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Thread: Tulane Law School Admits Convicted Murderer

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    Elite Member southernbelle's Avatar
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    Default Tulane Law School Admits Convicted Murderer

    For a first-year law student at Louisiana's Tulane University, Bruce Reilly has an impressive resume. He is a leader in the movement promoting human rights and social justice in prisons. He is a screenwriter that has worked in film and theater. He has also received two scholarships for Tulane.

    But one part of Reilly's past is not on his resume: he is a convicted murderer.

    This piece of his life was revealed recently when popular law blog, "Above the Law," did an extensive story on Reilly, including his thoughts in addition to the concerns of other students.

    When news of Reilly's past began to spread, people he did not know began to friend him on Facebook and try to make contact with him.

    Convicted Killer Rattles Tulane Law School

    "We live in a passive-aggressive culture of curiosity and fear," he wrote in a now-removed post on his website Unprison. "Let's cut to the chase: I killed a man 19 years ago."

    In 1993, Reilly, now 38, was arrested for the murder of Charles Russell, an English professor at Community College of Rhode Island. He allegedly stabbed Russell to death and stole some of his property, according to The Times-Picayune. Reilly plead no contest to second-degree murder and robbery and spent 12 years in jail.

    In a letter to "Above the Law," an anonymous Tulane student wrote a scathing criticism of the school expressing anger that students had been compared to Reilly in the admissions process and that he received scholarships.

    The student also wrote about the possibility that "when placed in one of the most stress-inducing environments in the United States, Mr. Reilly will reach his tipping point and live up to his violent past, pulling a Virginia Tech-esque move and [harm] fellow students."

    Reilly responded to all of the talk in a letter to the website.

    "I understand that some of my classmates have probably never had any known interactions with people who have committed a violent crime or been imprisoned," he wrote. "This is yet another opportunity for society to learn that we need everybody involved if we are truly going to build a strong and equitable community."

    While Tulane would not comment specifically on Reilly's situation, David Meyer, dean of Tulane's School of Law said the following in a statement: "We evaluate each law school applicant as an individual, taking into account all available information bearing on their character, life story and academic qualifications. Our admission process also allows for exceptional circumstances if the prospective student's experience and background will contribute to his and his peers' study and appreciation of various aspects of the law."

    While Reilly defends his motivations and right to attend the law school, he is also candid about living with his crime.

    "In some ways I deserve this. I brought this on myself," Reilly told The Times-Picayune. "For the last 19 years I've had to come to grips every day with the terrible thing I've done. I took a man's life. How can I possibly brush that off, or make up for it?"

    While in prison, Reilly became interested in the law and emerged wanting to be an advocate for prisoners' rights. After coming out of prison, he worked for several non-profits involved with prisons, parolees and prisoners' families. He also honed his artistic skills in illustration, graphic design, tattoo art and acting, according to his LinkedIn profile.

    He received a Dean's Merit Scholarship and an NAACP Legal Defense Fund scholarship for Tulane and is a member of the law school's class of 2014.

    There is also a question about whether Reilly would even be able to practice law as a convicted felon. According to the Louisiana State Supreme Court, felons are not automatically precluded from practicing law, but they have the burden of proving "good moral character and fitness to practice."

    Reilly insists that he was upfront with Tulane about his past and is determined to earn his law degree.

    "By the time I apply to a state or federal bar, my last criminal activity will be as a teenager, and over two decades passed. I will be presenting a model case for rehabilitation, an impressive resume, and a substantial list of esteemed supporters," he wrote in his letter to "Above the Law." "I have found that a majority of our society believes in forgiveness and second chances, and all I can do is keep doing what I'm doing."

    http://abcnews.go.com/US/tulane-law-student-revealed-convicted-murderer/story?id=14537434

  2. #2
    Elite Member greysfang's Avatar
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    If the guy did his time and has done no wrong for 20 years, then let him be.
    FUCK YOU AND GIVE ME MY GODDAMN VENTI TWO PUMP LIGHT WHIP MOCHA YOU COCKSUCKING WHORE BEFORE I PUNCH YOU IN THE MOUTH. I just get unpleasant in my car. - Deej

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    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    he served his sentence. i don't see the point in continuing to punish prisoners after they are released, especially if they are trying to do something productive with their lives.
    I'm open to everything. When you start to criticise the times you live in, your time is over. - Karl Lagerfeld

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    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    I think he's less of a danger to society than Joseph Amendola.

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    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MohandasKGanja View Post
    I think he's less of a danger to society than Joseph Amendola.
    ...and he was found Not Guilty on the lesser charge of making Pie Charts.
    MohandasKGanja likes this.
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    Elite Member Mel1973's Avatar
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    Dude did his time, he paid for his crime. Let him be. Sounds like some sour grapes on the part of the anonymous student who wrote this shit: ""when placed in one of the most stress-inducing environments in the United States, Mr. Reilly will reach his tipping point and live up to his violent past, pulling a Virginia Tech-esque move and [harm] fellow students."

    asshole - jealous asshole.
    Kill him.
    Kill her.
    Kill It.
    Kill everything... that IS the solution!
    П(•_•)П
    twitchy molests my signature!

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    Elite Member sluce's Avatar
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    I agree that he did his time. I also give him bonus points for admitting his guilt instead of putting the victims family through a trial.
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    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Jesusfuckingchrist. People can change, the prison system in more developed countries than the US (where is is about punishment), is about reform, so surely he is a success story?
    Free Charmed.

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    Elite Member Laurent's Avatar
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    Where he'll really get down to brass tacks is with the bar. In some states, being a convicted felon is a deal breaker when it comes to actually sitting for the bar exam. It may be called something different in every state, but in mine, you will almost certainly at the very least have to go before what's called the Character & Fitness committee and be grilled. I've seen them hard time people for past DUIs and other misdemeanors. I would really hate to go through the 3 years of sheer hell law school is only to be told I couldn't sit for the exam by the state bar.
    “What are you looking at, sugar-tits?” - Mel Gibson

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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurent View Post
    Where he'll really get down to brass tacks is with the bar. In some states, being a convicted felon is a deal breaker when it comes to actually sitting for the bar exam. It may be called something different in every state, but in mine, you will almost certainly at the very least have to go before what's called the Character & Fitness committee and be grilled. I've seen them hard time people for past DUIs and other misdemeanors. I would really hate to go through the 3 years of sheer hell law school is only to be told I couldn't sit for the exam by the state bar.
    I agree. I was going to say what's the point? You can't get a license with a record. If you are convicted of a crime, you lose your license to practice. I didn't even realize in some states you can't even sit for the exam. Maybe he should just get another degree.

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    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Well, first of all, it IS possible to get a law degree for something other than being a practising lawyer.
    Secondly, although some states may exclude people with felonies it appears that not ALL do. The application states the current situation & advises to state why "X" won't happen again. I'd've thought that since this guy has served his time and subsequently done many charitable acts, and got himself into law school that he is not the same person he was when he was TWENTY years ago. Hardly surprising, most people change, of they don't change with their life experiences I can point out someone with major issues.
    Free Charmed.

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    Elite Member Laurent's Avatar
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    I understand that not all people use their law degree for the active practice of law. I went to school with some who chose not to, however, most do want to sit for the bar exam, at least. I have no idea where he plans to sit for the bar, but since he's in an accredited law school, the door is wide open. My state does have an issue with convicted felons and will make them submit to a character and fitness committee. I knew one or two people who weren't cleared by character and fitness to sit for the exam and it was a serious blow. That's all I was saying.
    “What are you looking at, sugar-tits?” - Mel Gibson

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    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Sorry Laurent, maybe I should've been clearer - I was responding to this ..
    Quote Originally Posted by travelbug View Post
    I agree. I was going to say what's the point? You can't get a license with a record. If you are convicted of a crime, you lose your license to practice. I didn't even realize in some states you can't even sit for the exam. Maybe he should just get another degree.
    which isn't true.


    Given his subsequent actions, he has grounds to go before a fitness committee. I'm sure that he's given it due consideration.
    Free Charmed.

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    Elite Member Laurent's Avatar
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    Ah, got it, Novice. Thought you were talking to me. Sorry for my confusion.

    In response to travelbug, in my state the requirement for sitting for the state bar is to have passed law school and the bar issues your law license. You have to apply to sit for the exam and they have the final say over who can and can't take it. You can appeal their decision if they say no, but not everyone wants to get into a pissing contest with the bar for reasons I'm sure everyone can appreciate. I won't say it's impossible to ever sit for the exam with a felony conviction, because I'm sure it's not, but it's a hurdle and it's a gamble to risk years of law school and maybe not be able to sit for it. It would be enough to make me nauseated. As for automatically losing your license with a conviction - not much is automatic in the law, at least in my state. They'll give you a platform to plead your case, and from what I've witnessed it takes a hell of a lot to be permanently disbarred.
    “What are you looking at, sugar-tits?” - Mel Gibson

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    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    No problem Laurent.

    If a lawyer commits a felony while performing as a lawyer, then their "fitness" to make the right/wrong choices should be examined. What were the choices & why did they come to that decision.
    The difference with this guy is that the felony was commited over 20 years prior to what maybe his bar application. Do you see the difference (Travelbug)?
    Free Charmed.

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