Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 18
Like Tree9Likes

Thread: The pill is linked to depression

  1. #1
    Elite Member Neptunia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,849

    Default The pill is linked to depression

    The pill is linked to depression – and doctors can no longer ignore it

    Holly Grigg-Spall

    Monday 3 October 201610.00 BST

    Hormonal contraceptives are used by 3.5 million women in the UK alone. The medical establishment must stop dismissing the risks they ca
    A newly published study from the University of Copenhagen has confirmed a link between hormonal contraceptives and depression. The largest of its kind, with one million Danish women between the ages of 15 and 34 tracked for a total of 13 years, it’s the kind of study that women such as me, who have experienced the side-effects of birth control-induced depression first hand, have been waiting for.

    Women taking pill more likely to be treated for depression, study finds



    Researchers found that women taking the combined oral contraceptive were 23% more likely to be diagnosed with depression and those using progestin-only pills (also known as “the mini-pill”) were 34% more likely. Teens were at the greatest risk of depression, with an 80% increase when taking the combined pill, and that risk is two-fold with the progestin-only pill. In addition, other hormone-based methods commonly offered to women seeking an alternative to the pill – such as the hormonal IUS/coil, the patch and the ring – were shown to increase depression at a rate much higher than either kind of oral contraceptives.
    In recent years we’ve seen efforts from the NHS and family planning organisations to encourage teens to use these so-called LARCs (long-acting reversible contraceptives), primarily because they eliminate the need to remember to take a pill every day, but also due to the fact they’re commonly believed to have less severe potential side-effects than the pill. The new research suggests this practice is misguided. We already know that those with pre-existing depression may find the pill worsens their symptoms, and if teens were at greater risk of depression, then continuing this practice would be negligent.


    The researchers note that, because GPs are less likely to prescribe the pill to women who already have depression and because women who do experience depression on the pill are more likely to stop taking it, this study probably underestimates the potential negative affect that hormonal contraceptives can have on mental health.

    Having spent the past eight years researching and writing on the emotional and psychological side-effects of hormonal birth control, I initially felt elated to read this study. Not just for myself, but for the hundreds of women I’ve interviewed over the years. Mood changes are one of the top reasons many women discontinue using the pill within the first year. Finally, here was the kind of large-scale, long-term study I’d been told was necessary before we could seriously talk about this issue or make a change in how we prescribe hormonal contraceptives.


    However, I was naive, because it seems that no study will ever be good enough for the medical community to take women’s experiences seriously. As soon as this research dropped, the experts lined up to deliver their usual mix of gaslighting and paternalistic platitudes. We’re told not to be alarmed, concerned, or deterred from continuing to use our hormonal contraceptives, mostly by men who have never and will never take them themselves (partly because the long-term, large-scale study undertaken by WHO on the “acceptability” of the male pill revealed it would negatively impact their emotional wellbeing).

    This “pillsplaining” is specific to discussions of research into the side-effects of hormonal birth control. Usually, when the research is on the pill alone, we’re quickly informed there are many other hormone-based methods to choose from, but unfortunately this new study says those alternatives are even worse. One expert even tried to dismiss the link with depression in pill-taking teens as more likely the result of “teen heartbreak”.

    So, why is it that we’re not supposed to take this study seriously? Considering that women are fertile just six days per menstrual cycle and men are fertile every single day, that the burden of avoiding unwanted pregnancy falls to us, regardless of the burden that might have on our health and wellbeing, is nothing short of sexism. After all, there are certainly effective alternatives to hormonal contraceptives –the copper coil, diaphragm, condoms and new technology that’s making it simple for women to practice the fertility awareness method, not to mention, of course, vasectomy and the promise of Vasalgel, a contraceptive injection for men.

    Yet, we’re reminded with one medical professional’s response to this new research that “an unwanted pregnancy far outweighs all the other side effects that could occur from a contraceptive.” If that’s true, why bother researching the side-effects at all?
    It is important to remember that women are twice as likely to experience depression as men


    It is important to remember that women are twice as likely to experience depression as men, reportedly due to “the fluctuation of progesterone and oestrogen levels”, in other words our biological femaleness. It’s apparently acceptable to blame women’s depression on the fact that they’re women, but it’s not OK to claim a powerful medication formulated from synthetic hormones could be at fault.
    To me, and many other women, these Danish researchers are heroes and criticism of their methods (such as, they should have tracked those women using condoms or the copper IUD as well – even though these options were not available to them; or that women were likely depressed because of menstrual cramps – which the pill is supposed to prevent), only highlights the incredible knots the medical establishment will twist itself into in order to deny there’s a problem with the pill.

    One of the study’s authors, Øjvind Lidegaard, professor of obstetrics and gynaecology, also brought attention in 2011 to the increased risk of blood clots associated with newer, and supposedly “improved”, hormonal contraceptives such as the ring, the patch and drospirenone-containing pills. Lidegaard plans to focus next on researching the possible “association between taking hormonal birth control and attempting or committing suicide”. Researchers originally flagged up this potential link back in 1970 at the Nelson Pill Hearings, but the topic has not been touched since.

    Depression and anxiety from hormonal contraceptives may not be the experience of every woman, but that doesn’t mean it’s not the experience of your friend, your daughter or your partner, and of many women out there, who, in reading about this could have their lives changed for the better.


    https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...contraceptives




  2. #2
    Elite Member Neptunia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,849

    Default

    I sometimes wonder about this. I'm fortunate enough not to have depression but what is the pill doing to my body? I'm eating in a healthy manner, trying to go organic and vegetarian, exercise, etc. but I'm taking this hormonal pill...

    Has anyone here ever had depression that they can link to the pill? Do you wonder about taking it too? That it could possibly affect your body in a negative way? Has anyone had any bad side effects?
    louiswinthorpe111 likes this.

  3. #3
    Elite Member MmeVertigina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Your inner ear
    Posts
    3,533

    Default

    I don't have links right now, sorry, but I have read where the pill does affect the flora of your gut. Your immune system relives heavily on gut flora and function and the pill can throw that off. Not surprisingly depression has also been linked to the gut and immune reactions, so I can see how the pill would be connected to this. When I was much younger I took the pill (several types over a few years), I did have side effects that caused me to stop taking it, they were not depression related though.

    Just quickly googled here are a couple of links, I am sure with time you can find better info (actual links to more studies) out there Link Found Between Gut Bacteria And Depression | IFLScience , http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/836260 , https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0728110734.htm, this one is quick and easy What The Bacteria In Your Gut Have To Do With Your Physical And Mental Health | Huffington Post

    and these are more about the pill and gut Birth Control: The Pill Linked to Crohn's Disease, Other GI & Stomach Issues | Shape Magazine , That Naughty Little Pill - Birth Control | Blog | Kelly Brogan MD, another quick and easy read The birth control pill and gut health connection | Well+Good

    HTH!
    Last edited by MmeVertigina; October 5th, 2016 at 07:52 PM.

  4. #4
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,358

    Default

    I just got off the mini pill and feel a bit better, I have to say the month I used NOTHING I felt way better, but getting pregnant or my tubes tied isn't a great option right now. Plus not having my period is awesome.

  5. #5
    Elite Member MsDark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Northwest MS/Memphis TN
    Posts
    24,163

    Default

    Ultimately, not having your period is not good for you.
    My Posts Have Won Awards. Can Any Of You Claim The Same? -ur_next_ex

    "I don't have pet peeves. I have major psychotic fucking hatreds, okay". ~George Carlin

  6. #6
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,358

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MsDark View Post
    Ultimately, not having your period is not good for you.
    Probably not the best, but I have PCOS and other pelvic problems so I end up very sick and in a lot of pain on my period. It's why I haven't had an ablation or hysterectomy yet (GYN doesn't feel it's beneficial at my age).

  7. #7
    Elite Member ManxMouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Lemuria
    Posts
    7,466

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MsDark View Post
    Ultimately, not having your period is not good for you.
    Why?
    Never heard there's any evidence supporting that view. And it's not like all that junk just sits there inside you. The lining never builds up to begin with.
    I'm with the research that asks, why the f do we need periods at all? No good evolutionary reason. So fuck that.
    rollo and pinkbunnyslippers like this.
    Santa is an elitist mother fucker -- giving expensive shit to rich kids and nothing to poor kids.

  8. #8
    Elite Member Sarzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    England
    Posts
    13,940

    Default

    I've been on the mini pill for 8 years and not had a problem with it. But obviously it's different for everyone. I love not having periods.

  9. #9
    Elite Member rollo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    38,025

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ManxMouse View Post
    Why?
    Never heard there's any evidence supporting that view. And it's not like all that junk just sits there inside you. The lining never builds up to begin with.
    I'm with the research that asks, why the f do we need periods at all? No good evolutionary reason. So fuck that.
    I would like to know too, Ms. D.
    I have some famous friends and I have mostly not famous friends.

  10. #10
    Elite Member Sarzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    England
    Posts
    13,940

    Default

    I saw this on Web md about stopping periods

    Women often ask if it’s OK to stop their periods, says Tara Kumaraswami, MD, an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at University of Massachusetts Medical School. They worry that the period is building up inside.It’s not, Kumaraswami says. If you’re on birth control, it’s fine to not have a period. Talk to your doctor if you’re looking for a way to skip or lighten your periods. She can help you figure out what’s right for you. There are a lot of options. Here are a few.
    rollo likes this.

  11. #11
    Elite Member Bluebonnet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    7,704

    Default

    "The Pill Is Linked to Depression"

    Kittylady and lindsaywhit like this.
    Cats are really just land based sharks in fur coats. - Kittylady

  12. #12
    Elite Member Charmed Hour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    4,811

    Default

    Hormonal imbalances are also linked to depression. Frankly, I'd rather have a steady flow of hormones thanks to supplementation than deal with natural ebb and flow most of us experience. My hormones were whacked out after weight loss surgery and besides the nearly 4 month menstruation I experienced- the mood swings and such I experienced was a horror. And not just for me. It affected nearly everyone in my life.
    Bluebonnet likes this.

  13. #13
    Elite Member Bluebonnet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    7,704

    Default

    I had to get on the pill at age 16 due to ovarian cysts and I had such horrible, horrible anxiety. I had no idea what was wrong or what to call it and no one to talk to about it. This was back in the day when no one listened to a 16 yr old.

    Between fucking hormones and the ridiculous amount of estrogen my body produced; causing damn cysts and evil endometriosis, I had no youth, really. I was celebrating the day I had a hysterectomy. I'm "woo hoo-ing" all the way into the operating room.

    Well, that is until the Versed kicked in. But I bet I was sub consciously "woo hoo-ing".
    Last edited by Bluebonnet; October 6th, 2016 at 01:46 PM.
    Cats are really just land based sharks in fur coats. - Kittylady

  14. #14
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    24,828

    Default

    I kind of feel like this is not my story to tell, but I'm going to do it anyway. A significant person in my life has been on the Pill (I used to remember the exact name) for 30+ years. She is as healthy as you can get, with the exception of exercise-related injuries. No incidents of depression related to taking it. She is more depressed about the fact that it's not too far off when she will no longer need it.

  15. #15
    Elite Member gas_chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    35,112

    Default

    I loved being on the pill and hated that I had to go off due to my blood pressure. I noticed after I went off the state of my PMS increased, not in a good way, about a 1000 percent.
    I am going to come and burn the fucking house down... but you will blow me first."

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Father of the pill
    By TheMoog in forum Politics and Issues
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: April 28th, 2007, 09:43 PM
  2. The Size Zero Pill
    By firecrotch in forum Weight
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: October 27th, 2006, 08:48 AM
  3. Pill popper
    By spiffy in forum Blind Items
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: September 4th, 2006, 12:47 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •