Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Fake L.A. Subway Map: What LA Would Look Like With a Comprehensive Rail System

  1. #1
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Beyond Caring, then hang a left.
    Posts
    41,595

    Default Fake L.A. Subway Map: What LA Would Look Like With a Comprehensive Rail System

    Fake L.A. Subway Map: What Los Angeles Would Look Like With a Comprehensive Rail System

    By Simone Wilson Wed., Apr. 11 2012 at 1:00 PM
    Comments (15)
    Categories: Transportation




    Numan ParadaOver Beverly Hills' dead body.Numan Parada, an L.A.-area mapmaker, created a "fantasy public transit map" for Los Angeles in 2007 -- and it appears the map has gone viral again this spring. Were not surprised. No matter your position on Metro's budget priorities, it's hard not to drool at the prospect of instant rail transportation from any corner of L.A. County to another.


    Parada reportedly based the fantasy draft on the London Tube, down to the $23 font he bought to replicate the text on the London Underground map. And, well -- it was worth it! This fake L.A. subway map may be the hottest piece of transit porn ever to circulate the Internet.
    Makes you wonder, too. Could a public-transportation utopia like Parada's ever exist in Los Angeles?
    In an L.A. Times profile circa 2007 (when the map first blew up), Parada said: "While I don't sincerely think a system like this is realistic to build, I think it can give hope."
    L.A. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa has displayed similar hope, frequently travelling to Washington to beg for transportation grants and tell anyone who'll listen (or won't) about his plan to build a "Subway to the Sea."
    But rail is astoundingly expensive -- especially compared to the amount it would cost to bolster L.A.'s crumbling bus system. Critics often bash the L.A. Metropolitan Transit Authority for repeatedly cutting bus lines to throw billions more at trendy pipe dreams for a full subway in Los Angeles. (The Bus Riders Union has even gone so far as to say Metro's rail favoritism is racist.)
    The biggest obstacle here is the sheer size of Los Angeles County. Genevieve Giuliano, a professor at the USC School of Policy, Planning and Development, told the Times:
    "Instead of trying to overlay 19th century rail technology on a 21st century city, we should be reinventing the bus system, providing exclusive lanes for buses in places where we need the capacity to move people. That's a whole lot cheaper than building billions of dollars of rail."
    Also, because the county has already been so densified around a crap traffic system -- ever-widening roads that, no matter how wide, could never accomodate the hordes of vehicles that need them -- it's hard to convince residents, businesses, schools, etc. to scoot over for a noisy/messy subway line.
    Case in point: The battle currently raging between Metro and the City of Beverly Hills. Predictably, the latter doesn't want some dirty train car running through, shuttling downtown scum onto its prestigious shopping grounds.
    Metro will end up spending millions just fighting the Beverly Hills lawsuits -- and that's on top of the $9 billion or so it would take to expand the Purple Line westward, should Metro come out of the community battle alive.
    Still, it's fun to dream.
    Here's fantasy...

    Numan Parada... and here's reality.
    metro.netTold you it was depressing. [@simone_electra / swilson@laweekly.com / @LAWeeklyNews]
    Fake L.A. Subway Map: What Los Angeles Would Look Like With a Comprehensive Rail System - Los Angeles News - The Informer
    Free Charmed.

  2. #2
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    4,546

    Default

    So the very last picture, is what the train system really is? Wow, I would have thought there would have been more than that.

  3. #3
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Beyond Caring, then hang a left.
    Posts
    41,595

    Default

    There used to be but they built underground warehouses & stuff that cuts off quite a lot of it. I saw something on one of those History channel programs.
    Free Charmed.

  4. #4
    Elite Member hustle4alivin's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    4,508

    Default

    It would be awesome if this could come true, but Los Angeles was designed and built for the car from the 1940's on, so old habits die hard.

    A lot of people don't realize the Red Cars/Pacific Electric Railway routes were the catalyst for sprawl in LA long before the freeways became a factor. It's just that LA was designed to be the "anti-city", totally opposite of say, New York or Chicago, which are more high-density. LA is denser now because it has to be - the mountains and ocean get in the way of further sprawl. I don't think anyone expected that as many people would move to the area as they did. I have relatives in Southern California who said that in the 1960's, it was wonderful and a perfect balance, but as more and more people moved in, the crush of people got to be too much.

    Believe it or not, LA is actually underserved by their freeways. The area has one of the lowest lane-per-population ratios in the country. There were supposed to be more freeways than the ones that were built. I found a map that showed how many more freeways were to be constructed before the freeway revolts in the 1960's:

    http://www.cahighways.org/maps/1956-la-mteb2.pdf

    However, the schizophrenic design of the area will prevent LA from having a comprehensive transit system like the one shown in the maps - Downtown LA isn't the only major business center in the area, so it's not like NYC where the majority of commuters go into Manhattan, or Chicago into the Loop or DC's Downtown area, or even San Francisco and it's Financial District (but nearby Silicon Valley is a major center that is more auto-oriented and the Bay Area is pretty congested anyhow), so any transit system that could be designed would have to serve multiple areas, which would be expensive and impractical. Same reason why Houston, Dallas, Atlanta, or Phoenix won't ever have one either. Americans love their cars and their suburbs, no matter how unsustainable that lifestyle it is for the future and government policies have been designed to subsidize that lifestyle for the past 60 years.

  5. #5
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Beyond Caring, then hang a left.
    Posts
    41,595

    Default

    For over five decades, Southern California had one of the most extensive rail transit networks in the world, with over 1,000 miles (1,600 km) of track operated by the Pacific Electric Railway (Red Cars) and Los Angeles Railway (Yellow Cars). The rail system was dismantled piecemeal in the years after World War II by a network of holding companies and intermediaries owned by a General Motors-led consortium as part of an effort to sell more buses and cars in what became known as the Great American streetcar scandal. In 1958, ownership of the system(s) fell to the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority, a government agency (a different agency from the current one with the same name), who presided over the final removal of the system during the late 1950's and early 1960's. By 1963, the last remaining Los Angeles streetcar lines were closed down and removed in favor of using automobiles on an extensive freeway system, with mass transit provided only by buses. In the decades that followed, the immense volume of traffic generated by the automobiles of 14 million people in the greater metropolitan area eventually led to renewed support for mass transit.
    Metro Rail (Los Angeles County) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



    Metro Rail is the rapid transit rail system consisting of five separate lines (the red, purple, blue, green, and gold lines) serving 70 stations in the Los Angeles County, California area. The new Expo line is due to enter service on April 28, 2012. It connects with the Metro liner bus rapid transit system (the orange line and silver line) and also with the Metrolink commuter rail systems. The system, which has a daily weekday ridership of approximately 350,000 as of July 2011,[1] is owned and operated by the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) and started service in 1990. It has been extended significantly since that time and several further extensions are either in the works or being considered.
    It is the indirect descendant of the Pacific Electric Red Car and Los Angeles Railway Yellow Car lines, which operated between the late 19th century and the 1960s.[2]
    Free Charmed.

  6. #6
    Elite Member lurkur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    5,341

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Novice View Post
    For over five decades, Southern California had one of the most extensive rail transit networks in the world, with over 1,000 miles (1,600 km) of track operated by the Pacific Electric Railway (Red Cars) and Los Angeles Railway (Yellow Cars). The rail system was dismantled piecemeal in the years after World War II by a network of holding companies and intermediaries owned by a General Motors-led consortium as part of an effort to sell more buses and cars in what became known as the Great American streetcar scandal. In 1958, ownership of the system(s) fell to the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority, a government agency (a different agency from the current one with the same name), who presided over the final removal of the system during the late 1950's and early 1960's. By 1963, the last remaining Los Angeles streetcar lines were closed down and removed in favor of using automobiles on an extensive freeway system, with mass transit provided only by buses. In the decades that followed, the immense volume of traffic generated by the automobiles of 14 million people in the greater metropolitan area eventually led to renewed support for mass transit.
    Metro Rail (Los Angeles County) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



    Metro Rail is the rapid transit rail system consisting of five separate lines (the red, purple, blue, green, and gold lines) serving 70 stations in the Los Angeles County, California area. The new Expo line is due to enter service on April 28, 2012. It connects with the Metro liner bus rapid transit system (the orange line and silver line) and also with the Metrolink commuter rail systems. The system, which has a daily weekday ridership of approximately 350,000 as of July 2011,[1] is owned and operated by the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) and started service in 1990. It has been extended significantly since that time and several further extensions are either in the works or being considered.
    It is the indirect descendant of the Pacific Electric Red Car and Los Angeles Railway Yellow Car lines, which operated between the late 19th century and the 1960s.[2]
    Yep. There was existing infrastructure to serve the people's interest and it was torn out to serve the business interests. Why help people when you can exploit them for money?
    If being cunty is wrong, I don't wanna be right.

  7. #7
    Elite Member Chalet's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    13,082

    Default

    But I could change from the Blue Line at Vermont/Sunset and go to the Beverly Center! That place is crawling with celebs. Don't think for a minute they don't shop in malls.

  8. #8
    Elite Member Mr. Authority's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Royal Oak,MI
    Posts
    4,631

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Novice View Post
    For over five decades, Southern California had one of the most extensive rail transit networks in the world, with over 1,000 miles (1,600 km) of track operated by the Pacific Electric Railway (Red Cars) and Los Angeles Railway (Yellow Cars). The rail system was dismantled piecemeal in the years after World War II by a network of holding companies and intermediaries owned by a General Motors-led consortium as part of an effort to sell more buses and cars in what became known as the Great American streetcar scandal. In 1958, ownership of the system(s) fell to the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority, a government agency (a different agency from the current one with the same name), who presided over the final removal of the system during the late 1950's and early 1960's. By 1963, the last remaining Los Angeles streetcar lines were closed down and removed in favor of using automobiles on an extensive freeway system, with mass transit provided only by buses. In the decades that followed, the immense volume of traffic generated by the automobiles of 14 million people in the greater metropolitan area eventually led to renewed support for mass transit.
    Metro Rail (Los Angeles County) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



    Metro Rail is the rapid transit rail system consisting of five separate lines (the red, purple, blue, green, and gold lines) serving 70 stations in the Los Angeles County, California area. The new Expo line is due to enter service on April 28, 2012. It connects with the Metro liner bus rapid transit system (the orange line and silver line) and also with the Metrolink commuter rail systems. The system, which has a daily weekday ridership of approximately 350,000 as of July 2011,[1] is owned and operated by the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) and started service in 1990. It has been extended significantly since that time and several further extensions are either in the works or being considered.
    It is the indirect descendant of the Pacific Electric Red Car and Los Angeles Railway Yellow Car lines, which operated between the late 19th century and the 1960s.[2]
    Kind of reminds me of what General Motors did to the Detroit area. The city used to have streetcars that were ripped out and replaced with a bus system (that's woefully in shambles now) and the freeway system that cut through neighborhoods in Detroit (neighborhoods which just so happened to be mostly black at the time) to sell more cars. Now you can't go anywhere without a car here and if you travel by bus...good luck.

    At least L.A. has a heavy-rail system in place, Detroit can barely get it's buses in order, much less a heavy/light rail plan.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Pres. Obama outlines his plan for high-speed rail in the US
    By Grimmlok in forum U.S. Politics and Issues
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: April 17th, 2009, 04:45 PM
  2. Replies: 5
    Last Post: March 29th, 2008, 05:52 PM
  3. Victoria Silvstedt - Fake Fake Fake
    By SVZ in forum Plastic Surgery
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: December 1st, 2005, 05:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •