Results 1 to 7 of 7
Like Tree4Likes
  • 2 Post By BoogsBun
  • 2 Post By Kathie_Moffett

Thread: Discovery of graves affects UMMC parking plan (1,000 bodies)

  1. #1
    Elite Member MmeVertigina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Your inner ear
    Posts
    3,320

    Default Discovery of graves affects UMMC parking plan (1,000 bodies)

    Discovery of graves affects UMMC parking plan | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

    Discovery of graves affects UMMC parking plan

    1,000 bodies may have been asylum patients

    Future progress for the state’s longtime medical school has collided with the ghosts of Mississippi’s past — the discovery of a 1,000 bodies buried on its campus and the likelihood of more.Officials of the fast-growing University of Mississippi Medical Center had planned to build a parking garage east of the dental school, where a grove of trees now sits.But testing in the area revealed 1,000 bodies, believed to have been patients at the Mississippi State Lunatic Asylum a century ago.“None have names,” said Dr. James Keeton, dean of the medical school.Paying for reburials elsewhere would cost about $3,000 apiece, or $3 million total, he said. “We can’t afford that.”New plans include building the parking garage next to the dental school, he said.Others plans may have to change, too. Medical center officials had hoped to use the property west of the dental school for future expansion, but Keeton said they might have to rethink that approach, because other bodies may lie beneath the earth — former slaves, TB victims and possibly even Civil War dead.The UMMC ground on which Keeton and Gov. Phil Bryant recently stood to announce construction of the $11 million American Cancer Society Hope Lodge is believed to contain yet more bodies.For that reason, UMMC officials said both the lodge and a new Children’s Justice Center would likely have to be relocated on the 164-acre campus, where both space and parking seem to be growing scarce.The State Lunatic Asylum opened on the site in 1855, housing 150 patients.Eight years later, the Union’s 46th Indiana Infantry Regiment arrived at the asylum. One soldier wrote that the patients “were terribly excited and were seen at the windows shouting to the soldiers.”Readying for the siege of Jackson, the soldiers set up camp, built fortifications and grew vegetables to sustain themselves, said Jim Woodrick, director of the Historic Preservation Division of the state Department of Archives and History.During the ensuing battle, Confederate soldiers fired back and hit the asylum, injuring at least one patient, he said.By the time the Union Army left, one soldier penned that Jackson is a “ruined town,” he said.After the Civil War ended, the mental facility expanded to house 300 patients, and the area became known as “Asylum Hill,” a neighborhood that included houses, a school and a church for former slaves, Cade Chapel M.B. Church.The area eventually saw construction of a fertilizer factory, a Baptist orphanage and a sanatorium for those suffering from tuberculosis.The hill had several cemeteries: one for asylum patients, one for M.B. church members and one for paupers. Some have suggested there may be Civil War graves there, too.In 1935, Mississippi moved the asylum to its present location at Whitfield.
    There is a video at the link, this page was ridiculously hard to copy. I thought it was interesting that they found so many unmarked graves when there was an official cemetery available.

  2. #2
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    4,546

    Default

    I have always been into history/archaeology/anthropology, so this is fascinating. I wish someone would fund a genealogy/DNA program for it. There are 1,000 families out there, that had one of their relatives "disappear", never to be seen or heard from again. It's kind of sad if you think about it. It's very lost and forgotten soul like.

  3. #3
    Elite Member MmeVertigina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Your inner ear
    Posts
    3,320

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BoogsBun View Post
    There are 1,000 families out there, that had one of their relatives "disappear", never to be seen or heard from again. It's kind of sad if you think about it. It's very lost and forgotten soul like.
    Yes, exactly! And thank you to whoever moved this

  4. #4
    Elite Member Kathie_Moffett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    just another freak in the freak kingdom
    Posts
    6,956

    Default

    Wow, what an eerie story. I'm sure somewhere a screenwriter is thinking "ahHA! coeds, a huge lost graveyard full of lunatics who may've died under suspicious circumstances...excavation...angry spirits...nubile coeds....YES!!!"
    ManxMouse and MmeVertigina like this.
    Did you know that every time a parent gives in to their kid's whines and buys them candy at the checkout lane, a kitten gets diabetes?-Dlisted
    I dislike groups of people, but I love individuals. Every person you look at, you can see the universe in their eyes, if you're really looking.
    -George Carlin

  5. #5
    Elite Member whitetigeress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    West coast of Canada, eh
    Posts
    2,079

    Default

    Wow! The stories researching those dead bodies could tell

  6. #6
    Super Moderator twitchy2.0's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Milliways
    Posts
    53,573

    Default

    ..probably not as much as you might want to know. They're from an era when the physically or mentally 'defective', unwed mothers, etc were often just swept under the rug and forgotten. Families would just quietly get rid of embarrassments and never speak of them again.

    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge."

    -- Stephen Hawking

  7. #7
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    4,546

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by twitchy2.0 View Post
    ..probably not as much as you might want to know. They're from an era when the physically or mentally 'defective', unwed mothers, etc were often just swept under the rug and forgotten. Families would just quietly get rid of embarrassments and never speak of them again.
    I figured most of them are from the TB epidemic. People were dying faster than they could bury them, plus the shitty paperwork system from yesteryear.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. How this clusterfuck affects the economy
    By Grimmlok in forum U.S. Politics and Issues
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: October 1st, 2008, 09:39 PM
  2. How domestic surveillance affects you and me
    By witchcurlgirl in forum U.S. Politics and Issues
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: July 7th, 2008, 06:24 PM
  3. Replies: 17
    Last Post: May 23rd, 2008, 12:02 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •