Page 5 of 9 FirstFirst 123456789 LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 125
Like Tree4Likes

Thread: Chick-Fil-A literally hates gays. Eating there supports their anti equality bullshit.

  1. #61
    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    In WhoreLand fucking your MOM
    Posts
    55,372

    Default

    No kidding, it was only put there in the 50's with all that commie hysteria going around
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

  2. #62
    Elite Member january's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    7,255

    Default

    I'm not opposed to religious symbols and the like, I think every religion has something enlightening or beautiful to be offered, apart from all the bullshit. I take a lot of comfort in philosophical passages in different religious texts, the ones about justice, mercy, equality, etc. I'm not offended by religion at all. The only people I get offended by is people who attempt to push it on other people vocally - a bag is disposable, and I'm not obligated to rush home and see what the passage says. If it offends me, I no longer continue to shop there.

    That said, opting to use the biblical passage John 3:16 does offend me, even as a Christian, and therefore, I will not support that brand (I didn't even realize this occurred before this thread). That's my right as a consumer. John 3:16, in my opinion, is an exclusive passage in which a belief in Jesus Christ is the only pathway to salvation. I don't believe that JC is the only way to God, how presumptuous and awful would I be to believe something like that! I don't have all the answers. It always offends me to see people waving that passage around when there are so many others that offer something worthwhile, and can contribute something to society as a whole. It is pretty ballsy to hand that to people who shop there, who may be Jewish, Muslim, atheist, etc. I do find that offensive. It's providing a service to someone, and also subtly letting them know that they need to believe in a certain religion or risk eternal hellfire. I would give that back, I don't want that in my house, which welcomes people of all faiths (and lack thereof). And most non-religious shoppers may be ignorant to what that passage actually means, which makes me sad for them, that they're lugging this bag around. Is that their right to put that on a bag? Absolutely. But it's my right as a consumer to decide not to patronize that store anymore. That passage may give hope to a lot of Christians, but it's also a very divisive passage, when used in correlation with a handful of other passages in the Bible. If it was THAT important to them to imprint a passage on a bag, why not pick one of the many that have to do with treating others with respect, learning humility, giving to the needy, etc.? People who oppose religion may not understand this because they view religion as divisive (and it often is) but the Bible, and all religious texts for that matter, have a lot to offer that is all about doing good as well. It's a shame that some Christians don't bother reading those passages - it would help this store's cause more to include those passages, not exclusive packages that make you look like a a jackass. Anyway, I know I'll get flamed for this, about believing in a "sky fairy" or believing that religion can offer good, but I take what I want from all different religions and philosophies, and I take a lot of comfort in it. So flame away!
    Women ain't gonna let a thing like sense fuck up their argument. - Chris Rock

  3. #63
    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    In WhoreLand fucking your MOM
    Posts
    55,372

    Default

    Not unless you put it on a bag, missy
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

  4. #64
    Elite Member Lobelia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    a backwards hillbilly state
    Posts
    20,801

    Default

    Gimme your address Grimm, I'm sending you a fucking bag
    "I've cautiously embraced jeggings"
    Emma Peel aka Pacific Breeze aka Wilde1 aka gogodancer aka maribou

    Yip, yip, yip in your tiny indignation. Bark furiously on, lady dog.

  5. #65
    Elite Member Sialia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2,019

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by january View Post
    I'm not opposed to religious symbols and the like, I think every religion has something enlightening or beautiful to be offered, apart from all the bullshit. I take a lot of comfort in philosophical passages in different religious texts, the ones about justice, mercy, equality, etc. I'm not offended by religion at all. The only people I get offended by is people who attempt to push it on other people vocally - a bag is disposable, and I'm not obligated to rush home and see what the passage says. If it offends me, I no longer continue to shop there.

    That said, opting to use the biblical passage John 3:16 does offend me, even as a Christian, and therefore, I will not support that brand (I didn't even realize this occurred before this thread). That's my right as a consumer. John 3:16, in my opinion, is an exclusive passage in which a belief in Jesus Christ is the only pathway to salvation. I don't believe that JC is the only way to God, how presumptuous and awful would I be to believe something like that! I don't have all the answers. It always offends me to see people waving that passage around when there are so many others that offer something worthwhile, and can contribute something to society as a whole. It is pretty ballsy to hand that to people who shop there, who may be Jewish, Muslim, atheist, etc. I do find that offensive. It's providing a service to someone, and also subtly letting them know that they need to believe in a certain religion or risk eternal hellfire. I would give that back, I don't want that in my house, which welcomes people of all faiths (and lack thereof). And most non-religious shoppers may be ignorant to what that passage actually means, which makes me sad for them, that they're lugging this bag around. Is that their right to put that on a bag? Absolutely. But it's my right as a consumer to decide not to patronize that store anymore. That passage may give hope to a lot of Christians, but it's also a very divisive passage, when used in correlation with a handful of other passages in the Bible. If it was THAT important to them to imprint a passage on a bag, why not pick one of the many that have to do with treating others with respect, learning humility, giving to the needy, etc.? People who oppose religion may not understand this because they view religion as divisive (and it often is) but the Bible, and all religious texts for that matter, have a lot to offer that is all about doing good as well. It's a shame that some Christians don't bother reading those passages - it would help this store's cause more to include those passages, not exclusive packages that make you look like a a jackass. Anyway, I know I'll get flamed for this, about believing in a "sky fairy" or believing that religion can offer good, but I take what I want from all different religions and philosophies, and I take a lot of comfort in it. So flame away!
    That was really well said, January.
    "We know who we are, we like talking smack about strangers, and we're not gonna stop!" -- GR's Kalirga

  6. #66
    Elite Member Beeyotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    26,524

    Default

    It WAS really well put, January, it said exactly what I couldn't articulate as an atheist. Religion IS often divisive. To me, the kind of people who would go as far as to put a bible verse on their shopping bags just seem like the kind of people who take religion too seriously for my liking. It's like undercutting your credibility--it's like a line drawn in the sand; it really limits the people you could connect with, businesswise or otherwise, before you're even out of the gate. There's a lot of narrow mindedness that goes along with that sort of zealous religiousness. I mean, really so often it does turn out like this, where a business like Chick-Fil-A is so fundie that it's anti-gay. And that's SO not right.

    Even if it hadn't gone that far, it turns people off, no matter what the original intent. I'm sure many who are vocal about their religion are good people I might get along with.

    But still, this whole thing illustrates why religion should be a private matter. I can see why it's not readily obvious to someone who grew up in this kind of environment, where these kind of passing religious declarations were par for the course and many good people you knew participated in this behavior. But in a bigger fishbowl, it just doesn't fly, it offends a lot of people.

  7. #67
    Elite Member Mr. Authority's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Royal Oak,MI
    Posts
    4,631

    Default

    I wonder if this will shed on this company's hiring practices. If they're against equality for everyone, I can only imagine how their hiring practices are and if they discriminate against people who aren't entirely within their moral compass.

  8. #68
    Elite Member WhateverLolaWants's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    13,660

    Default

    It is strange, though. We have two guys that work at my local chikfila that are pretty obviously gay. Tolerance varies by location?
    ----------------------------
    There will be times you might leap before you look
    There'll be times you'll like the cover and that's precisely why you'll love the book
    Do it anyway

  9. #69
    Bronze Member Sunshine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    163

    Default I am so sad...

    I love the sandwich and sweet tea.

  10. #70
    Elite Member Lobelia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    a backwards hillbilly state
    Posts
    20,801

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WhateverLolaWants View Post
    It is strange, though. We have two guys that work at my local chikfila that are pretty obviously gay. Tolerance varies by location?
    Reminds me of all that Cracker Barrell fuss, where they had some anti-homosexuality press going on (can't remember any details) yet every Cracker Barrell I've ever been to has at least a couple of quite masculine-looking women working there who ping my gaydar. One Cracker Barrell had nothing but women who looked stereotypically lesbian. Dunno.
    "I've cautiously embraced jeggings"
    Emma Peel aka Pacific Breeze aka Wilde1 aka gogodancer aka maribou

    Yip, yip, yip in your tiny indignation. Bark furiously on, lady dog.

  11. #71
    Elite Member holly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    5,721

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sunshine View Post
    I love the sandwich and sweet tea.

    my husband loves their lemonade.

  12. #72
    Elite Member sprynkles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    At the salon
    Posts
    17,537

    Default

    I've never seen this place here in my state, but I guess we do have one in the student union building of the college in my city. Weird.

    Meryl doesn't even try anymore. She just calls Lanvin and asks for curtains with a belt.~Bitter
    Can we interest you in Leann Rimes? She has a nice little cadre of fans you'd probably enjoy.~ Pecan Pie

  13. #73
    Super Moderator twitchy2.0's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Milliways
    Posts
    53,574

    Default

    South Bend Homosexual Organization Targets Chick-Fil-A For Protest

    By Scott Sarvay
    January28,2011
    SOUTH BEND, Ind. (Indiana’s NewsCenter) - Chick-fil-a sandwiches are no longer allowed to be sold on Indiana University's South Bend campus and the reason stems from the actions of another franchise.
    Members of the Campus Ally Network, which promotes acceptance and support for the university's homosexual community protested because the restaurant's Pennsylvania franchise donated food to an anti-homosexual organization's event.
    Chick-fil-a's president says providing food to events is not an endorsement of the mission, political stance or motives of this or any other organization.

    Source:South Bend Homosexual Organization Targets Chick-Fil-A For Protest | Indiana's NewsCenter: News, Sports, Weather, Fort Wayne WPTA-TV, WISE-TV, CW, and My Network | Regional
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Quote Originally Posted by Lobelia View Post
    I don't get why anybody would get their panties in a wad over a bible verse on a bag. Big whoop. It's not like they're making people sit through a sermon in order to shop there.
    Or you could hate them because they steal designs, don't pay minimum wage, don't pay overtime, don't give promotions to people who aren't "saved", moved the bulk of the operation overseas to avoid labour laws. The pretending to be holier-than-thou is just the hypocricy icing on the cake of nastiness.

    Forever 21's Bizarre Knockoff Empire

    The top row of shirts is by Forever 21. The bottom row is by a small California-based label called Trovata. Welcome to a peek behind the curtain at secretive, cult-y, and very rapidly growing fast-fashion chain Forever 21.

    It's always a bad sign when, on a store tour with a retailer's head of marketing, a reporter sees a pair of shoes on the shelf that look exactly like the pair she has on. Except the identi-shoes are a different brand, aren't real leather, and cost less than a quarter of what she paid for them. "You should buy another pair here," suggests the marketing exec when the reporter, BusinessWeek's Susan Berfield, points this out. (Marketing execs are so unflappable.)

    Although Forever 21 cooperated with BusinessWeek's story, the company wouldn't allow Berfield to even set foot in its design and merchandising headquarters, which are housed in a building of their own on Forever 21's corporate campus, a building with its own security. "The windows are covered with blinds," writes Berfield. Her requests to go inside "were met with laughs by Forever 21's representatives."
    "Their design is swathed in mystery," says Susan Scafidi, a professor of copyright law at Fordham University Law School and director of the Fashion Law Institute. "But it probably looks a bit like a crime scene, with the chalk outline of the garments they're copying."
    Forever 21 is a $3 billion chain that counts 477 stores in 19 countries and around 35,000 employees; it has been expanding aggressively during the recession, opening enormous new stores in spaces abandoned by retreating retailers like Saks, Circuit City, and Mervyns. Forever 21 expects to open another 75 stores in 2011.
    The company was founded and is still owned by Do Won and Jin Sook Chang, Korean immigrants to Los Angeles. Do Won Chang has said he got the idea when he was working at a gas station, and noticed that all the nice cars were owned by people in the rag trade; Jin Sook Chang says that she went to a mountain one morning to pray and God told her she should open a store and that she would be successful. Jin Sook is in charge of whatever it is goes on in that merchandise building. Her husband handles everything else. Their daughters, Linda and Esther Chang, both have high-powered positions within the company despite only being in their twenties, and are expected to take over eventually. Linda wears Forever 21, but mixes it with Chanel.

    A lot of weird things stand out about the company culture. For one, there's the whole Evangelical Christian thing:
    "Every decision that they made has been with thoughtful prayer," says Linda. Mr. and Mrs. Chang attend a daily 5:30 a.m. prayer meeting at the Ttokamsa Mission Church when they're in town; he also leads Bible study, and she's a deacon. "I think they get a lot of business ideas and insight during early morning prayer time," Pastor Ken Choe says in an e-mail. According to him, they've contributed millions of dollars to missions around the world and regularly go on missions themselves, including to Afghanistan, India, and Pakistan. They've told their daughters that when they retire, they want to devote themselves fully to the church. "Mr. Chang said he would have been a missionary if this hadn't worked out," says Linda. "This supports that. This is part of their missionary vision."
    Berfield reports that there are Bibles at the company's headquarters, and it's generally understood that in order to advance within the company, one should be "saved."

    And then there are the lawsuits. Turns out that having a brand new selection of $19.80 rayon blazers and $23.80 pleather shoes delivered by the ton daily is not easily achieved without ending up on the wrong side of labor laws. Forever 21 used to manufacture most of its clothing in Southern California, using a variety of local suppliers. The reasons were simple: Until 2005, an international textile trade agreement offered some measure of protection to the U.S. apparel industry and made outsourcing more expensive, and domestic manufacture also allowed for shorter lead times and a nimbler response to customer demand.

    But there are also labor laws in the U.S. And in 2001, Asian Pacific American Legal Center and the Garment Worker Center sued the company on behalf of 19 workers who alleged they had not been paid legally required minimum wages and overtime. The lawsuit spawned a three-year-long boycott of the company and was the subject of an Emmy-winning documentary, Made in LA. Forever 21 eventually settled the suit (the terms are confidential). "It was a difficult time for them," Esther Chang says of her parents' reaction to the lawsuit.

    Since then, the Changs have moved a lot of Forever 21's production to countries like China, India, Pakistan, and Vietnam. Still, Berfield finds one L.A. factory where workers earn 12 cents apiece to sew vests that retail for $13.80:
    The California Broadway Trade Center sits on the edge of the garment district, across from the derelict Rialto Theater and just down the street from new lofts built in the old Union Bank. It's a nine-story building that houses at least 80 of these factories. At the loading dock, scraps of paper are taped to the wall, listing in Spanish the jobs available that day. The building looks uncared for, but not decrepit.
    Some of the doors to these factories are open, making it possible to walk around unannounced. In one, on the top floor, with no company name on the door, about 30 people are sewing gray cotton vests for Forever 21 in a small, hot room. Many of them have stuffed scraps of fabric into their noses to block the particles of material floating in the air. They're just finishing up a one-week, 10,000-piece order for which the seamstresses earn about 12 cents apiece, according to Guadalupe Hernandez, a longtime garment worker in Los Angeles. If they sew 66 vests an hour, they'll earn minimum wage.
    Oh, and there's also the whole ripping off other people's intellectual property thing. Forever 21 has confidentially settled more than 50 Forever 21 lawsuits with designers who have accused it of stealing their intellectual property. The only suit to make it to an open trial was Trovata's, at which Jin Sook Chang variously claimed on the witness stand that she didn't know what percentage of the company she and her husband owned, if there were any other shareholders, or even what her company's annual sales were. Trovata's lawyers, meanwhile, turned up evidence that the Changs, through various holding companies and investment vehicles, in fact owned or part-owned some of their biggest "independent" suppliers — the same suppliers Forever 21 attempts to publicly distance itself from whenever labor rights violations or copyright violations emerge from the production supply chain. Diane Von Furstenberg, Anna Sui — who once gave guests at her fashion show t-shirts that read "Forever WANTED: Don Cassidy and The Sundance Jin" that quoted Exodus 20:15, "Thou shalt not steal" — and Anthropologie are among the other designers who have won settlements from the company.

    Forever 21 tends to avoid knocking off large and well-protected fashion companies, like Chanel or Louis Vuitton Mot Hennessy, both of which are notorious for aggressively policing their copyrights. Forever 21 knocks off smaller, less established labels — like Trovata, Alexander Wang, and Foley + Corinna, whose printed maxi dress is shown here next to its Forever 21 copy — because those brands are less likely to be able to mount a vigorous legal defense. Berfield also talks to a designer, Virginia Johnson, who saw a knock-off of one of her skirts for sale at Forever 21; when her lawyer contacted the company, "he learned that the company had a policy in place for just such scenarios. They would pay Johnson 10 percent of the $40,000 worth of skirts they said they had sold. When Johnson rejected that as too low, they offered $9,000, which she accepted. 'I was surprised how matter-of-fact they were,' she says." Forever 21 denies it has any such policy.

    So: Forever 21's workers earn minimum wage — if they can sew an entire vest every 55 seconds. The Changs meanwhile buy their daughters Chanel and educated them at prep schools and Ivy League colleges. And if one of their dresses or tops turns out to have been someone else's idea first, well — the fat profits on all those vests make for lots of settlement money. Fast fashion, like a lot of things about the fashion industry, really isn't very pretty underneath.
    Trovata/Forever 21 image from Trovata's lawsuit; Foley + Corinna/Forever 21 image via
    Forever 21's Fast (And Loose) Fashion Empire [BusinessWeek]
    Frontier Justice: Anna Sui Takes Aim At Forever 21 [Counterfeit Chic]

    Quote Originally Posted by Lobelia View Post
    Nuns shouldn't even be allowed to walk down the sidewalk. People see them, and that's offensive.
    Damn right. Fucking penguins.
    Quote Originally Posted by SHELLEE View Post
    Your avatar doesn't offend me, I just want to know where to get 2 of those so that I can make them fight.
    Amazon.com: NUNZILLA: Toys & Games

    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge."

    -- Stephen Hawking

  14. #74
    Elite Member Lobelia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    a backwards hillbilly state
    Posts
    20,801

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by twitchy2.0 View Post
    Or you could hate them because they steal designs, don't pay minimum wage, don't pay overtime, don't give promotions to people who aren't "saved", moved the bulk of the operation overseas to avoid labour laws. The pretending to be holier-than-thou is just the hypocricy icing on the cake of nastiness.
    Well all that makes more sense than getting pissed off over a BAG

    It's easy to have contempt for hypocrites.
    "I've cautiously embraced jeggings"
    Emma Peel aka Pacific Breeze aka Wilde1 aka gogodancer aka maribou

    Yip, yip, yip in your tiny indignation. Bark furiously on, lady dog.

  15. #75
    Elite Member Beeyotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    26,524

    Default

    But doesn't that make it easier to see how other people might see a correlative relationship and form assumptions about companies that are this vocal about their religiousness? If they're that extreme, it often leads to hatefulness.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Lutheran Church embraces gays: abolishes all anti-gay policies
    By buttmunch in forum Faith and Religion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: April 19th, 2010, 06:50 PM
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: February 21st, 2009, 12:37 PM
  3. Replies: 145
    Last Post: December 28th, 2008, 03:38 AM
  4. Anti-chick flick
    By ohmygoodness in forum Television and Movies
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: March 13th, 2007, 12:46 AM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 1st, 2006, 05:16 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •