the new guy first and signed off on him,just in case he had something that could be passed on. He turned out in oerfect health,but you have to protect your old pet (and human family) first. Just FYI.
    Good advice. Plus, the pet you meet at the shelter and the pet that you take home and warms up to you at home are very different

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    Silver Member Abbey Normal's Avatar
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    One of the large breed cats may be a good choice. From my limited experience, they are kind of dogs in a cat body, mellow, good snugglers and big enough to not break under the love of an enthusiastic child.
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