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Thread: Tsunami Hits Japan After Massive Earthquake

  1. #151
    Zee
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    That's what I thought when they starting dumping boron (boric acid) into the reactor. That the rods were exposed and damaged. Then the control rods won't quench the reaction. Not a fan of nuclear power

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  2. #152
    Elite Member Mel1973's Avatar
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    This from Yahoo.com this morning:
    TAKAJO, Japan – A tide of bodies washed up along Japan's coastline, crematoriums were overwhelmed and rescue workers ran out of body bags as the nation faced the grim reality of a mounting humanitarian, economic and nuclear crisis Monday after a calamitous tsunami.
    Millions of people were facing a fourth night without water, food or heating in near-freezing temperatures in the northeast devastated by an earthquake and the wave it spawned. Meanwhile, a third reactor at a nuclear power plant lost its cooling capacity and the fuel rods at another were at least briefly fully exposed, raising fears of a meltdown. The stock market plunged over the likelihood of huge losses by Japanese industries including big names such as Toyota and Honda.
    A Japanese police official said 1,000 washed up bodies were found scattered Monday across the coastline of Miyagi prefecture. The official declined to be named, citing department policy.
    The discovery raised the official death toll to about 2,800, but the Miyagi police chief has said that more than 10,000 people are estimated to have died in his province alone, which has a population of 2.3 million.
    In one town in a neighboring prefecture, the crematorium was unable to handle the crush of bodies being brought in for funerals.
    "We have already begun cremations, but we can only handle 18 bodies a day. We are overwhelmed and are asking other cites to help us deal with bodies. We only have one crematorium in town," Katsuhiko Abe, an official in Soma, told The Associated Press.
    In Japan, most people opt to cremate their dead, a process that, like burial, requires permission first from local authorities. But the government took the rare step Monday of waiving that requirement to speed up funerals, said Health Ministry official Yukio Okuda.
    "The current situation is so extraordinary, and it is very likely that crematoriums are running beyond capacity," said Okuda. "This is an emergency measure. We want to help quake-hit people as much as we can."
    Friday's double tragedy has caused unimaginable deprivation for people of this industrialized country — Asia's richest — which hasn't seen such hardship since World War II. In many areas there is no running water, no power and four- to five-hour waits for gasoline. People are suppressing hunger with instant noodles or rice balls while dealing with the loss of loved ones and homes.
    "People are surviving on little food and water. Things are simply not coming," said Hajime Sato, a government official in Iwate prefecture, one of the three hardest hit.

    He said authorities were receiving just 10 percent of the food and other supplies they need. Body bags and coffins were running so short that the government may turn to foreign funeral homes for help, he said.
    "We have requested funeral homes across the nation to send us many body bags and coffins. But we simply don't have enough," he told the AP. "We just did not expect such a thing to happen. It's just overwhelming."
    The pulverized coast has been hit by hundreds of aftershocks since Friday, the latest one a 6.2 magnitude quake that was followed by a new tsunami scare Monday. As sirens wailed, soldiers abandoned their search operations and told residents of the devastated shoreline in Soma, the worst hit town in Fukushima prefecture, to run to higher ground.
    They barked out orders: "Find high ground! Get out of here!" Several soldiers were seen leading an old woman up a muddy hillside. The warning turned out to be a false alarm.
    Search parties arrived in Soma for the first time since Friday to dig out bodies. Ambulances stood by and body bags were laid out in an area cleared of debris, as firefighters used hand picks and chain saws to clear an indescribable jumble of broken timber, plastic sheets, roofs, sludge, twisted cars, tangled powerlines and household goods.
    Helicopters buzzed overhead, surveying the destruction that spanned the horizon. Ships were flipped over near roads, a half-mile (a kilometer) inland. Officials said one-third of the city of 38,000 people was flooded and thousands were missing.
    In addition to the more than 2,800 people who have been confirmed dead, more than 1,400 were missing. Another 1,900 were injured.

    Japanese officials have refused to speculate on how high the death toll could rise, but experts who dealt with the 2004 Asian tsunami offered a dire outlook.
    "It's a miracle really, if it turns out to be less than 10,000 (dead)," said Hery Harjono, a senior geologist with the Indonesian Science Institute, who was closely involved with the aftermath of the earlier disaster that killed 230,000 people — of which only 184,000 bodies were found.
    He drew parallels between the two disasters — notably that many bodies in Japan may have been sucked out to sea or remain trapped beneath rubble as they did in Indonesia's hardest-hit Aceh province. But he also stressed that Japan's infrastructure, high-level of preparedness and city planning to keep houses away from the shore could mitigate their human losses.
    The Japanese government has sent 100,000 troops to lead the aid effort. It has sent 120,000 blankets, 120,000 bottles of water and 29,000 gallons (110,000 liters) of gasoline plus food to the affected areas. However, electricity will take days to restore.
    According to public broadcaster NHK, some 430,000 people are living in emergency shelters or with relatives. Another 24,000 people are stranded, it said.
    One reason for the loss of power is the damage several nuclear reactors in the area. At one plant, Fukushima Dai-ichi, three reactors have lost the ability to cool down, the latest on Monday. Explosions have destroyed the containment buildings of the other two reactors. Fuel rods at the third were fully explosed, at least briefly, on Monday.
    Operators were dumping sea water into all three reactors in a last-ditch attempt to cool their superheated containers that faced possible meltdown. If that happens, they could release radioactive material in the air.
    But Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said the inner containment vessel holding the nuclear fuel rods at the reactor that experienced an explosion Monday was intact, allaying some fears of the risk to the environment. The containment vessel of the first reactor is also safe, according to officials.
    Still, people within a 12-mile (20-kilometer) radius were ordered to stay inside homes following the blast. AP journalists felt Monday's explosion 25 miles (40 kilometers) away.
    Military personnel on helicopters returning to ships with the U.S. 7th Fleet registered low-level of radioactive contamination Monday, but were cleared after a scrub-down. As a precaution, the ship shifted to a different area off the coast.
    More than 180,000 people have evacuated the area around the plants in recent days.
    Also, Tokyo Electric Power held off on imposing rolling blackouts planned for Monday, but called for people to try to limit electricity use.
    Edano said the utility was still prepared to go ahead with power rationing if necessary. The decision reflected an understanding of the profound inconveniences many would experience.
    Many regional train lines were suspended or operating on a limited schedule to help reduce the power load.
    Japan's central bank injected 15 trillion yen (US$184 billion) into money markets Monday to stem worries about the world's third-largest economy.
    Stocks fell Monday on the first business day after the disasters. The benchmark Nikkei 225 stock average shed nearly 634 points, or 6.2 percent, to 9,620.49, extending losses from Friday. Escalating concerns over the fallout of the disaster triggered a plunge that hit all sectors. The broader Topix index lost 7.5 percent.
    Japan's economy has been ailing for 20 years, barely managing to eke out weak growth between slowdowns. It is saddled by a massive public debt that, at 200 percent of gross domestic product, is the biggest among industrialized nations. Preliminary estimates put repair costs from the earthquake and tsunami in the tens of billions of dollars — a huge blow for an already fragile economy that lost its place as the world's No. 2 to China last year.
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  3. #153
    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
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    This is just the end. How can they ever recover from this total nightmare?
    I keep thinkinng of little ordinary things, like those videos we see. How much those people love their children and pets. Did they make it OK?
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  5. #155
    Elite Member Mel1973's Avatar
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    Well, with stuff like this, you have to REALLY want to find some sort of silver lining. The only one I can think of with 1,000s of bodies washing up on the beach is that at least those families will have that closure. They won't wander the city/towns looking for their loved ones and can get on with the things they now need to do to begin to move on.
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  6. #156
    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    Watching the news this morning and it just breaks my heart. These poor people are wandering in their hometown, shouting names of loved ones, friends and pets. A family found their dog and that was pretty much it. Everything else had been lost, but it was like they won the lottery when they found their doggie wandering in the ruins. They were crying and hugging the poor thing.

    Also, am I the only one that is amazed by the behavior of the Japanese people? They are waiting in line for the basic necessities and are actually WAITING in the line. Lined up, orderly, waiting their turn. No looting. The stores were locked and the people just waited outside for them to open.

  7. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by KrisNine View Post
    Watching the news this morning and it just breaks my heart. These poor people are wandering in their hometown, shouting names of loved ones, friends and pets. A family found their dog and that was pretty much it. Everything else had been lost, but it was like they won the lottery when they found their doggie wandering in the ruins. They were crying and hugging the poor thing.

    Also, am I the only one that is amazed by the behavior of the Japanese people? They are waiting in line for the basic necessities and are actually WAITING in the line. Lined up, orderly, waiting their turn. No looting. The stores were locked and the people just waited outside for them to open.
    Knowing my Japanese SIL's personality, I'm not surprised.

    By the way, this morning, HBO was showing the documentary "China's Unnatural Disaster". It was about the massive earthquake in the Sichuan province that killed a disproportionately large number of schoolchildren because the codes (to the extent that they existed at all), were violated. They had scores of parents walking around with large pictures of their deceased children (most of them only children). It was very tough to watch.

  8. #158
    Hit By Ban Bus! AliceInWonderland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KrisNine View Post
    Watching the news this morning and it just breaks my heart. These poor people are wandering in their hometown, shouting names of loved ones, friends and pets. A family found their dog and that was pretty much it. Everything else had been lost, but it was like they won the lottery when they found their doggie wandering in the ruins. They were crying and hugging the poor thing.

    Also, am I the only one that is amazed by the behavior of the Japanese people? They are waiting in line for the basic necessities and are actually WAITING in the line. Lined up, orderly, waiting their turn. No looting. The stores were locked and the people just waited outside for them to open.
    yes and wow, so touching
    Quote Originally Posted by MohandasKGanja View Post
    Knowing my Japanese SIL's personality, I'm not surprised.

    By the way, this morning, HBO was showing the documentary "China's Unnatural Disaster". It was about the massive earthquake in the Sichuan province that killed a disproportionately large number of schoolchildren because the codes (to the extent that they existed at all), were violated. They had scores of parents walking around with large pictures of their deceased children (most of them only children). It was very tough to watch.
    don't even get me started on the people's republic of china - that govt. makes me sick! bless those little souls

    they can put on a great Olympics show but can they take care of their poor people?!!!! no, that country is sick how most of the billion that live there have to struggle in their daily lives, i've seen docs too on just what its like to someone living there, competing for everything, EVERYTHING

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    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel1973 View Post
    Well, with stuff like this, you have to REALLY want to find some sort of silver lining. The only one I can think of with 1,000s of bodies washing up on the beach is that at least those families will have that closure. They won't wander the city/towns looking for their loved ones and can get on with the things they now need to do to begin to move on.
    You have to wonder if anyone is left to identify them. Whole families must be gone, generations of them.
    I didn't start out to collect diamonds, but somehow they just kept piling up.-Mae West

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    Elite Member cupcake's Avatar
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    They dont loot and abuse people like some do here during disasters. They are polite and helpful and respectful. Wouldnt think of taking something that didnt belong to them
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    Hit By Ban Bus! AliceInWonderland's Avatar
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    yeah and I hope they accept help from other nations b/c it must needed!

  12. #162
    Elite Member t13nif's Avatar
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    It's really tragedy overload. I just can't bear it. Like 9/11, the Indonesian Tsunami, Haiti, Christchurch. I'm seriously sliding into depression.
    "Hope everyone' shavin a good one!" - Karistiona

  13. #163
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    They also have a volcano that is sending ash two miles into the sky. Just so the people in southwest Japan don't feel left out.

  14. #164
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    The Japanese companies we are working with worked normally on Friday and today. I keep thinking of those poor people just going on with work while their nation is going through such a tragedy. I'm thinking I would just shut down

  15. #165
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    I agree with t13nif. It's almost too much to handle. I'm not a particularly religulous person, but I am praying nightly for survivors.

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