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Thread: Robin Williams dead

  1. #361
    Elite Member stef's Avatar
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    Robin Williams' widow goes to court to stop his children from taking their father's things from the home where he committed suicide

    • Susan Schneider has filed an injunction seeking to bar his children from taking anything from his house in Tiburon, California
    • Zachary, Zelda and Cody are owed their father's memorabilia and belongings under his $50million will
    • They say step-mother Susan is 'adding insult to terrible injury'
    • Schneider says items have already been taking from the home where Williams killed himself last August

    By Michael Zennie For Daily Mail Online and Associated Press
    Published: 07:01 GMT, 30 March 2015 | Updated: 14:32 GMT, 30 March 2015
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    Robin Williams' widow Susan Schneider and his children are due in court today in a nasty legal battle over the comedian's clothes and other personal items he kept in the house where he committed suicide last August.
    Susan wants to bar Zachary, Zelda and Cody from taking anything that was in their father's Tiburon, California, home - claiming it all belongs to her.
    She also says some of Williams' personal items were taken from his home without her permission.
    The children say that their step-mother - the actor's third wife - is 'adding insult to a terrible injury' by trying to change the trust and rob them of the late actor's possessions.
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    Susan Schneider is due in court on Monday in an attempt to stop her late husband Robin Williams' children from taking things out of his house in Tiburon, California. Susan is seen with Williams and his daughter Zelda (right) in 2011



    Zack and Zelda (pictured), along with little brother Cody are fighting their step-mother Susan over access to their father's personal belongings

    As per the actor's will, his three grown children - age 31, 25 and 23 - will get most of his jewelry, memorabilia and other belongings, including his awards.
    However, Susan Williams is asking a judge to exclude the belongings in their 'marital home' in Tiburon from the list of belongings the children are allowed to take.
    Most of Williams' $50million estate goes to his children. Susan, who married Williams in 2011, had a prenup agreement that gives her a slice of his fortune and the home outside San Francisco, where he killed himself on August 11.
    Susan Williams' attorney said she was only seeking guidance from the court about the meaning of certain terms in the trust.


    Williams' children; Zachary (second from left), Cody (third from left) and Zelda (right) pictured with Williams' ex-wife Marsha (second from right); say their step-mother's legal action is 'adding insult to terrible injury'



    Schnieder's lawyer says he's only hoping for a judge to clarify Williams' $50million will

    Williams died at his home in Tiburon north of San Francisco in August. The coroner ruled his death a suicide that resulted from asphyxia caused by hanging.
    Susan Williams has said the actor and comedian was struggling with depression, anxiety and a recent diagnosis of Parkinson's disease.
    Williams' trust granted his children his memorabilia and awards in the entertainment industry among other particular personal items, according to court documents.
    Susan Williams says that because he wanted her to continue to live at the Tiburon home, it makes sense that he intended only for his children to have the specific personal items he delineated that were kept at another home he owned in Napa.
    The two sides also disagree over items put in storage, watches Williams owned and his memorabilia.

    Robin Williams' wife, children head to court in estate fight | Daily Mail Online
    "This is not meant to be at all offensive: You suffer from diarrhea of the mouth but constipation of the brain." - McJag

  2. #362
    Elite Member gas_chick's Avatar
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    She needs to give those kids what they were willed no matter where it is currently being kept.
    I am going to come and burn the fucking house down... but you will blow me first."

  3. #363
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    This type of thing boils my blood. Those are Robin's children, his children! That dumb bitch was married to him for what, three years?? And furthermore the will states that those things belong to the kids anyway, where does this woman get off attempting to usurp their belongings??
    If anything good has come from this tragedy its that it brings further awareness to how important it is to do estate planning. Write that will people!
    "You'll have to speak up, I'm wearing a towel."

  4. #364
    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
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    What a bitch.
    Warren Beatty: actor, director, writer, producer.

    ***** celeb

  5. #365
    czb
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    ok - this has gotten a lot of coverage over the past few months since it is local.

    her perspective is not really covered in that last news post. she maintains that the napa house was the house the kids knew best (it was robin's prior to this last marriage) and the tiburon house was the house that she and robin bought after they were married. so she thinks that the items in the napa house is fair game for the kids, it is stuff from the tib house she is questioning. plus it sounds like the kids were coming in to the tib house when she was not there and taking things. not sure what the answer is, but it seems reasonable that if she and the kids can't figure it out, then it should be mediated. not sure that means it has to be heard by a judge, but for whatever reason, that's the route they picked.

  6. #366
    fgg
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    the kids should get what is rightfully willed to them but they have no right to enter a house that doesn't belong to them, whether they plan on taking things or not. we just take for granted that we can walk in & out of our parents' house.
    can't post pics because my computer's broken and i'm stupid

  7. #367
    czb
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    ok - that's the issue. the will did not specify which items were theirs (the kids) and at the time the will was drafted, the only house that existed was the napa house.

    i think the wife is cool with them taking stuff, but not when she is not in the house. and i think she would like some memorabilia as well. so i think it's easy to say she is a bitch, but she has a valid point. but it seems like something for mediators to decide, not the court.
    Last edited by czb; March 30th, 2015 at 02:39 PM. Reason: fix an error
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  8. #368
    Elite Member llamamama's Avatar
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    I'm curious what types of things they took. I can see if the kids went into the Tiburon house and started taking furniture, TV's, cookware, towels and stuff like that, she has a right to be upset. But if it's what he said in the will, memoribilia, jewelry, personal belongings, awards then it's theirs not matter what house it was kept in. If for example, his Mork spacesuit was kept in the Tiburon house, she thinks it's hers? No friggin' way. But if they went into her kitchen and said, "Dad really wanted me to have this coffee maker." then...

    She has a right to be there when they remove stuff, it's her house.

  9. #369
    czb
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    let me see if i can pull up the original article, not sure if it did elaborate on exactly what they took ....

    here you go:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/03/mo...tate.html?_r=0
    Nearly six months after the death of Robin Williams, the Academy Award-winning actor and comedian, his widow and his children have become engaged in a contentious legal dispute over his estate.
    Court documents filed in December and January outline a bitter disagreement over money and property between the widow, Susan Schneider Williams, who was Mr. Williams’s third wife, and Zak, Zelda and Cody Williams, the comedian’s children from two previous marriages that ended in divorce.
    At stake is not only a portion of the wealth that Mr. Williams accumulated in a film, television and stage career of some 40 years, but also cherished belongings that include his clothing, collectibles and personal photographs.
    Continue reading the main story

    In their court papers, both sides display keen interest in such memorabilia — everything from Mr. Williams’s bicycles to his collections of fossils and toys — as tangible, deeply personal reminders of the irrepressible, manic imagination that drove his performances as a comedian and actor.

    The documents show a fragile family still striving for closure after Mr. Williams committed suicide at his home in Tiburon, Calif., on Aug. 11 at the age of 63. They also reveal a schism between Mrs. Williams, who married Mr. Williams in 2011 and is a relative newcomer to the family, and his children, who are closely knit and were a highly visible part of his personal life.
    In legal papers filed just before Christmas in San Francisco, lawyers for Mrs. Williams presented her view as to what she is entitled to from the estate. This petition complained that some property was “unilaterally removed” from their home “days after Mr. Williams’s untimely death.”
    Then, when she sought legal representation, “certain home-related services were canceled,” like newspaper delivery, according to the papers filed in California Superior Court.
    Allan Mayer, a spokesman for the Williams children, said Monday in an email, “Notwithstanding Ms. Schneider Williams’s insinuations, the fact is that neither the Williams children nor any representative of theirs has been in the house or had anything taken from it since Robin Williams’s tragic death.”
    Continue reading the main story
    The papers filed by Mrs. Williams assert that, since she lost “her husband through a shocking and emotionally charged event,” she has not been “given time to grieve her loss free from the frenetic efforts to interfere with her domestic tranquillity.”
    Mr. Williams’s children — Zak, 31, his son by his first wife, Valerie Velardi; and Zelda, 25, and Cody, 23, his daughter and son by his second wife, Marsha Garces Williams — filed their response in January.
    They say in their filing that they “are heartbroken” that Susan Schneider Williams — who they note was married to their father for “less than three years” — has “acted against his wishes by challenging the plans he so carefully made for his estate.”
    Mrs. Williams’s petition, the children’s legal papers say, adds “insult to a terrible injury” and is a premature attempt to alter Mr. Williams’s instructions and “prevent them from receiving what their father wanted them to receive.”
    Continue reading the main story
    The actor said in his will, filed in Marin County, Calif., that he left his estate in its entirety to a trust whose beneficiaries included his three children.
    This trust was updated in recent years with further provisions for Mrs. Williams, a painter and graphic designer who has two teenage sons of her own. Mrs. Williams also signed a prenuptial agreement with Mr. Williams in 2011, though it is unclear what assets it granted or denied her.
    Under the terms of the updated trust, Mrs. Williams was to be provided her own separate trust, the Susan Trust, which included the Tiburon home and “the contents thereof,” subject to certain restrictions. She would also be given enough cash or property to cover, for her lifetime, “all costs related to the residence.”
    Mrs. Williams’s petition states that this should include “all expenses associated with daily upkeep as well as unexpected renovations and improvements.”
    In their response, the Williams children faulted Mrs. Williams for appearing to be arguing for additional funds before the Susan Trust had even been funded. They cite this as an illustration of “the greed that appears to be driving petitioner’s actions.”
    Jim Wagstaffe, a lawyer for Mrs. Williams, said in a telephone interview on Monday that his client was “not somebody who has any sticky fingers.”
    “Mr. Williams wanted his wife to be able to stay in her home and not be disrupted in her life with her children,” he added. “Compared to what the Williams children were set to receive from their father, this is a bucket of water in a lake.”
    Much of the dispute is focused on how the estate should distribute Mr. Williams’s personal effects, both from his days as an entertainer and as a family man. Mr. Williams won numerous awards, including an Oscar for his performance in “Good Will Hunting,” six Golden Globes, two Emmys and five Grammys.
    The updated trust specified that all of Mr. Williams’s “clothing, jewelry, personal photos taken prior to his marriage to Susan,” his “memorabilia and awards in the entertainment industry,” as well as additional property he kept at a second home in Napa, Calif., were to be given to his children.
    Mrs. Williams acknowledged in her legal papers that she had no claim to items like the distinctive suspenders her husband wore on “Mork & Mindy,” because they are “related to Mr. Williams’s acting career in the entertainment industry.” But she said that she should be entitled to other items, like the tuxedo that he wore at their wedding, as well as “Mr. Williams’s personal collections of knickknacks and other items that are not associated with his famous persona.”
    In their response, the Williams children took offense at the use of “knickknacks” to describe their father’s accumulation of graphic novels, action figures, theater masks, movie posters and other artifacts that they regard as having been crucial fuel for his seemingly boundless creativity.
    “These collections were carefully amassed by Mr. Williams over his lifetime and were precious to him,” the response says. “As the Williams children grew, so did their father’s collections and they shared in their father’s excitement as additions were made to his collection.”
    Continue reading the main story Continue reading the main story
    Continue reading the main story
    The breach within Mr. Williams’s family had not been visible after his suicide. But the legal papers make clear that any spirit of cooperation between Mrs. Williams and the children of her husband was tattered within weeks of his death.
    Her lawyers say in the court papers that, in September, she was given only three days’ notice by the trustees of the main trust of their intention to remove home items they believed had been bequeathed to the children.
    Mrs. Williams, asserting that she “became frightened of the co-trustees invading her home,” blocked their access.
    The children countered that Mrs. Williams has continued to block their access to the Tiburon home, even as she has allowed others inside. Those others included appraisers who estimated the value of items that the children contend are rightfully theirs and workers who helped design and complete a $30,000 renovation, the court papers contend.
    What both sides may still share is the desire, as the Williams children say in their court papers, to resolve any potential disputes “as quickly and efficiently as possible, to allow them to privately grieve the loss of their father and begin to heal from this tragic event.”
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  10. #370
    Elite Member llamamama's Avatar
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    ^ Well, I guess we have to reserve judgement until we we see who the first one is to auction off his stuff.
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    We just went through this scenario. My brother died, leaving everything to his daughter. He was living with a horrible woman at the time in her home. She told my niece she would have her over a few weeks after he died so she could take what she wanted. But, 2 weeks after he died she had already sold off anything of value and told my niece that possession was 9/10 of the law and she couldn't prove who owned the items. It was only a few thousand and not worth the fight. I was proud when my niece looked the bitch in the eye and told her "I'm fine with you selling his stuff because I already have the important stuff. He never moved it into your house, and he left me all the life insurance." We have had NO contact with the woman since.
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  12. #372
    czb
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    yuck, that sounds awful.

    hope the williams family doesn't have a similar experience. wills can bring out the worst in people.
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    Quote Originally Posted by llamamama View Post
    ^ Well, I guess we have to reserve judgement until we we see who the first one is to auction off his stuff.
    Nailed it.
    "Shopping tip: You can get shoes for a buck at the bowling alley."

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    Robin Williams Family Agrees to Settle Dispute

    Attorneys for the wife and adult children of Robin Williams have agreed to try to resolve their dispute out of court involving personal items of the late actor.
    Attorneys in the case agreed Monday in San Francisco Superior Court to meet informally before April 10 on the matter.



    Attorney Jim Wagstaffe told the court that Williams' wife, Susan Williams, would like to keep her wedding presents, the tuxedo Williams wore at their wedding, and photographs from his 60th birthday.
    Attorney Meredith Bushnell, who is representing the children from previous marriages, said the dispute has been excruciating for them, and they would like to resolve it as soon as possible.
    The children say Williams' trust clearly granted them his clothing, jewelry and personal photos taken prior to his marriage to Susan Williams.
    — The Associated Press


  15. #375
    Elite Member SHELLEE's Avatar
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    Hopefully mediation will work for them.
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