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Thread: Little boy lost finds his mother using Google Earth. 25 years later.

  1. #16
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by twitchy2.0 View Post
    You're making weirdness where there isn't any. It says he knew the names of his family. That doesn't translate into being able to track them down. This was the eighties. There weren't computer databases you could look up missing children in.
    Damn it! There we go again, with facts!!! Messing up a good opinion....
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  2. #17
    Elite Member southernbelle's Avatar
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    The adoptive family may not have even been aware of the circumstances which led him to the orphanage. They saw a child, in a legitimate orphanage, who needed a home and they gave him one.

    I think he was very fortunate that he was placed so quickly (or at all) - it's unusual for a couple to be interested in a 5 or 6 year old instead of a baby. If there's anyone in this situation who I would be suspcious of, it's the kid's birth mother. I would place the responsibility of trying to locate him with her, not place the responsibility of figuring out why he was up for adoption with the adoptive parents or the orphanage who found a 5 year old beggar child on the streets and took him to place for adoption.

    Overall, it's a great story.

  3. #18
    Super Moderator twitchy2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by southernbelle View Post
    If there's anyone in this situation who I would be suspcious of, it's the kid's birth mother.
    wtf

    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge."

    -- Stephen Hawking

  4. #19
    Elite Member Jezi's Avatar
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    It was rural India, in the early '80s. The mother was likely illiterate, There was no such thing as an amber alert, and I don't think the police would be very much of help. The mother may have wanted to find her child, but what was she supposed to do? I doubt they had phone lines where she lives, and even then, she was most likely very poor. She may have tried, by asking around and spreading the word, but eventually gave up and just hoped the kid would find his way back home. How was she supposed to know he was 1200km away? It's just a very unfortunate situation she couldn't do much about. So she's not to blame at all in my opinion.

  5. #20
    Elite Member SHELLEE's Avatar
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    ^I agree completely.
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  6. #21
    Elite Member sluce's Avatar
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    Damn look at Jezi spouting logic! Take note Monk/Gristle/Estonia/Troll du jour
    You don't engage with crazies. Because they're, you know, fucking crazy. - WitchCurlGirl

  7. #22
    Elite Member southernbelle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by twitchy2.0 View Post
    wtf
    I was referring to an earlier post suggesting that there was something sketchy about the adoptive parents and the adoption agency not trying to find out where the kid came from. I was indicating that in my opinion, I would wonder more about why the mom didn't track him down than why the adoptive parents didn't try to figure out why he was placed for adoption/where he came from.

  8. #23
    Super Moderator twitchy2.0's Avatar
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    yes, and I repeat, WTF?

    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge."

    -- Stephen Hawking

  9. #24
    Elite Member Jezi's Avatar
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    Responsibility or not, the mother may have done all she could which probably wasn't all that much.

    As for the orphanage and their responsibility... all they could do was ask the boy what he knew and remembered, and that wasn't a whole lot of information to work with. They didn't have the resources to do any actual research. So then what? Call the police? I doubt they cared a whole lot about another lost child off the streets.

    It was a different time, a different culture, and no-one involved had the resources to do any more than they did. The kid is very lucky to have ended up in an orphanage and subsequently be adopted. The second best possible outcome for the situation (the best being reunited with his family which just wasn't going to happen).

  10. #25
    Elite Member SHELLEE's Avatar
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    ^There she goes, being all logical again...
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  11. #26
    Super Moderator twitchy2.0's Avatar
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    Saroo could not even name the place from where he'd come. He could barely ask for help. He spoke Hindi. The people here spoke Bengali. ''I was absolutely scared. I didn't know the city I was from, I didn't even know how to count to five, I didn't know left from right.''
    Saroo could not read the platform signs. None of the names being blared out across the public address system sounded familiar. And no one had time for one more hungry kid on the platform.
    After months on the streets of Calcutta, Saroo wound up, one among thousands, in a government detention centre for lost children. Unable to tell anyone even the most basic information about himself, he was sent to a foundling home, and put up for adoption.
    He turned to Google Earth. ''For four years I searched, looking up and down, [then] I started looking from [Calcutta] train station and following the railroad back. But there were so many rail tracks it was sending me absolutely crazy.''
    In 1987, a few weeks after her sons, Guddu and Saroo had gone missing, Fatima Bi was told a boy's body had been found near the tracks at Burhanpur station. It was Guddu.
    His death has never been explained. The police were never greatly exercised. Deaths of poor children, by accident or intent, are too common in India.
    For years, any money she saved, she would spend travelling, following rumours and hunches, looking for her son. ''I had one wish in my life,'' she says. ''And that was to see my son again.''

    source: Little boy lost: a 25-year odyssey

    For people wondering why it took him years of looking to find his village, besides the fact that India is huge, "Indian Railways has 114,500 kilometres (71,147 mi). of total track over a route of 65,000 kilometres (40,389 mi) and 7,500 stations."wiki

    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge."

    -- Stephen Hawking

  12. #27
    Elite Member faithanne's Avatar
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    And if the mother was so poor that she had to send her little boys out to work, I doubt she could have coughed up the money for a private investigator.

    I think it's an amazing story and I'm so happy that the mother was able to discover that at least one of her lost boys had survived.
    "You're going to die tomorrow, Lord Bolton. Sleep well."



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