Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 42
Like Tree63Likes

Thread: 8-Year-Old Girl, Mother and Family Member All Found Dead In NJ Pool News

  1. #16
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    33,005

    Default

    When our daughter was 5, and our son was 3, I had some extra PTO I needed to burn before the end of the year. So, I took my kids to the indoor pool. I had a mask for our daughter that covered both her eyes and nose -- like a snorkle mask. Almost instantly she was able to start holding her breath and going underwater. Totally off to the races. A natural in any depth of water. Our son ended up needing a pretty good amount of lessons at the YMCA.

    One thing that swim lessons will not prepare you for, and I talk to my kids about it still when we go to the beach - is about rip currents. Fully grown people who are good swimmers have drowned out in Ocean City, MD because they didn't know how to handle them. I've told our kids that if you are being pulled out by the current, just go with it, and then swim parallel to the beach when it weakens. And then swim back in from there. But only swimming when lifeguards are around is obviously the safest.
    sputnik and MsDark like this.

  2. #17
    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Sleepy night night land
    Posts
    23,908

    Default

    ^^That's so true. Our daughters swim coach told her that the strongest swimmers can drown easily in the ocean. Surviving rip currents goes against all of your natural impulses and sense of survival. Just like you said, you don't fight it, just go with it.

    Living here in Southern California, water is everywhere. If it's not your pool, it's a friends pool, a neighbors, or the community. Learning to swim is a survival skill anywhere, but one that you have to be incredibly on top of here. I'm still really cautious with my daughter, and she's 9. I'm especially nervous when a whole group of her friends are together. They're always climbing on each other and some kid always gets a throat full of water!

    My kids a pretty good swimmer, but every summer I think she's really rusty and needs to get more lessons. She loves the pool, so I think I'm going to keep her in swimming of some sort.
    sputnik and MohandasKGanja like this.

  3. #18
    Elite Member Sleuth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Vegemite Land
    Posts
    6,461

    Default

    In Australia, swimming lessons are part of most (if not all) schools Physical Education programs. So I guess it is difficult me to imagine how my body might react if I had never had a swimming lesson in my life and suddenly found myself in the deep end of the pool. I'd like to think that I would have been able to at least float or basically figure it out while I attempt to save a drowning child. Eitherway, these stories are always tragic because it just seems so avoidable.
    Alicia Silverstone: "I think that the film Clueless was very deep. I think it was deep in the way that it was very light. I think lightness has to come from a very deep place if it's true lightness."

  4. #19
    Elite Member emkat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    2,065

    Default

    I could never ever have a home with a pool. I would not have a moment's peace just thinking about someone drowning in it.
    I saw DEATH, an anorexic penguin, an overcooked Gollum, Mr. Burns in need of a haircut and a methed-up Riff Raff.--Michael K. on Phil Spector

  5. #20
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    4,062

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sprynkles View Post
    May I ask why you haven't taken swimming lessons? It's a good family project. The YMCA is a great way to learn.
    Quote Originally Posted by sputnik View Post
    yeah, i really recommend it too. obviously maybe not right now with the pandemic and everything but further down the line. not just because it's a really useful life skill but because there's something incredible about being able to move freely in water, without fear. you don't have to be sporty/athletic at all. there's nothing quite like it.
    Quote Originally Posted by emkat View Post
    I could never ever have a home with a pool. I would not have a moment's peace just thinking about someone drowning in it.
    I almost drowned when I was younger. I used to start gasping for air if the water hit my chin.

    Fear of someone drowning was/is a real fear of mine
    sputnik, Brookie and lindsaywhit like this.

  6. #21
    czb
    czb is online now
    Elite Member czb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    left coast
    Posts
    17,546

    Default

    ex-lifeguard here, both at pools and the beach. one thing i will tell you is that there are a LOT of people who don't know how to swim. a LOT. and people who can't swim freak out in the water. so that's why it doesn't matter if the water is only 4 feet deep and they can stand, they won't. they flail and lose a lot of energy and then they freak out. you try to pull them out and sometimes they are still flailing and might strike you (the lifeguard). and a lot of the people who don't know how to swim also don't know how to float. when i used to guard, the adults who can't swim made me more nervous than the kids who can't.

    i put my kids in swim school when they were toddlers. swimming really is a life skill and so important.

  7. #22
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    fellow traveller
    Posts
    57,746

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mostroop View Post
    I almost drowned when I was younger. I used to start gasping for air if the water hit my chin.

    Fear of someone drowning was/is a real fear of mine
    it can be really traumatic.
    i don't remember this (thankfully) but when i was around a year and a half or two, i woke up from napping while everyone was having lunch outdoors at a relative's house, and just walked into the pool. luckily, my cousin's husband noticed and jumped up from his seat and into the pool and pulled me out. my parents are good swimmers and would have taught us anyway but after that happened, they were even more motivated and all of us started learning to swim as toddlers and we all had to take lessons.

    Quote Originally Posted by czb View Post
    ex-lifeguard here, both at pools and the beach. one thing i will tell you is that there are a LOT of people who don't know how to swim. a LOT. and people who can't swim freak out in the water. so that's why it doesn't matter if the water is only 4 feet deep and they can stand, they won't. they flail and lose a lot of energy and then they freak out. you try to pull them out and sometimes they are still flailing and might strike you (the lifeguard). and a lot of the people who don't know how to swim also don't know how to float. when i used to guard, the adults who can't swim made me more nervous than the kids who can't.

    i put my kids in swim school when they were toddlers. swimming really is a life skill and so important.
    this is true. i didn't realise this until quite late and just assumed everyone or at least the vast majority of people knew how to swim. i guess i took for granted the access to swim lessons i had as a kid and the importance my parents placed on making sure we knew how to. in addition to the lessons my parents signed us up for, i remember my (public) school organised swimming lessons at the local community center pool as well. i don't know how good those lessons were or how much we learned but i'm pretty sure they gave you at least a good grasp of the basics. and then when i was 11 we moved to geneva which has a massive lake right in the middle of the city that everyone swims in, but even just from a safety perspective, having such a large body of water close by and that you can't avoid, public schools were for the most part pretty good about organising swimming lessons.
    Last edited by sputnik; June 30th, 2020 at 07:53 AM.
    czb and I'mNotBitter like this.
    I'm open to everything. When you start to criticise the times you live in, your time is over. - Karl Lagerfeld

  8. #23
    Elite Member burnt_toast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    2,917

    Default

    Swim lessons were mandatory for my brothers and I. My mom was adamant that we knew how to swim from a very very young age ... I think I started swimming at about two so I can't even imagine what it's like not knowing how to swim. I agree, it's a tremendously valuable skill and I would imagine learning as an adult would be so gratifying.
    czb likes this.

  9. #24
    Elite Member sprynkles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    At the salon
    Posts
    23,371

    Default

    It really is an important life skill. I spent lots of summers at municipal pools and the YMCA where I took lessons and later did a brief stint on a swim team. I didn't start until Jr. High. but became a pretty good swimmer. They made us tread water for 20 minutes before we could do anything else. It was brutal. At first. I just loved being in the water.

    When I was around 30 I had to pull a huge young guy out of a river. I was happy to have hung on to those life saving skills I learned as a kid. This dumb ass had no business being where he was and it was pretty hard getting him out of the middle of a moving stream of water over to the swimming hole area. He was easily 75 pounds heavier than me. And I was a smoker at the time. He was lucky I was out near him or he likely would have drowned. He was with a group of friends and none of them even noticed he was missing or in trouble. Every year we have at least 2 young 21ish aged men drown around here. It's heartbreaking.
    Last edited by sprynkles; June 30th, 2020 at 10:46 AM.
    sputnik and Ravenna like this.

  10. #25
    Elite Member Beeyotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    30,672

    Default

    It's not talked about a lot but access to pools and real structured swimming instruction is not really available to lower socioeconomic classes. There are always exceptions, but I think it's far more common for the poorer minority demographic to not have access (to pools or $/time for lessons) and not prioritize learning to swim.
    I've read about this being the case with the poor black demographic, and anecdotally I know it's extremely common for the poor Mexican demographic in L.A.

  11. #26
    Elite Member Trixie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    exiled and ostrich sized
    Posts
    21,468

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MohandasKGanja View Post
    One thing that swim lessons will not prepare you for, and I talk to my kids about it still when we go to the beach - is about rip currents. Fully grown people who are good swimmers have drowned out in Ocean City, MD because they didn't know how to handle them. I've told our kids that if you are being pulled out by the current, just go with it, and then swim parallel to the beach when it weakens. And then swim back in from there. But only swimming when lifeguards are around is obviously the safest.
    I live at Lake Michigan and every year we have drownings at the various beaches due to the rip currents. I don't know why anyone would get in that water on those days. There are usually signs but many areas are private beaches with no lifeguards. There was a drowning last weekend at the National Park beach, some 18 year old kid. The rescue boat found him pretty quickly but it was too late. Sometimes it takes days to recover them. When you hear/see the helicopters over the lake, you know there's trouble.
    lindsaywhit likes this.
    These people don't give a fuck about YOU or us. It's a message board, for Christ's sake. ~ mrs.v ~
    ~"Fuck off! Aim higher! Get a life! Get away from me!" ~the lovely and talented Miss Julia Roberts~



  12. #27
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    33,005

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by emkat View Post
    I could never ever have a home with a pool. I would not have a moment's peace just thinking about someone drowning in it.
    Pools really come with positives and negatives. I've read that they actually LOWER the perceived value of a house sometimes because they are a burden to maintain and a legal/insurance liability. I'm almost positive that a pool is considered something like "an attractive nuisance", which means that even if someone trespasses on your property and gets hurt in there, that you have legal exposure. So, you have to put a fence around it, get umbrella insurance, etc. We have literally the perfect back yard for a pool, but just cutting the grass is enough maintenance for me. Also, our community has like 20 outdoor and 5 indoor pools that come with your gym membership.

    Quote Originally Posted by KrisNine View Post
    ^^That's so true. Our daughters swim coach told her that the strongest swimmers can drown easily in the ocean. Surviving rip currents goes against all of your natural impulses and sense of survival. Just like you said, you don't fight it, just go with it.
    Another thing I didn't realize is that jetties - those piles of giant boulders or pier-like material create rip currents. Rehoboth Beach has a number of jetties along the most popular areas of the beach, and there are very detailed posted signs at the jetties warning against the risk of rip currents if you swim to close to them.
    KrisNine likes this.

  13. #28
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    33,005

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Trixie View Post
    I live at Lake Michigan and every year we have drownings at the various beaches due to the rip currents. I don't know why anyone would get in that water on those days. There are usually signs but many areas are private beaches with no lifeguards. There was a drowning last weekend at the National Park beach, some 18 year old kid. The rescue boat found him pretty quickly but it was too late. Sometimes it takes days to recover them. When you hear/see the helicopters over the lake, you know there's trouble.
    (Sorry for the double post, but the editor won't let me add this to my last one.) You just reminded me of a horrifying thing that happened when I was a teenager. My parents' house had a massive park and trail system within about 200 yards of where they lived. One night, around midnight, we would hear helicopters flying what felt like continuously over the neighborhood and with search lights coming down toward the park. It went on forever, and I thought they were looking for a fugitive or something, even though no prisons are nearby. It turns out that two sisters (like 6 and 8) got up out of their beds in the middle of the night to walk down to a pond that was part of the park. And they both drowned in it. I thought the family was Indian, but it turns out they were Latina.

    ETA - I found the article about it. And I got pretty much everything wrong. I was already married, too, when it happened. We must have been staying overnight at my parents..

    By Veronica T. Jennings



    January 29, 1991

    Two young sisters who were pulled unconscious from an icy neighborhood pond in Montgomery County were pronounced dead early yesterday after rescuers failed to revive them, according to police.
    The two girls, Michelle Luna, 11, and Rachel Luna, 9, were pulled from Valley Mill Pond about 11:30 p.m. Sunday by a team of divers from the county Fire and Rescue Department.
    Both girls died early yesterday morning at Children's Hospital of complications from being submerged for an undetermined length of time in the freezing waters, authorities said. Autopsies are scheduled to be performed by the D.C. Medical Examiner's Office.
    The girls' father, Fernando Luna, frantically began searching their neighborhood Sunday afternoon when his daughters failed to return from playing outside, according to neighbors. Valley Mill Pond is in the Snowden Mill neighborhood of Silver Spring, which is between New Hampshire Avenue and Route 29. Officials at the Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission, which owns the pond, said signs were posted last month warning residents to stay off, but apparently those signs were no longer up when the drownings occurred.

    It was not clear yesterday what enticed the girls to go to the pond or what they did when they got there.
    Yesterday, the Luna parents grieved for their only children, according to a relative. Playmates and other friends talked quietly about the "very smart girls" and their reluctance to hang out at "Girl Scouts' Pond," the nickname used in the neighborhood.
    "Michelle was an A student," said one boy, sitting on his bicycle among a group of about five friends outside the Luna family's house on Serpentine Way. The boy said Michelle, a sixth-grader, "was very quiet."
    James Manis, 14, said Michelle "was never the type of person to go near that pond. She had been told repeatedly by her parents not to go there."
    For most neighborhood children, the quarter-acre pond is a popular gathering place.
    "I ice-skated on the pond last year," said 14-year-old Mike Weisbord. "The ice gets very thick." Other children said they had played ice hockey on the pond and ridden bikes across it.

  14. #29
    czb
    czb is online now
    Elite Member czb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    left coast
    Posts
    17,546

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beeyotch View Post
    It's not talked about a lot but access to pools and real structured swimming instruction is not really available to lower socioeconomic classes. There are always exceptions, but I think it's far more common for the poorer minority demographic to not have access (to pools or $/time for lessons) and not prioritize learning to swim.
    I've read about this being the case with the poor black demographic, and anecdotally I know it's extremely common for the poor Mexican demographic in L.A.
    this is actualy a huge issue. and it is doubly true for people who live in an urban setting. not so many pools, and belonging to a pool club is sometimes too cost prohibitive, even if it is the local Y. growing up, our schools did not have pools because they considered it too dangerous, the kids in our community were considered too rough and the administration didn't think the staff could manage it. so i bet a lot of those kids never learned to swim.

    while it's not impossible to teach an adult to swim, it is just SO much harder. adults tense up and if they had a fear of the water as a kid, it is 10million times worse as an adult. even if the adult is motivated, they just become rigid and don't listen. my worst students by far were adults.

  15. #30
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    fellow traveller
    Posts
    57,746

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beeyotch View Post
    It's not talked about a lot but access to pools and real structured swimming instruction is not really available to lower socioeconomic classes. There are always exceptions, but I think it's far more common for the poorer minority demographic to not have access (to pools or $/time for lessons) and not prioritize learning to swim.
    I've read about this being the case with the poor black demographic, and anecdotally I know it's extremely common for the poor Mexican demographic in L.A.
    yup.
    this is what i meant when i said i took for granted the amount of access i had to pools and swimming lessons growing up, not just through my parents but also the cities and public school districts i went to. and didn't realise until pretty late that this was not the case for everyone or even most people.
    I'm open to everything. When you start to criticise the times you live in, your time is over. - Karl Lagerfeld

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Man found dead in Demi Moore’s pool
    By dowcat in forum Latest Gossip
    Replies: 109
    Last Post: August 3rd, 2015, 11:32 AM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: December 12th, 2012, 02:53 PM
  3. Ohio family of four found dead
    By angelais in forum News
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: February 2nd, 2009, 10:14 AM
  4. Replies: 21
    Last Post: January 2nd, 2008, 02:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •