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Thread: Killer Whales Trapped in Ice

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    Default Killer Whales Trapped in Ice

    Killer Whales in Hudson Bay have been trapped in by the frozen waters. They are currently seen coming up for air in a small opening.


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    Gold Member dilligaf's Avatar
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    Elite Member mtlebay's Avatar
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    Apparantly there's little hope Little hope for killer whales trapped by ice in Hudson Poor guys.

    Yet, why the eff are Canada's only ice breakers down south?!?!?!
    Go Habs Go!!

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    Elite Member Butterfly's Avatar
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    Now I'm depressed.
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    Can't we drop some juicy, blubbery seal meat on them until things get warmer?

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    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    can't they drug them and airlift them to safety or something?
    I'm open to everything. When you start to criticise the times you live in, your time is over. - Karl Lagerfeld

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    Elite Member Butterfly's Avatar
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    Thumbs up They are free!!!!!!

    Orcas trapped in ice in northern Quebec are free: locals

    Ice floe shifts on Hudson Bay allowed them to move to open water

    Andy Blatchford, Thursday, January 10, 2013 10:34 AM






    MONTREAL - A leader in a northern Quebec village says about a dozen killer whales that were trapped under sea ice appear to have reached safety as the floes shifted on Hudson Bay.

    Tommy Palliser said two hunters from Inukjuak reported Thursday that the waters had opened up around the area where the cornered orcas had been bobbing frantically for air.

    "They confirmed that the whales were no longer there and there was a lot of open water," said Palliser, a business adviser with the regional government.

    The animals' predicament made international headlines and images of the orcas circulated via media around the world.

    Locals say the mammals had been trapped around a single, pickup-truck-sized breathing hole for at least two days.

    Palliser said the winds seemed to shift overnight, pushing the floating ice further away from the shore to open up the water.

    "The wind started to pick up last night from the land, blowing into the bay," he said.

    "The winds certainly make a lot of difference in terms of the ice conditions."


    This video of the whales was uploaded to YouTube by TheKayuk:





    The cornered animals, first seen Tuesday, appeared to have less energy by late Wednesday, Palliser said. There were also fears the hole was shrinking after ice moved toward land and the water continued to freeze over.

    Locals believe the recent sudden drop in temperature caught the orcas off guard, leaving them boxed in under the ice.

    Inukjuak Mayor Peter Inukpuk has said the Department of Fisheries and Oceans informed him that government icebreakers were too far from the area to smash the ice to free the orcas.

    Villagers responded by making plans late Wednesday to launch a daring rescue operation Thursday to buy more time for the gasping killer whales.

    Palliser said locals had agreed to attempt to enlarge the existing breathing hole - and cut a second opening using chainsaws and drills.

    "It's certainly good news - that's good news for the whales," he said.

    "We certainly had our prayers with them last night during our meeting."

    DFO said incidents where marine mammals are trapped by ice are not unusual in the North.

    A veterinarian affiliated with Quebec's marine mammal emergency network says sea ice is known as a natural cause of death for animals like orcas.




    Read it on Global News: Global Montreal | Orcas trapped in ice in northern Quebec are free: locals
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    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    Yeah!!! I just saw this on NBC!!

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    Elite Member ConstanceSpry's Avatar
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    Whew, read the first and third posts and got bummed out, so great to read on to a happy ending.
    'I had to get rid of the kid. The cat was allergic.'

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    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    That's a relief. Can you imagine if Klaus Kinski had gotten hold of them in that vulnerable state?

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    Elite Member mtlebay's Avatar
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    Don't mean to be a Debbie Downer...


    Freed orcas in northern Quebec still face perilous journey

    Killer whales yet to reach open water: marine expert

    MONTREAL – A pod of orca whales escaped a deadly situation in northern Quebec Thursday but they still face a perilous road to safety, according to a leading marine ecologist.

    The 12 killer whales had been trapped under thick layers of ice for days with only a small opening to breathe from. Strong winds cracked portions of the ice apart early Thursday morning, allowing them to swim toward open water along the northeastern edge of the Hudson Bay.

    But despite their greatly improved situation, the orcas aren’t safe yet.

    “Technically, the whales are free but it’s kind of a conditional release,” said Lyne Morisette, a researcher for the St. Lawrence Global Observatory. “The Hudson Bay is covered in ice so until they get into the Hudson Sea or the Northern Atlantic Ocean you can’t say they’re in open water.”

    The whales became stranded Monday after huge sections of ice shifted behind them while they were migrating near Inukjuak, a fishing village along Quebec’s northwestern coast. They took turns breaching a small hole in the ice in a desperate bid to keep breathing.

    Over time, the killer whales began to weaken, with some sustaining cuts from the jagged chunks of ice that coat much of the province’s northern coastline.

    “It was getting pretty bad. One of the smaller whales was sick and the others were getting weaker,” said Johnny Williams, Inukjuak’s city manager. “You could see their skin start to burn from the ice. People were worried.”

    About 25 km of ice separated the group from more open waters, causing locals to wonder if an icebreaking ship would be needed to clear a path for the killer whales. Experts said that under the conditions they faced near Inukjuak, it was only a matter of time before the orcas would die a slow, painful death.

    “The whales could die from exhaustion or they will suffocate,” Morissette said on Wednesday. “There’s not much time for action ... people have a tendency to think an ice breaker can be dispatched at the drop of a hat but that’s just not the case. It takes time and it costs a lot of money, two factors that work against the whales.”

    The Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada flew a team of scientists into the area Monday morning to monitor the situation. Local airline Air Inuit volunteered one of their planes to help keep an eye on the whales as they attempt to find their way to open water.

    Williams was on site for most of the ordeal to make sure curious bystanders didn’t wander too close to the orcas. Every morning he would hop on his snowmobile, ride from town along the Hudson Bay’s frigid coastline for about an hour before parking near the trapped animals.

    Because killer whales rarely migrate so far north during the winter, the sighting caused a stir in Inukjuak, a town of about 1,500. Dozens made the trek out to sea to snap photos and see the wild animals up close, as Williams watched nervously.

    “I’m 69 and I never saw anything like that ever,” Williams said. “I was worried about the whales being here in the winter but I was worried sick someone might slip in, make things worse.”


    The whales were spotted by a local hunter on Monday and quickly began an international media sensation after footage of the animals was posted on YouTube Tuesday night.


    Read more: Freed orcas in northern Quebec still face perilous journey
    Go Habs Go!!

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    Gold Member Froogy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly View Post
    Orcas trapped in ice in northern Quebec are free: locals

    Ice floe shifts on Hudson Bay allowed them to move to open water

    Andy Blatchford, Thursday, January 10, 2013 10:34 AM






    MONTREAL - A leader in a northern Quebec village says about a dozen killer whales that were trapped under sea ice appear to have reached safety as the floes shifted on Hudson Bay.

    Tommy Palliser said two hunters from Inukjuak reported Thursday that the waters had opened up around the area where the cornered orcas had been bobbing frantically for air.

    "They confirmed that the whales were no longer there and there was a lot of open water," said Palliser, a business adviser with the regional government.

    The animals' predicament made international headlines and images of the orcas circulated via media around the world.

    Locals say the mammals had been trapped around a single, pickup-truck-sized breathing hole for at least two days.

    Palliser said the winds seemed to shift overnight, pushing the floating ice further away from the shore to open up the water.

    "The wind started to pick up last night from the land, blowing into the bay," he said.

    "The winds certainly make a lot of difference in terms of the ice conditions."


    This video of the whales was uploaded to YouTube by TheKayuk:





    The cornered animals, first seen Tuesday, appeared to have less energy by late Wednesday, Palliser said. There were also fears the hole was shrinking after ice moved toward land and the water continued to freeze over.

    Locals believe the recent sudden drop in temperature caught the orcas off guard, leaving them boxed in under the ice.

    Inukjuak Mayor Peter Inukpuk has said the Department of Fisheries and Oceans informed him that government icebreakers were too far from the area to smash the ice to free the orcas.

    Villagers responded by making plans late Wednesday to launch a daring rescue operation Thursday to buy more time for the gasping killer whales.

    Palliser said locals had agreed to attempt to enlarge the existing breathing hole - and cut a second opening using chainsaws and drills.

    "It's certainly good news - that's good news for the whales," he said.

    "We certainly had our prayers with them last night during our meeting."

    DFO said incidents where marine mammals are trapped by ice are not unusual in the North.

    A veterinarian affiliated with Quebec's marine mammal emergency network says sea ice is known as a natural cause of death for animals like orcas.




    Read it on Global News: Global Montreal | Orcas trapped in ice in northern Quebec are free: locals
    Thankfully, there is good news!

  13. #13
    Elite Member Aella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtlebay View Post
    Don't mean to be a Debbie Downer...


    Freed orcas in northern Quebec still face perilous journey

    Killer whales yet to reach open water: marine expert

    MONTREAL – A pod of orca whales escaped a deadly situation in northern Quebec Thursday but they still face a perilous road to safety, according to a leading marine ecologist.

    The 12 killer whales had been trapped under thick layers of ice for days with only a small opening to breathe from. Strong winds cracked portions of the ice apart early Thursday morning, allowing them to swim toward open water along the northeastern edge of the Hudson Bay.

    But despite their greatly improved situation, the orcas aren’t safe yet.

    “Technically, the whales are free but it’s kind of a conditional release,” said Lyne Morisette, a researcher for the St. Lawrence Global Observatory. “The Hudson Bay is covered in ice so until they get into the Hudson Sea or the Northern Atlantic Ocean you can’t say they’re in open water.”

    The whales became stranded Monday after huge sections of ice shifted behind them while they were migrating near Inukjuak, a fishing village along Quebec’s northwestern coast. They took turns breaching a small hole in the ice in a desperate bid to keep breathing.

    Over time, the killer whales began to weaken, with some sustaining cuts from the jagged chunks of ice that coat much of the province’s northern coastline.

    “It was getting pretty bad. One of the smaller whales was sick and the others were getting weaker,” said Johnny Williams, Inukjuak’s city manager. “You could see their skin start to burn from the ice. People were worried.”

    About 25 km of ice separated the group from more open waters, causing locals to wonder if an icebreaking ship would be needed to clear a path for the killer whales. Experts said that under the conditions they faced near Inukjuak, it was only a matter of time before the orcas would die a slow, painful death.

    “The whales could die from exhaustion or they will suffocate,” Morissette said on Wednesday. “There’s not much time for action ... people have a tendency to think an ice breaker can be dispatched at the drop of a hat but that’s just not the case. It takes time and it costs a lot of money, two factors that work against the whales.”

    The Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada flew a team of scientists into the area Monday morning to monitor the situation. Local airline Air Inuit volunteered one of their planes to help keep an eye on the whales as they attempt to find their way to open water.

    Williams was on site for most of the ordeal to make sure curious bystanders didn’t wander too close to the orcas. Every morning he would hop on his snowmobile, ride from town along the Hudson Bay’s frigid coastline for about an hour before parking near the trapped animals.

    Because killer whales rarely migrate so far north during the winter, the sighting caused a stir in Inukjuak, a town of about 1,500. Dozens made the trek out to sea to snap photos and see the wild animals up close, as Williams watched nervously.

    “I’m 69 and I never saw anything like that ever,” Williams said. “I was worried about the whales being here in the winter but I was worried sick someone might slip in, make things worse.”


    The whales were spotted by a local hunter on Monday and quickly began an international media sensation after footage of the animals was posted on YouTube Tuesday night.


    Read more: Freed orcas in northern Quebec still face perilous journey
    Well, this thread is certainly a roller coaster of emotions. I'm crossing my fingers that they'll make it to the open water safely.
    "Remember to always be yourself. Unless you suck." - Joss Whedon

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