Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 87
Like Tree6Likes

Thread: US woman adopts boy from Russia, then sends him back: 'I don't want him anymore'

  1. #46
    Elite Member Moongirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Cal-i-for-nigh-ay!
    Posts
    7,109

    Default

    Grandmother: Adopted boy sent back to Russia was violent
    By Alan Duke, CNN

    STORY HIGHLIGHTS
    -NEW: Future adoptions to U.S. are banned pending new treaty, foreign minister says
    -NEW: Russian official says grandmother's claim about child's treatment is "a lie"
    -7-year-old's adoptive family in U.S. sends him back to Russia
    -Child exhibited violent and psychotic behavior, according to grandmother

    (CNN) -- A 7-year-old Russian boy adopted by an American family last year was put on a return flight to Moscow this week because of violent and psychotic behavior, according to a Tennessee grandmother.

    The child showed up unannounced at Russia's child protection ministry Thursday, triggering an international investigation.

    Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov told a Russian TV channel on Friday that his country has banned future adoptions by Americans until the United States signs a new agreement to regulate them.

    U.S. diplomats have avoided such an agreement to set responsibilities for the adopting parents, Lavrov said, "but this latest incident has exhausted our patience."

    "We are now investigating the circumstances of the boy's return to see if any crimes were committed," said U.S. Ambassador to Russia John Beyrle. "We are also in close contact with the Russian government on all aspects of the case, and we know that he is being well cared for."

    Nancy Hansen, the Tennessee woman who put Justin Hansen on the plane in Washington, insisted she did not abandon the child, but was following instructions from a lawyer she found online.

    Hansen told CNN that she was concerned about her family's safety after a series of violent incidents and threats.

    "I still have energy and I love children," Hansen said. "It wasn't that he was just energetic and wearing us down. It was the violent tendencies and he had to be watched at all time."

    When her daughter, Torry Hansen, adopted the boy from a Russian orphanage last year, she asked the doctor there if he had any physical or mental problems, Nancy Hansen said.

    The doctor answered "'He's healthy,' and turned and left," she said.

    Once the child learned enough English, he told his new family about the horrors of his previous life, including being beaten at the orphanage after his mother abandoned him, she said.

    He also told of an incident in which he burned down a building near the orphanage, she said.

    Russian Children's Rights Commissioner Pavel Astakhov said the child was "completely healthy, physically and mentally" before the adoption.

    "Nobody withheld anything from her [Torry Hansen]," he said. "It's a lie."

    Justin told Russian officials he was abused by the American family, Astakhov said.

    "There was a grandmother who was at home with the boys," he said. "She used to shout at [Justin] a lot. When I asked how the mother treated him he burst into tears and said she used to pull his hair."

    Hansen said the child had a "hit list" of people he was targeting, including her daughter, who he said he "wanted to kill for the house." He threatened to kill her grandson for a videogame, she said.

    The final incident that convinced Hansen she should send the boy back to Russia was when she caught him starting a fire with papers in his bedroom last Monday, she said. She feared the child might burn down the house and kill her family, she said.


    Hansen and her family were set to meet with Bedford County, Tennessee, Sheriff Randall Boyce on Friday afternoon but their lawyer asked to reschedule the session for next week, a sheriff's spokeswoman said.

    "I'm not sure there's been a crime committed," Boyce said earlier. He was asked by the U.S. State Department to investigate.

    A State Department spokesman said the U.S. government was "very troubled" by the incident.

    "As parents, my wife and I were deeply shocked by the news of Justin Hansen, and very angry that any family would act so callously toward a child that they had legally adopted," Ambassador Beyrle said.

    Nancy Hansen outlined for CNN the process she followed after she decided Justin must go back to Russia.

    When the lawyer she found online advised her the adoption could be reversed, Hansen booked the flight and paid the fee for a steward to escort Justin through the airport, she said.

    She hired a driver in Moscow she found online to pick the child up from the Moscow airport, she said. She found "safe references" for the driver online, she said.

    She then prepared a letter for Justin to present to Russian officials, which included a photo of the driver, whom she identified as "Arthur," she said.

    Justin "had never been happier" than when he boarded the plane for Moscow, she said.

    Russian child protection officials were not happy when the child arrived unannounced at their ministry Wednesday. Nancy Hansen said when they called her there was "a lot of yelling going on."

    But Hansen said after the call she believed the matter was settled and the boy was safe, until she also got a call from the U.S. Embassy. They told her she had set off an "international incident."


    The U.S. State Department spokesman on Friday said it was up to the Russian government to decide whether it will suspend adoptions by Americans because of the incident.

    Ambassador Beyrle said cases of neglect are rare among the "tens of thousands of adopted Russian children who are living happily and lovingly with their American families."

    "But even one incident like this is too many, and we will get to the bottom of what went wrong," he said.

    The Seattle-based agency which Hansen said her daughter used to coordinate the adoption said it found out about Justin's return only Friday.

    "We were alerted to this situation by our branch office in Moscow, Russia, and are shocked and saddened by this turn of events," said a spokeswoman for the World Association for Children and Parents.

    In the 1 percent of the cases where the dissolution of an adoption has been needed, the agency "has always supported and worked closely with [adoptive] parents to assist the child in moving into a new adoptive family," she said.

    CNN's Carolina Sanchez, Dave Alsup and Elise Labott contributed to this report.

    Find this article at:
    Grandmother: Adopted boy sent back to Russia was violent - CNN.com

    2008 Cable News Network

  2. #47
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,621

    Default

    So she found a lawyer, driver and escort online? WTF was she thinking?!!! This kid could have gotten into the hands of some phedo or something.

  3. #48
    Elite Member Honey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    England
    Posts
    59,014

    Default

    Some pics and the letter:


    A mother's rejection: Torry-Ann Hansen plays with her adoptive son Artem at the Vladivostok orphanage last year. Yesterday he arrived back in Moscow alone, clutching a note from her saying she did not want him anymore


    Unwanted: Artem Saveliev is led away by authorities after being rejected by his adoptive American mother



    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldnews/article-1264954/American-sends-adopted-Russian-boy-behavioural-problems.html#ixzz0kixWkMBS

  4. #49
    Elite Member Mivvi21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,567

    Default

    While the way she handled this is abysmal,if he is mentally unstable and the orphanage lied to her about it,then I don't blame her for sending him back. It's most likely for the best anyway because he will hopefully be adopted by a family who can handle his problems,and give him a better home than she could have anyway.

  5. #50
    Gold Member JerriBlank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Oh Canada
    Posts
    763

    Default

    Jesus, if something happened to him along the way or he was abducted or something no one would have any idea....

  6. #51
    Elite Member Trixie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    exiled and ostrich sized
    Posts
    16,962

    Default

    Well, all you have to do is google to find tons of horror stories about Russian adoptions, reactive attachment disorder, and parents who would like to "unadopt." Obviously, most of them don't take such drastic measures but it's clear many of these children have major behavioral problems.

    That said, I do wonder who diagnosed this child with "severe psychopathic issues," and what kind of professional help this family sought. Six months doesn't seem like much time to decide there's no hope whatsoever. Adopting a child is a long-term commitment; you don't just ship one back like a defective appliance.
    These people don't give a fuck about YOU or us. It's a message board, for Christ's sake. ~ mrs.v ~
    ~"Fuck off! Aim higher! Get a life! Get away from me!" ~the lovely and talented Miss Julia Roberts~



  7. #52
    Elite Member celeb_2006's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    13,468

    Default

    Grandmother: Boy terrorized adoptive family in US

    Grandmother: Boy terrorized adoptive family in US - Yahoo! News

    SHELBYVILLE, Tenn. – Torry Hansen was so eager to become a mother that she adopted an older child from a foreign country, two factors that scare off many prospective parents. Her bigger fears came later.

    Torry's mother, Nancy Hansen, said the 7-year-old's violent episodes — which culminated in a threat to burn the family's home to the ground — terrified them into a shocking solution: The boy they renamed Justin was put on a plane by himself and sent back to Russia.

    Now, outraged officials in that country are calling for a halt to adoptions by Americans, and authorities are investigating the family. However, Nancy Hansen told The Associated Press that the motives of her daughter — a 33-year-old, unmarried nurse — were sincere.

    "The intent of my daughter was to have a family and the intent of my whole family was to love that child," she said Friday.

    The family was told the boy, whose Russian name is Artyom Savelyev, was healthy in September when he was brought from the town of Partizansk in Russia's Far East to his new home in the heart of Tennessee horse country. The skinny boy seemed happy, but the behavioral problems began soon after, Hansen said.

    "The Russian orphanage officials completely lied to her because they wanted to get rid of him," she said.

    Hansen chronicled a list of problems: hitting, screaming and spitting at his mother and threatening to kill family members. Hansen said his eruptions were often sparked when he was denied something he wanted, like toys or video games.

    "He drew a picture of our house burning down and he'll tell anybody that he's going to burn our house down with us in it," she said. "It got to be where you feared for your safety. It was terrible."

    Hansen said she thought that with their love, they could help him. "I was wrong," she said.

    Adoption experts say many families are blinded by their desire to adopt and don't always understand what the orphans have sometimes endured — especially older children who may have been neglected or abandoned.

    "They're not prepared to appreciate, psychologically, the kinds of conditions these kids have been exposed to and the effect it has had on them," said Joseph LaBarbera, a clinical psychologist at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville.

    Hansen said her daughter sought advice from psychologists but never had her adoptive son meet with one. They chose an English-language home study program, hoping to enroll him in traditional school in the fall. He would play with his cousin, Logan, at the family's property in Shelbyville, where there is a large backyard and a swingset.

    In February, Hansen said, the family could take no more. The boy flew into a rage, snatched a 3-pound statue and tried to attack his aunt with it. Hansen said he was apparently upset after his aunt asked him to correct math problems on his school work.

    Hansen bought the plane ticket, and the family arranged to pay a man in Russia $200 to take him from the airport and drop him off at the Russian education ministry. He arrived alone Thursday on a United Airlines flight from Washington.

    With him was a note that read, in part: "After giving my best to this child, I am sorry to say that for the safety of my family, friends, and myself, I no longer wish to parent this child."

    The family, meanwhile, has rejected the Kremlin's sharp criticism and any notion that the boy was simply abandoned.

    Pavel Astakhov, Russia's children's rights commissioner, said during a radio interview Saturday that three Russian families have already come forward and asked to adopt the boy.

    Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov has called the boy's return "the last straw" after a string of foreign adoption failures, and officials in Moscow have called for a suspension of all U.S. adoptions in Russia — which totaled about 1,600 last year, according to the nonprofit U.S. advocacy group the National Council For Adoption.

    The Russian education ministry immediately suspended the license of the group involved in the adoption — the World Association for Children and Parents, a Renton, Washington-based agency — for the duration of an investigation.

    Experts and adoptive parents have reacted with similar shock, though they stress that the vast majority of adopted children are raised in happy, loving homes.

    "That incidents like the one today can cause children to remain in orphanages rather than be adopted by loving families is the real tragedy," said Sue Gainor, who adopted a child from Russia in 2001 and is the national chairperson of Families for Russian and Ukranian Adoption.

    Bob Tuke, a Nashville attorney and member of American Academy of Adoption Attorneys, said abandonment charges against the family could depend on whether the boy was a U.S. citizen.

    It wasn't clear if the adoption had become final but a Tennessee health department spokeswoman said there was no birth certificate issued for the boy, a step that would indicate he had become a U.S. citizen.

    There was no response to a knock at Torry Hansen's door, and a phone listing couldn't be found for her. Her mother also declined to put AP in touch with her, and the family has since retained an attorney.

    Bedford County Sheriff Randall Boyce said it was not clear whether any laws had been broken.

    "This is extremely unusual," Boyce said. "I don't think anyone has seen something like this before."

  8. #53
    Elite Member Trixie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    exiled and ostrich sized
    Posts
    16,962

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by celeb_2006 View Post
    Hansen said her daughter sought advice from psychologists but never had her adoptive son meet with one.
    Well, that answers my question...
    These people don't give a fuck about YOU or us. It's a message board, for Christ's sake. ~ mrs.v ~
    ~"Fuck off! Aim higher! Get a life! Get away from me!" ~the lovely and talented Miss Julia Roberts~



  9. #54
    Elite Member bellini's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    6,595

    Default

    With him was a note that read, in part: "After giving my best to this child, I am sorry to say that for the safety of my family, friends, and myself, I no longer wish to parent this child."
    Wow that is harsh. While I can appreciate her struggles, pinning a note to his chest saying "Don't want anymore, return to sender" is terrible.

  10. #55
    Elite Member Air Quotes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Seattle, Washington
    Posts
    13,977

    Default

    Not to mention not going with him to avoid getting in trouble for it once shes there.
    "A true whore just loves her life." - Sluce

  11. #56
    Elite Member southernbelle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,578

    Default

    I do think she should have handled it better, but the minute I read the title, I knew it would be a case like this. We watched a movie in one of my behavioral science classes about these situations. It featured several families who had adopted Russian children who were basically sociopaths. They had all been lied to by the orphanages, and received little to no support when they did complain. The orphanages all continued to deny that the children had problems.

    These children were psychotic, violent, and extremely dangerous. They were also master manipulators, able to turn on the charm to fool people into thinking they were harmless and being unfairly victimized by their adoptive parents. Many of them were threatening to kill their families, hurting or killing animals (one of them killed a family pet), setting fire to things, etc. One of the mothers awoke one night to find her adopted son standing in her doorway with a knife after making repeated threats of killing her and her biological child. It was bone chilling.

    This happens all the time. Orphanages mislead the adoptive families into taking these kids, and it reaches a point where the family fears for their safety and doesn't know what to do. So while I think this family should have handled things more appropriately, I don't doubt for a second that they reached a point where they were terrified to have this kid in their house any longer and just hastily got rid of him as quickly as they could.

  12. #57
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    1,100

    Default

    It's too bad that Russia is using this incident to call for a halt on all US adoptions. There are thousands of Russian orphans who need a good home, and to deny those children a home based on this one incident is foolish, imo.

    The adoptive mother handled this situation very poorly, imo. I believe her when she says that her adopted child has severe psychopathic and behavioral issues (of course Russia and the orphanage aren't going to admit they lied to her about the extent of the boy's issues), and I understand that she couldn't keep this child in her home if she feared for her life and the life of her biological son. But she could have handled this situation a lot better. Even if she didn't want to spend the money to seek counseling and treatment for the boy's issues, she could have at the very least contacted authorities in Russia to make them aware of the situation and that she no longer wanted to parent the boy. Sending the boy to Russia unannounced was the worst possible thing she could have done, imo.

  13. #58
    Elite Member Sundance's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    3,468

    Default

    I have no experience with adopting children from another country, but it seems it would have made more sense for her to contact someone locally about the situation. They could have at least gone through the proper channels to handle this.

  14. #59
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! buttmunch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Uranus
    Posts
    31,885

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elisa View Post
    So she found a lawyer, driver and escort online? WTF was she thinking?!!! This kid could have gotten into the hands of some phedo or something.
    I was thinking the same thing. It just points to her being incredibly callous in every way. And until I see one of those 'I want to burn the house down and everyone in it' pictures I'm reserving judgement. You'd think they'd have those out there right away to support their 'case'. The grandmother sounds like as big an asshole as the mother.
    'Those who sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.' Ben Franklin

    "When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying the cross."
    --Sinclair Lewis

  15. #60
    Elite Member ikmccall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wilmington, Delaware, United States
    Posts
    4,321

    Default

    She can research the lawyer,driver and escort online but couldn't do the same for the orphanage's reputation?
    The money she spent on the plane ticket(s), she could have spend on some sessions with a couple child psychologists.

Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 10
    Last Post: February 2nd, 2010, 12:59 AM
  2. Replies: 22
    Last Post: October 24th, 2008, 08:06 AM
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: March 20th, 2008, 02:26 PM
  4. Replies: 43
    Last Post: December 31st, 2007, 12:04 AM
  5. Britney sends back Kevin's car
    By PlasticGirl in forum Gossip Archive
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: December 5th, 2005, 09:19 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •