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Thread: Rudy Giuliani is really upset, confused about Beyonce’s ‘Black Power’ salute

  1. #46
    Elite Member ShimmeringGlow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalMarie View Post
    I didn't watch the Halftime Show or the Super Bowl... Does that make me a traitor to my country?

    But, I've heard the song and have seen the music video. I don't see the "controversy."
    It's a song with some pretty explicit lyrics and a pretty clear message.
    There are a lot of songs out there that are worse/more offensive. Regardless, if you don't like it or don't agree with it - don't listen to it. It's that simple.

    What I don't agree with is parts of her music video. Though as a whole, I think it's beautifully composed/shot, there's talk of Beyonce/her team "stealing" other people's footage. That I don't agree with.

    EDIT: It seems that a majority of the footage is from a specific documentary. And the maker/director of that documentary claims Beyonce's team did reach out, but the director denied access/use of the footage.
    Beyonce's team apparently gave no f*cks and put the footage in anyway... ?

    Here's the official music video from her YouTube channel.
    Disclaimer: It's labeled the "dirty" version - so the language/lyrics and/or some of the imagery might be NSFW:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LrCH...ature=youtu.be

    Side Note: I think Blue Ivy is starting to look more and more like her father...

    According to Beyoncé's people, the footage from the documentary was owned by Sundance and they gave/sold them the footage.

  2. #47
    Elite Member SoCalMarie's Avatar
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    "I got hot sauce in my bag, swag..."

    Why do I feel this ^ is going to start an entire movement of women (of all racial backgrounds) that will actually carry hot sauce around, just because they think Beyonce really does this?

    There are going to be a lot of ruined purses in the near future

    Hey Bey,
    I have a mini sriracha bottle on my belt-loop. That counts, right?

    Last edited by SoCalMarie; February 11th, 2016 at 07:38 PM.
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    Elite Member greysfang's Avatar
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    Haha, my mother always had hot sauce in her purse. It drove me nuts when I was a teen when she would take it out of her purse at restaurants.
    SoCalMarie, sluce, BITTER and 3 others like this.
    FUCK YOU AND GIVE ME MY GODDAMN VENTI TWO PUMP LIGHT WHIP MOCHA YOU COCKSUCKING WHORE BEFORE I PUNCH YOU IN THE MOUTH. I just get unpleasant in my car. - Deej

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    Elite Member SHELLEE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greysfang View Post
    Haha, my mother always had hot sauce in her purse. It drove me nuts when I was a teen when she would take it out of her purse at restaurants.
    Ha my friend Rosie does the same, well at least before she moved.
    See, Whores, we are good for something. Love, Florida
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  5. #50
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NickiDrea View Post
    I don't buy this black power stuff from Beyoncé. If she allegedly loves natural hair and black noses, why does she wear that hideous blonde weave all the time and why did she get surgery on her nose?

    That said, Jay Z isn't a thug. He is almost 50 years old. He committed crimes over 25 years ago. Since then, he has made $500 million dollars. He is a businessman. The Kennedys made a bunch of their money doing shady and illegal stuff and no one calls them thugs, just business people.
    I agree about the black power comment, its a very "fashionable" stance to take right now, and (as a European socialist/anti-facist) am admit to being somewhat disgusted (but unsurprised) at her "hijacking" of this to further her over popularity.

    Re her hair, I saw photos of her wearing plaits in Cuba and she looked beautiful. I hate the bleached straightened hair look and think that some of the most beautiful women I have seen are the ones who have celebrated their natural beauty and their differences, not followed the old stale cut-&-shunt Michael Jackson nose thing.
    But, bear in mind I'm middle European so my face is wider than it is long so I'm going to say that aren't I??? Lol!
    Quote Originally Posted by *Wookie-Chick* View Post
    Both Black Power AND White Power get a BIG OLD NOPE from me!

    They are both negative, alienating and promote hate and fear.
    Are you serious? No wonder you post any gods amount of depressive dreck.
    s the national anthem began playing, each man raised one gloved hand, and shaped it into a fist. Smith raised his right, Carlos his left.

    Together, the raised fists represented the unity their movement had.

    Neither man wore shoes, just black socks representing the poverty the black community faced. It also demonstrated the long walk to equality they were prepared to make.

    Smith wore a black scarf, to symbolise the pride and humility he and his race had.

    Accompanying the medal around his neck, Carlos wore beads:

    "They were for those individuals that were lynched, or killed that no one said a prayer for, that were hung and tarred. It was for those thrown off the side of the boats in the middle passage."

    Against Olympic protocol, both men unzipped their tracksuit tops -- a tribute to the struggle of the blue-collar worker everywhere.

    Both men bowed their heads as the Star Spangled Banner played. Boos echoed throughout the stadium when the music stopped and the athletes departed.

    Smith and Carlos were banned from further Olympic activities.

    Back home, they were subject to abuse and they and their families received death threats.

    Time magazine showed the five-ring Olympic logo with the words, "Angrier, Nastier, Uglier", instead of "Faster, Higher, Stronger".

    Tommie Smith later stated in his autobiography, "Silent Gesture", that the salute was not a Black Power salute, but in fact a human rights salute.
    Maybe you are confusing the Black Power movement with the Black Pathers who as Marxists were never going to be popular intye US.
    The Black Panthers - History Learning Site


    The salute itself dates back toancient Assyria (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raised_fist), I knew it from the Euro-political (communist/anti-facist) movements before I was aware of the Black Power movement.
    hustle4alivin and mostroop like this.

  6. #51
    Elite Member SoCalMarie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shimmeringglow View Post
    according to beyoncé's people, the footage from the documentary was owned by sundance and they gave/sold them the footage.
    Looks like it's turned into the typical "he said, she said..." scenario between Beyonce's team and the makers of the documentary....

    This is where I first found the information I wrote about in my previous post:
    (More info, including screen caps of twitter from the creators of the documentary commenting on the video at the source listed at the bottom of the quote)

    it seems like beyoncé's new "formation" video takes unauthorized footage from the 2013 documentary "that b.e.a.t."


    update (02/07/15 10:19 am): "that b.e.a.t." director chris black has revealed that beyoncé's team did try to license footage from his documentary last month, though he maintains a deal was never struck. The film's other director, abteen bagheri, apparently denied a request from those involved with "formation" to gain access to "that b.e.a.t." footage. A representative for beyoncé, however, tells a different story.
    In a statement shared by the new york times, beyoncé's rep explains that all footage taken from "that b.e.a.t." was obtained legally: "the documentary footage was used with permission and licensed from the owner of the footage. They were given proper compensation. The footage was provided to us by the filmmaker’s production company. The filmmaker is listed in the credits for additional photography direction. We are thankful that they granted us permission."

    source: Beyoncé's "Formation" Video Allegedly Steals Documentary Footage
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  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novice View Post

    Are you serious? No wonder you post any gods amount of depressive dreck.
    Depressive dreck?.. wow nice, thanks.

  8. #53
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by *Wookie-Chick* View Post
    Depressive dreck?.. wow nice, thanks.
    Well, I appreciate that you are one of the few people that post but its all XXX has died and RIP such-abd-such; no funny posts, no rappers or sports men or anything just a narrow, narrow band.
    Just my opinion, others my like what you post.
    msdeb likes this.

  9. #54
    Elite Member SoCalMarie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greysfang View Post
    Haha, my mother always had hot sauce in her purse. It drove me nuts when I was a teen when she would take it out of her purse at restaurants.
    A friend of mine really does carry that mini sriracha bottle around in her purse.
    Another one of my friends collects and carries around tiny one-use tabasco bottles.

    The Sriracha bottle girl has definitely ruined a couple of her purses with it accidentally opening.
    And it's hard not to laugh when she handles it, then touches her face for some reason, rubs her eye or something and it starts burning... There's some form of hot/spicy sauce everywhere we eat and she still insists on carting that sriracha.

    I can say, it burns less than the pepper spray I used to carry in my purse. No matter the brand or the "case" - those darn things still leaked and touching anything in my purse became instant fire. No bueno... I've learned my lesson with "spicy" liquids in my purse.

    Anyway...
    Last edited by SoCalMarie; February 13th, 2016 at 01:57 PM. Reason: I Haz Spelling Issuez
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    Elite Member Moongirl's Avatar
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    My husband (and probably every Mexican we know) plants chili pepper plants every year. He'll eat them fresh, some get frozen to use in green salsa, and others get dried for use in red salsa. If we go out to eat, or are invited to a birthday party, BBQ, etc., he'll take along little ziploc bag of fresh chiles, usually in my purse, to eat along with his food. People will even ask him if he brought any chiles, lol! Again, it's pretty common among Mexicans to do so...
    SoCalMarie and BITTER like this.

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    Elite Member Kittylady's Avatar
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    An absolute essential in my cupboards is Encona West Indian Hot Sauce. I sneak it into as many dishes as possible and use it a dip. I love fiery food but the other half regularly accuses me of trying to poison him with with my little 'tweaks' to food. I think he's just a wimp.
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  12. #57
    Elite Member sluce's Avatar
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    OMG - SNL is killing it with a skit called "The Day Beyoncé Turned Black!"
    Last edited by sluce; February 14th, 2016 at 11:19 AM.
    greysfang, SHELLEE and dilligaf like this.
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    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    They were fox news watchers??? ∆



    Beyoncé: the superstar who brought black power to the Super Bowl

    With her spectacular intervention in front of millions of TV viewers, Beyoncé brought radical politics to mainstream pop. What is behind her journey to the heart of the new civil rights movement?
    Beyoncé leads her dancers on the Super Bowl field.
    Beyoncé leads her dancers on the Super Bowl field. Photograph: Ezra Shaw/Getty Images
    Barbara Ellen

    Barbara Ellen

    Sunday 14 February 2016 00.05 GMT
    Last modified on Sunday 14 February 2016 00.06 GMT

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    It could be considered deeply ironic that a group plans this week to protest outside the National Football League’s headquarters in New York against Beyoncé’s “racist” half-time performance at the Super Bowl. For the performance was all about the new-style protests against racial discrimination that have been surging through America, in the form of civil rights grassroots movements such as Black Lives Matter.

    If it goes ahead, the demonstration will protest about … another protest: a far larger, infinitely more important one, dealing with what it means to be black in America, the kind that doesn’t fit neatly outside the NFL’s HQ.

    One consequence of Beyoncé’s performance is a shift in the way she’s being framed in some quarters. One description of the Super Bowl event I keep seeing is “unapologetically black”. This alludes to the dancers in Black Panther berets performing black power salutes, arranging themselves into the letter “X” for Malcolm, and the homemade sign (said to be unscripted), demanding “Justice for Mario Woods”, the victim of a San Francisco police shooting whose case has been a BLM rallying point.
    The Anti-Beyoncé Protest Rally – who's racist now?
    Read more

    Then there’s the song “Formation” (a surprise release and Beyoncé’s first in 14 months), and the accompanying video (using footage from the New Orleans music documentary That B.E.A.T). In it she references, among other things, Black Lives Matter, civil rights generally, slogans such as “Stop shooting us”, riot police, the shamefully sluggish official response to Hurricane Katrina (where poor, predominantly black lives were clearly deemed not to matter). “I like my baby hair and afros. I like my Negro nose with Jackson 5 nostrils, ” she states.
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    Employing words and visuals to gritty and poetic effect – cleverly eschewing blunt aggression, the key accent is languid, dream-like menace – the message of “Formation” pounds through, like an elegant, detailed, modern civil rights seminar. It’s an education, if you will, on the black American experience, past and present.

    At this point, even long-time fans of Beyoncé (and I’m one of them) could be forgiven for wondering how she got here? How did one of the globe’s consummate mainstream superstars manage to reposition herself as a lightning rod for radical politicised black America?

    The answer: in some ways, yes, arriving here is surprising; in others, not so much. The element of surprise mainly relates to Beyoncé’s carefully plotted and executed long game as an artist – from her beginnings, managed by her father, Mathew, as the blatant main draw in Destiny’s Child, through to her film appearances in the likes of Dream Girls and Cadillac Records, and, most notably, her instant stellar success with early solo albums such as Dangerously in Love, the rather unfortunately named B’Day, and I Am … Sasha Fierce (introducing her alter ego).

    In hindsight, there’s always a danger that such achievements could start to look pre-ordained, when of course they were anything but. While Beyoncé’s dance moves (and thighs) had their own wow-factor (as evidenced in the video for “Crazy in Love”), she should be given due credit for becoming a crossover artist in excelsis.
    Black Pride at the Super Bowl? Beyoncé embodies a new political moment
    Suzanne Moore
    Read more

    Always a “black” artist, firmly entrenched in high-grade R&B, soul, hip-hop, roots and disco – her Super Bowl costume was said to be an homage to Michael Jackson – Beyoncé was never going to end up as a backing singer. Her undoubted talent was long fuelled by a determination to be placed where she deserved to be, firmly centre-stage, at the heart of the mainstream.
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    Sometimes, this could lead to artistic stiffness – a live show I saw, while amazing, occasionally exuded the distinctly corporate “on-message” feel peculiar to certain superstars who cannot bear to tear their eyes off the main prize, even when, as artists, they should be immersed in the moment.

    Other accusations levelled at Beyoncé include a success/money-obsession (even in “Formation” she says “best revenge is your paper”), although a counter-accusation could be some people’s obsession with portraying uber-consumerism as a black-only trope.

    Beyoncé has also been criticised for being a bad feminist, although I’m not so sure about that. “Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)” had a comically dodgy theme, but, from early on, Beyoncé was thanking feminism for giving her confidence in life and relationships. Similarly, to those complaining that Beyoncé’s scantily clad, hip-thrusting performance at the Super Bowl was “hardly Bob Dylan”, it’s a different genre, sweeties (do try to keep up). Besides, sneering at the mode of protest rather than examining what the protest is about is an old method of silencing and cowing.

    Then there were the recurring accusations that she looked as if she might have undergone a process to lighten her skin – no proof was ever offered. Both in person, and in adverts such as those for L’Oréal, she’s been criticised for looking “too white” and contributing to young black girls’ anxiety over their appearance, or at least not helping matters. On the face of it, from there to the “Jackson 5 nostrils” sentiments of “Formation” does seem quite a leap.

    Mind you, is it really so surprising, or just more overt? Did Beyoncé seem any less proudly “Black with a capital B” when she was singing “At Last” to the Obamas at their inauguration dance? Or when she (and her husband, Jay Z) endured people moaning ridiculously about their headlining slots not being right for “rock festival” Glastonbury? Was Beyoncé any less politicised when she and Kelly Rowland started a charity to help the Hurricane Katrina survivors? Or when she and Jay Z donated generously to civil rights charities? There also appears to be a multifaceted timing element at play. It’s the 50th anniversary of the formation of the Black Panther party. “Formation” was released on what would have been the 21st birthday of Trayvon Martin (another high profile police-shooting and BLM cause). Barack Obama is an outgoing president, while Donald Trump (and the Donald Trump mindset) is dominating the headlines.
    Beyoncé's Formation reclaims black America's narrative from the margins
    Syreeta McFadden
    Read more

    There’s the recent Oscars row and a growing restlessness in the music industry, with Nicki Minaj, for one, being extremely vocal about black under-representation. (Ever savvy to changing trends, Beyoncé’s eponymously titled previous album already heralded an edgier direction in her musical style). Moreover, there’s Beyoncé’s “personal timing” – a mother in her mid-30s, she wouldn’t be the first woman to become more politically aware and active as she became older. Then, of course, there’s the other kind of timing relating to the genius marketing ploy of surprise-releasing a song, causing a huge global rumpus at the Super Bowl (also starring, lest we forget, Bruno Mars and Coldplay), then announcing your 40-date world tour straight afterwards.

    It’s possible to admire her business acumen (not so much “I have a dream” as “I have a tour to promote”) and at the same time acknowledging that perhaps only someone such as Beyoncé, with a powerful international reach, could have made such an enormous zeitgeist-ruffling impact.

    Beyoncé also risked something very real regarding her mainstream persona. Not only among those prone to panic when confronted by politics, but more generally. After all, with a single performance, she has become as synonymous with black rights as film director, Spike Lee, was in the 1980s. Which, in turn, ties in to the interesting debate about why black success is so often viewed as a tangled fraught compromise between cultures, when white success can just be success?

    Why does Beyoncé have to choose to represent or not represent “her” culture, when, say, Madonna isn’t required to bang on about being an Italian Catholic the whole time?

    In this instance, Beyoncé chose to represent a cause, and in great style. Should it go ahead, the NFL protest is going to seem a mite underwhelming considering what black activists have been protesting about.
    Beyoncé sings in Destiny’s Child in 2000.
    Beyoncé sings in Destiny’s Child in 2000. Photograph: Startraks Photo/REX
    THE BEYONCE FILE

    Born Beyoncé Giselle Knowles in Houston, Texas on 4 September, 1981. Her mother worked as a hairdresser and salon owner and her father was a Xerox sales manager. She began singing and dancing in local talent shows at an early age and attended a specialist music school, Parker Elementary School.

    By her early teens she was performing with Kelly Rowlands, LaTavia Roberson and LeToya Luckett in Girl’s Tyme, which was later to become Destiny’s Child. Married to Jay Z with one daughter, Blue Ivy.

    Best of times Her 2003 album Dangerously in Love established her as a solo artist worldwide, picking up five Grammy Awards.

    Worst of times Splitting from her long-time manager, her father, in 2011. Mathew Knowles had managed her career since she auditioned as a teen. Knowles insisted it was a business decision and not related to his divorce from Beyoncé’s mother, Tina.

    What she says “I’m over being a pop star. I don’t wanna be a hot girl. I wanna be iconic.”

    What others say “The most important and compelling popular musician of the 21st century.” Jody Rosen, The New Yorker music critic

  14. #59
    Elite Member SoCalMarie's Avatar
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    Born Beyoncé Giselle Knowles in Houston, Texas on 4 September, 1981.
    Come on Fox news, get your facts straight for once...
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    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    this whole controversy is bullshit and i don't know a single person outraged by beyoncé's performance. i think it's faux outrage manufactured by fox news and then faux outrage at the faux outrage manufactured by the left and more specifically left wing blogs.

    Quote Originally Posted by NickiDrea View Post
    I don't buy this black power stuff from Beyoncé. If she allegedly loves natural hair and black noses, why does she wear that hideous blonde weave all the time and why did she get surgery on her nose?

    That said, Jay Z isn't a thug. He is almost 50 years old. He committed crimes over 25 years ago. Since then, he has made $500 million dollars. He is a businessman. The Kennedys made a bunch of their money doing shady and illegal stuff and no one calls them thugs, just business people.
    agree on both points.

    Quote Originally Posted by sluce View Post
    I just sent a message to all my Jewish and Italian friends who had nose jobs, letting them know they can no longer support their cultural causes.
    but are they going around pointing at their little surgeried noses and saying how much they love their original Jewish and Italian noses? you have to admit, those lyrics are slightly perplexing coming from a woman who wore a wig even in her l'oréal hair colour commercial.
    NickiDrea likes this.
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