Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 20

Thread: Going to look at a Chessie (Ches. Bay Retriever) on Sunday-anyone ever own one?

  1. #1
    Gold Member ArmyWifey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,236

    Default Going to look at a Chessie (Ches. Bay Retriever) on Sunday-anyone ever own one?

    So after long thought and after finding a good breeder we are going to look at a Chessie on Sunday-any advise from anyone who have been around the breed? Thanks!
    Id rather be hated for who I am than loved for who Im not

  2. #2
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,540

    Default

    We've had a Chessie and 2 Labs (and my husband grew up with up to 5 retrievers in the house at once as a kid). A couple of words of advise. 1. before any other consideration, with the exception of gender, the single most important thing is to get the most submissive/docile pup in the litter. The one that's oh so cute as its jumping up and grawing on you at 6 lbs is no where nearly as cute doing it at 60 lbs. The breeder will be able to guide you, but the standard way to check submissive/dominant is to pick up the puppy and hold it on it's back, like it's a human infant waiting for it's bottle. If it lays there and laughs up at you it's submissive. If it struggles hard and wont stay that way, it's dominant. 2. Get a large dog crate. The puppy is going to be in there until it's at least two, so as to not thrash your house. 3. These dogs are the greatest n the world after they are 2-3 years old. From 6 months to 2 years, is the reason shelters are full. 4. Any retriever as a hunting dog is proogrammed by mother nature to want to have a job in life. You will have to commit a couple of blocks of time every day to redirect whatever energy that could morph into a bored/naughty impulse. Is your property fenced in? Are you getting a boy or girl?

  3. #3
    Gold Member ArmyWifey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,236

    Default

    That is a good idea about checking if the dog will be submissive-we have seen one from the litter and checked that with that one (a female) and she was very mellow and did sit there and was relaxed when Hubby did that-she was alert and playful but also seemed to know when the owner was trying to instruct her-she was about 12 weeks old I think...we do not know the gender yet-we have a time set up for Sunday to go see a breeder-we live on a lot of land in the middle of the country, no fence, but we live high up on a hill away from the road, and we have considered invisible fencing-but we were told that may not work with a dog that is head strong-they usually learn to run through it...we already knew that a crate was going to be a thing we had to get no questions asked...we live a really active lifestyle so walks/jogs/hikes are a thing we do everyday-and will take pup around with us-also to socialize him/her-another must...
    Id rather be hated for who I am than loved for who Im not

  4. #4
    Elite Member Wiseguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    3,201

    Default

    I found this information which might help you:

    Chesapeake Bay Retrievers
    What's good about 'em
    What's bad about 'em


    If you want a dog who...
    • Is the most rugged and powerful of the six retriever breeds
    • Has a short harsh "kinky" coat that comes in natural earthtone shades
    • Loves the great outdoors and thrives on vigorous athletic activities
    • Is steady-tempered and dependable
    • Is more serious and more discriminating with strangers than the happy-go-lucky Golden or Labrador Retriever
    A Chesapeake Bay Retriever may be right for you.


    If you don't want to deal with...
    • Vigorous exercise requirements
    • Rowdiness and exuberant jumping, especially when young
    • Destructiveness when bored or not exercised enough
    • Aggression or shyness toward people, when not socialized enough
    • Strong-willed mind of his own, requiring a confident owner who can take charge
    • Territorial aggression toward dogs and cats he doesn't know
    • Mouthiness -- carrying and chewing objects, mouthing your hands
    • Shedding
    • Health problems
    A Chesapeake Bay Retriever may not be right for you.


    If I were considering a Chesapeake Bay Retriever...

    My major concerns would be:
    1. Providing enough exercise and mental stimulation. Chesapeake Bay Retrievers MUST have regular opportunities to vent their energy and do interesting things. Otherwise they will become rambunctious and bored -- which they usually express by barking and destructive chewing. Bored Chesapeakes can make a shambles of your house and yard.
      If you simply want a pet for your family, and don't have the time or inclination to take your dog running or hiking or biking or swimming, or to get involved in hunting, or agility (obstacle course), or advanced obedience, or tracking, or a similar canine activity, I do not recommend this breed. Trying to suppress their "hardwired" drive to run and work, without providing alternate outlets for their energy, can be difficult.
    2. Bounciness. Young Chesapeake Bay Retrievers (up to about three years old) romp and jump with great vigor, and things can go flying, including people.
      If you have small children, or if you or anyone who lives with you is elderly or infirm, I do not recommend Chesapeake Bay Retriever puppies. The temptation to play roughly is simply too great with many young Chessies.
    3. Providing enough socialization. Though not guard dogs, many Chesapeake Bay Retrievers have protective instincts toward strangers. They need extensive exposure to friendly people so they learn to recognize the normal behaviors of "good guys." Then they can recognize the difference when someone acts abnormally. Without careful socialization, they may be suspicious of everyone, which could lead to aggression. Some Chesapeakes go in the opposite direction -- without enough socialization, they become fearful of strangers, which can lead to defensive biting.
    4. The strong temperament. It bears repeating that Chesapeake Bay Retrievers are not Golden Retrievers. The best Chesapeakes are versatile working dogs, capable of learning a great deal, but they have an independent mind of their own and are not pushovers to raise and train. Some Chesapeakes are willful, obstinate, and dominant (they want to be the boss) and will make you prove that you can make them do things. You must show them, through absolute consistency, that you mean what you say.
      To teach your Chesapeake to listen to you, "Respect Training" is mandatory. My Chesapeake Bay Retriever Training Page discusses the program you need.
    5. Animal aggression. Because of their strong temperament, some Chesapeake Bay Retrievers, particularly males, may not be tolerant of other male dogs. Some Chesapeakes do not get along with cats.
    6. Shedding. Chesapeake Bay Retrievers shed quite a bit. Their hairs come off on your hands when you pet them, stick tenaciously to your clothing, upholstery, and carpeting, and hide under the furniture. Be prepared for vacuuming.
    7. Serious health problems. All retriever breeds are susceptible to joint and bone problems, and eye diseases.
      To keep this breed healthy, I strongly recommend following all of the advice on my Chesapeake Bay Retriever Health Page.


    Not all Chesapeake Bay Retrievers are alike!
    • There are energetic Chesapeakes, and placid Chesapeakes.
    • Hard-headed Chesapeakes, and sweet-natured Chesapeakes.
    • Serious Chesapeakes, and good-natured goofballs.
    • Introverted Chesapeakes, and Chesapeakes who love everyone.
    If you acquire a Chesapeake Bay Retriever puppy, you can't know for sure what he or she will grow up to be like. Because a good number of purebred puppies do NOT grow up to conform to the "norm."
    If you're considering an adult Chesapeake Bay Retriever...

    There are plenty of adult Chesapeake Bay Retrievers who have already proven themselves NOT to have negative characteristics. If you find such an adult, don't let "typical breed negatives" worry you.
    When you acquire a puppy, you're acquiring potential -- what he one day will be. So "typical breed characteristics" are very important. But when you acquire an adult, you're acquiring what he already IS.
    Source: Chesapeake Bay Retrievers: What's Good About 'Em? What's Bad About 'Em?

  5. #5
    Gold Member ArmyWifey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,236

    Default

    Great info-we have thought about all of this already-long story short the breed would be a good fit-we own a lot of land, are very active-and have no problems being stern with a dog to dicipline it (hubby is 13 years in the Army) so that is no problem! We are really active-we live outdoors mostly, and are involved in many activites like hiking, biking, hubby runs/jogs daily for his Army training, we usually hike 7 miles 2 days a week around the country roads together as well-keeping the dog active isn't a problem-being stern or proper care of it isn't a problem, I really don't see any problems, my biggest worry is if the puppy will chew things in the house when young-and probally will so I feel like I will have to watch that a lot, and the house breaking-those are my only real worries, but again, we are capable of training a dog and are very consistant so that isn't really a big deal either...
    Id rather be hated for who I am than loved for who Im not

  6. #6
    Elite Member Wiseguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    3,201

    Default

    You sound like ideal dog owners! I hope you enjoy your dog - they are a beautiful breed.


  7. #7
    Gold Member ArmyWifey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,236

    Default

    Thank you! BTW is your avatar a picture of a litlle Tibetan Spaniel? It looks a lot like one!
    Id rather be hated for who I am than loved for who Im not

  8. #8
    Elite Member Wiseguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    3,201

    Default

    Yes - well spotted, it's a Tibetan. We are in contact with a breeder and are thinking of getting two later this year, and we're also keeping an eye out for shelters to see if they get some Tibetans. We've done different breed selector tests, and Tibbies keep coming up very high on compatibility tests.

  9. #9
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,540

    Default

    The socialization is key. Take her everywhere with you for the first year. And I do mean everywhere. My babies went to the dentist, the dry cleaner, the kid's games. Especially when they are little, no one minds.

  10. #10
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,540

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ArmyWifey View Post
    Great info-we have thought about all of this already-long story short the breed would be a good fit-we own a lot of land, are very active-and have no problems being stern with a dog to dicipline it (hubby is 13 years in the Army) so that is no problem! We are really active-we live outdoors mostly, and are involved in many activites like hiking, biking, hubby runs/jogs daily for his Army training, we usually hike 7 miles 2 days a week around the country roads together as well-keeping the dog active isn't a problem-being stern or proper care of it isn't a problem, I really don't see any problems, my biggest worry is if the puppy will chew things in the house when young-and probally will so I feel like I will have to watch that a lot, and the house breaking-those are my only real worries, but again, we are capable of training a dog and are very consistant so that isn't really a big deal either...
    I repeat..get the crate. Your housebreaking and chewing issues will be painless. Dont feel like you're punishing him with the crate. They regard it as their own little den and will voluntarily go lie in there with the door open. Mine acted very sad when we finally put the crate away. As far as the underground fence, It would be a very unusual dog that would voluntarily break through it if it's on high. I would be most concerned about dominance issues if you have one that does that. A submissive puppy will get zapped once with training and never attempt it again. My only concern with the underground fence vs a real barrier is predatory animals. Where we live in NY we have coyotes, wolves and an occasional bear.

  11. #11
    Elite Member Laxmobster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Down by da beach....boyeee
    Posts
    7,648

    Default

    OMG I love these dogs! I've always wanted one...I have a beagle now, but his next brother or sister is going to be a Chessie! Good luck and post pics when you pick him/her up!
    Quote Originally Posted by Celestial View Post
    I also choose to believe the rumors because I am, when it is all said and done, a dirty gossip.

  12. #12
    Elite Member darksithbunny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    14,132

    Default

    My friend had one when we were growing up and boy did that dog love water! Mud puddles, rain, pools, drainage ditches! LOL. WOW.

  13. #13
    Elite Member Wiseguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    3,201

    Default

    The socialization is key. Take her everywhere with you for the first year. And I do mean everywhere. My babies went to the dentist, the dry cleaner, the kid's games. Especially when they are little, no one minds.
    That's what I plan to do when we get our Tibetan puppies later this year. How did you physically carry your babies? Were they in a crate or a bag??

  14. #14
    Gold Member ArmyWifey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,236

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wiseguy View Post
    Yes - well spotted, it's a Tibetan. We are in contact with a breeder and are thinking of getting two later this year, and we're also keeping an eye out for shelters to see if they get some Tibetans. We've done different breed selector tests, and Tibbies keep coming up very high on compatibility tests.
    It's one of my favorite breeds-I research them quite a bit being the dog lover that I am-great little guys!

    I already went out and priced the crate-almost 200 dollars, but it will need to be big enough for pup to grow into-and socializing it will be no issue either-that dog will be out and about with us everywhere!
    Id rather be hated for who I am than loved for who Im not

  15. #15
    Gold Member ArmyWifey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,236

    Default

    Another question-I have been told by a few people that the oil on their coat can make them smell a bit-is that true? The info I have read says don't bathe them a lot because it strips that oil-but if this pup is just going to be a family pet-do I really have to keep it oily if it won't harm the coat to wash pup every now and then? I don't really want a smelly dog or oil residue all over my house...so the question is-how oily is the coat?
    Id rather be hated for who I am than loved for who Im not

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Coco: life of a Golden Retriever in Japan.....
    By HWBL in forum Pets and Animals
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: May 22nd, 2009, 11:45 PM
  2. Fishermen catch Golden Retriever
    By twitchy2.0 in forum News
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: November 23rd, 2008, 11:37 AM
  3. Golden Retriever fosters kittens
    By Honey in forum Pets and Animals
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: May 14th, 2008, 10:40 AM
  4. Golden Retriever Gives Birth To GREEN puppy
    By moomies in forum Pets and Animals
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: December 27th, 2006, 10:50 PM
  5. George Bush singing "Sunday Bloody Sunday"
    By Delphinium in forum Laughs and Oddities
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: July 2nd, 2006, 07:51 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •