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Thread: Peaches Geldof dies aged 25

  1. #421
    Gold Member Merlot-N-Bali's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Annika View Post
    amytriptyline, i think it's called, i was prescribed it a couple of years ago it made me feel sick and really tired, i was taken off it. i was also given a wafer type drug called maxalt i think, from a neurologist... but the side effects freaked the hell outta me, so i wouldn't take it...

    i'm going to try to find some liquid magnesium or a crunchy kind i can smash up and put in my tube feed.

    ps. rest in peaches, peaches...
    Annika, you can buy magnesium in a powder that can be mixed in with liquids, might work with your tube feeds. The kind I buy is called Natural Calm, Amazon has it.
    "You should've never trusted Hollywood..."

  2. #422
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Aw! Y'all are so nice, I really like the way we all pitch in to try & help each other out. I'm sure that we'll all get back to being cunts soon enough.....

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarzy View Post
    I was on Amitryptyline for years and didn't have any side effects or withdrawal when I stopped it. People can react so differently to the same drug, you can't really go by anyone else's experience.
    I know, I took 2x tramadol every 4 hours (to the extent that people with me would be counting the minutes from 3.5 for me) and it never really started to work until I'd taken 6 (i.e. Approx 4pm) it just didn't work with my body chemistry, pure codeine, another matter entirely - unfortunately I was given tramadol as a substitute for the codeine due to (their/nhs not mine) addiction issues. Amphetamine-types are the same, very limited effects.


    Quote Originally Posted by Kittylady View Post
    ^^ That's why I said it can be wonderful or it can be hell. For some people it can drastically improve their quality of life, while for others... I had nothing but shit on Seroxat while others have soared through it and out the other side.
    I don't think I've met anyone that was good with Seroxat - my ex-husband remained suicidal & depressed on it with the added issue of stomach problems....
    Quote Originally Posted by She's a Rainbow View Post
    Hmm, this discussion about Maxalt is interesting. I took it for years as well because of my migraines. I can see that it could lead to addiction..gave me a very loose, light feeling. That was probably 7 years ago so it would probably affect me differently now.
    Damn! Yet another drug that I'm doing wrong..... Mind, I have such a high pain threshold & am so stubborn that the 2nd day after major surgery (inc morphine pump after) that I refused pain meds because "it didn't hurt that much", the sister was worried until she saw my chart & then justice sure that I knew that there were some with the nurses station if I needed them. By that point I was still jetlagged so sat with the nurses drinking tea & reading gossip mags @ 3am. I'd only got back from LA the day I was admitted....
    "I don't know what I am to them, maybe a penguin XD" - Tiny Pixie

  3. #423
    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    I guess unlucky for me that I don't get any kind of high from the triptans. Just works on my damn headaches!!
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  4. #424
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Lol! Join the club!
    I guess it must also depend on the amount of pain one is in as well as body chemistry & maybe weight???
    "I don't know what I am to them, maybe a penguin XD" - Tiny Pixie

  5. #425
    Elite Member Kittylady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novice View Post
    I don't think I've met anyone that was good with Seroxat - my ex-husband remained suicidal & depressed on it with the added issue of stomach problems....
    I was put on it for mild panic attacks and went downhill fast quite soon after starting it (panic attacks got MUCH worse, constant anxiety, weight gain, creeping self harm impulses etc etc) but of course when I went back to the quack they said I wasn't taking enough and upped the dosage... I was a bloody wreck. After I finally got it through to them that it didn't suit me I ended up on Venlafaxine until I weaned myself off those as well (which was even worse than stopping Seroxat).

    I'm very wary about taking prescription meds now and always dig around the net before starting a course of anything I've never had before.
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  6. #426
    Elite Member Annika's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kittylady View Post
    I was put on it for mild panic attacks and went downhill fast quite soon after starting it (panic attacks got MUCH worse, constant anxiety, weight gain, creeping self harm impulses etc etc) but of course when I went back to the quack they said I wasn't taking enough and upped the dosage... I was a bloody wreck. After I finally got it through to them that it didn't suit me I ended up on Venlafaxine until I weaned myself off those as well (which was even worse than stopping Seroxat).

    I'm very wary about taking prescription meds now and always dig around the net before starting a course of anything I've never had before.

    i do that too, i always look up the drug they want to put me on then freak out over the horror stories people write of side effects. that's why i didn't take the maxalt. at the time my dad had a heart attack and the cardiologist lectured me about smoking and having his genes, yadayada, and then when i read maxalt can cause chest pain etc i was way too freaked out to take it. i really thought it would give me a heart attack or something. and i KNOW because i have anxiety if i did take it my brain would give me chest pain and i would blame it on the drug. that's kinda why i don't mind the codeine. it really relaxes me and takes away a lot of my anxiety.

  7. #427
    Elite Member yanna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by She's a Rainbow View Post
    Hmm, this discussion about Maxalt is interesting. I took it for years as well because of my migraines. I can see that it could lead to addiction..gave me a very loose, light feeling. That was probably 7 years ago so it would probably affect me differently now.
    OMG, that's it exactly. That's exactly what I get from Imigran. A bit like I have cotton wool between my brain and my skull. It's very nice.
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  8. #428
    Elite Member levitt's Avatar
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    I've just started on B Complex and that feels like enough for me, I take two a day if I'm going to the gym and I'm wired! Any of these and I'd probably be crawling up the walls.
    Ain't nothing wrong with Ohio wang! - MontanaMama

  9. #429
    Elite Member rollo's Avatar
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    Drug addiction, overdoses, and a very brief history of heroin








    How the drug originally marketed as a cough medicine became one of the most addictive recreational habits of our times



    JENN SELBY


    Thursday 08 May 2014


    Rarely have public sympathies towards an individual changed quite so dramatically as when the preliminary inquest into the sudden passing of Peaches Geldof was revealed last week.

    During the 10-minute hearing, the coroner Roger Hatch determined that the levels of heroin found in her body had played a ‘likely’ part in her death.
    This led many to question why a millionaire mother-of-two with a self-professed “perfect life” and every chance at a successful future had turned to the Class A drug - ordinarily associated with those who, under emotional and environmental strain, reject society's goals and institutionalised means of achieving them - in order to get by.
    Some cited the inner sense of sadness that she continued to live with following the death of her mother, Paula Yates, in 2000. Some said that she became dependent, and had regularly attended rehabilitation appointments, unbeknown to her “straight, family man” husband, Thomas Cohen. Others, that in a particularly low moment, she’d rekindled her relationship with an old demon and simply misjudged the strength; her tolerance levels lowered after months of abstinence.
    Until the full inquest into her death is heard in July – and indeed if ever – we have no way of knowing whether there is any truth in that speculation. What we do know, however, is that all of the above is entirely characteristic of anyone dependent on heroin.

    Peaches Geldof - a life in pictures
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      • Users have described an intense, pleasurable rush and an acute transcendent state of euphoria after the Class A substance, which occurs after diacetylmorphine – heroin’s chemical name – is nto morphine in the brain. That sense of escapism and dulling of physical and emotional pain goes some way to explaining why anyone would choose to experiment with the highly addictive drug in the first place.


    “I cannot accurately convey the efficiency of heroin in neutralising pain,” rehabilitation campaigner Russell Brand wrote in an article forThe Spectator last year. He was writing following the death of his friend, Amy Winehouse, herself a Heroin addict. “It transforms a tight white fist into a gentle brown wave, and from my first inhalation 15 years ago it fumigated my private hell.”
    Far from its ‘one shot kills all’ reputation, there are actually very few long-term biological complications caused by unadulterated heroin use, other than dependency and constipation. The trouble arises with the purity of the drug – estimated to be between 30% and 50% at street level in the UK – and the way it can be administered.
    Intravenous use, for example, is riddled with risks. Contracting blood-borne pathogens like HIV, bacterial infections, abscesses and more could all affect those using and sharing needles. Meanwhile, the likelihood of overdose is significantly raised in those returning to heroin after a period of avoidance. Tolerance decreases over time, occasionally leading those relapsing to overestimate the amount needed to achieve the desired, previous effect. Fatalities are often caused by those combining Heroin with other depressant drugs, like alcohol or Valium.
    And then there are the harrowing consequences of attempting to come off the drug – the agonising withdrawals, the sweating, the vomiting and hallucinations. Oh, and the loss of friends, family, careers, and the inability to care for anyone, or about anything, least of all yourself.
    Needless to say, the latter has rightly transformed the reputation of Heroin – one of the few street drugs still known by its initial brand name – from a terribly embarrassing chemical blunder first made by a German pharmaceutical company in the 1800s, to one of the most controversial narcotics in modern times.
    So, as it slowly edges its way back into popular use, riding on a tidal wave of 90s revivalism, take a very brief look at its history, from over-the-counter cough medicine to illegal killer:

    • Heroin – the chemical name for which is diacetylmorphine – was originally synthesized by British chemist C.R.Alder Wright (pictured below) in 1874, by adding two acetyl groups to the molecule morphine, which is naturally found in the opium poppy.



    • Bayer, the German pharmaceutical company behind Alka-Seltzer and Aspirin, bought the rights to diacetylmorphine, marketing it under the name “Heroin” in 1895 because early testers said that it made them feel “heroisch” or “heroic”.
    • By 1898, it was ready for mass marketing. It was originally sold as an over-the-counter cough suppressant that didn’t have problematic side effects, like addiction (the irony) - while alternative treatments morphine and codeine did. This was before they realised that, when taken into the body, it actually converts into morphine, and is ferociously addictive. Thus defeating the object and defining what was to become a historically embarrassing moment for the company in later years.



    • In 1899, Bayer was producing over a ton of Heroin and exporting the drug to 23 countries, while free samples sent to doctors and studies appeared in medical journals. It was also around this time that early reports of addiction began to surface. The company wisely released Aspirin the same year, a non-addictive alternative that would go on to become one of the most popular and widely used pain relief drugs in the world.
    • US medicines containing heroin were available over the counter from 1907, after the American Medical Association gave it its stamp of approval.



    • In 1914, as dependency became a torrent and overdoses began to be reported with greater frequency, heroin was made illegal to obtain without a prescription from a doctor in the US. Bayer lost some of its trademark rights to heroin and Aspirin under the Treaty Of Versailles in 1919, after the German defeat in World War I.
    • In the early 1920s, a number of addicted users in New York supported themselves by collecting and selling scrap metal retrieved from industrial dumps. It was from this that the label “junkies” was born.The behavior of heroin addicts was soon, however, to cause a concern to the public and the authorities. In 1924, it became completely illegal, and doctors were told they could no longer prescribe the drug.
    • By this point, heroin had become popular among creative industries. Pictured below is famed actress Jeanne Eagels, who died of a Heroin overdose in 1929. Its outlawed use had pushed manufacturers underground, and the purity of the product illegal traders now used varied in quality, though were plentifully supplied by still functioning and legal chemical companies in western Europe.



    • In the UK, the Rolleston Committee Report in 1926 made heroin illegal and ruled that dealers were to be prosecuted, but doctors could prescribe diacetylmorphine to users when they were withdrawing from it, if it would cause harm or severe distress to the patient to go without it. This would be the law until 1959when the number of diacetylmorphine addicts doubled every 16 months between 1959 and 1968.
    • The Brain Committee recommended that only selected, specially approved doctors at specialised centres were allowed to prescribe diacetylmorphine to users in 1964. The law was further restricted in 1968, and by the 1970s, the emphasis shifted to encouraging abstinence and the use of substitute methadone.



    • In the 1980s, the UK experienced a surge in heroin supply because of a sudden cheap influx from Pakistan (the main supplier had been – and is now – Afghanistan). Cues from popular culture – and a social downtown caused by the economic and industrial crisis in the late 1970s – created the perfect environment for the Trainspotting generation.
    • In the 1990s, heroin use was again popularized by the rise of grunge and Britpop, while the emergence of ‘the waif’ in fashion, of which Kate Moss is often cited as the originator, would give rise to the term ‘heroin chic’.

    Kate Moss and Johnny Depp, together in 1994

    • In 1994, the Swiss began to trial a diamorphine maintenance program for users who had failed multiple withdrawal programs. It aimed to maintain the health of the user, by discouraging the use of illicit street Heroin. It was deemed a success.
    • Today, the largest producer of opium, needed to create heroin is Afghanistan. This is closely followed by Mexico, who, it is it estimated, increased their rate of production sixfold between2007 and 2011. Diacetylmorphine is a controlled, Class A substance in the UK, but continues to be used in palliative care for the treatment of acute pain, such as in severe physical trauma, post-surgical and chronic pain, as well as relieving sufferers of terminal illnesses.

    Russell Brand pictured with Mitch Winehouse at a memorial for his daughter, Amy Winehouse, last year.

    • Key figures continue to campaign for greater sympathies and better treatment of heroin addicts as they attempt to rehabilitate themselves and re-enter society. Russell Brand’s Give it Up Fund, run in conjunction with Comic Relief, aims to provide financial aid to help people remain free from substance abuse by setting up support groups. "It's integral that people entering a life of abstinence after the chaos of addiction have stability, support and a role to play in the wider community," he said.

      Peaches Geldof, drug addiction and a very brief history of heroin - People - News - The Independent




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  10. #430
    Elite Member gas_chick's Avatar
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    Those pics just made me sad. At the end of the day she was just such a young girl with so much ahead of her and addiction killed it all in the end.
    I am going to come and burn the fucking house down... but you will blow me first."

  11. #431
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    ^^ I totes agree. She loved those babies but the addiction got her in the end.

  12. #432
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    Super interesting read about heroin. Thanks for possting that.
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  13. #433
    Elite Member rollo's Avatar
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    'I was trying to help her!' Courtney Love reveals her attempt to save Peaches Geldof after seeing her with 'a bag of 500 pills'

    By DAILY MAIL REPORTER
    PUBLISHED: 00:37, 21 May 2014 | UPDATED: 09:51, 21 May 2014

    Courtney Love has recalled how she pushed Peaches Geldof out of the door after seeing the late socialite with a bag full of '500 pills'.

    The Hole rocker - who has battled drug addiction several times - told Grazia she was horrified when Peaches, whose death last month has been linked to heroin use, visited her in Los Angeles at the Chateau Marmont, bringing with her a friend who was carrying a number of prescription drugs.

    While Courtney admitted to 'pushing' Peaches - whose mother Paula Yates died of a heroin overdose in 2000 - out of the room because she was so tempted by the drugs, their encounter made her vow to want to try and help her however she could.




    +4


    Scary moment: Courtney love, pictured last week, has recalled a time she saw Peaches Geldof with a bag full of prescription drugs

    Before her death, Courtney believed Peaches had turned her life around, but she recalled the incident that made her want to 'help' in 2010.
    She said: 'My drug was heroin, I stopped taking it in the 90s, but I have taken the pills, the Roxycontin, Oxycontin.'
    'Peaches was in a room with a friend who had a bag full of these drugs, like 500 pills and I wanted it so badly, never have I ever wanted anything more - no man, no money - and I had to physically push Peaches and her friend out of the door.

    'I was shaking and I kept thinking of the way her mother died and I thought I owe it to this girl to be an example.
    'I was trying to help her, but at that point in her life, it proved to be impossible. Now the parallels to her mommy are horrific. It terrifies me for my own child.'
    Courtney has daughter Frances Bean with late husband Kurt Cobain, and is grateful that the 21-year-old is 'sensible'.

    But she revealed that thinking about her encounter with the late Peaches makes her shudder, and told the magazine: 'What happened with me and Peaches that day, when the junkie in me came out and I had to fight for the good side, brings me out in a cold sweat.'

    Courtney added: 'You just can't believe it happened, it's so f***ing tragic. This girl was vivacious, so full of life and it was weird and horrible that she has passed away.

    'I read heroin was involved and I was not shocked. I know how Peaches liked opiates.'



    +4


    'It terrifies me': The 49-year-old admits what happened to Peaches makes her fear for her daughter, who she is seen with in 2009, but Courtney added that Frances Bean is 'sensible'



    Read more: Courtney Love recalls seeing Peaches Geldof with 'a bag of 500 pills' | Mail Online


  14. #434
    Elite Member witchcurlgirl's Avatar
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    Oh Courtney, you'll stop at nothing to get some press, including stepping on the dead



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  15. #435
    Elite Member gas_chick's Avatar
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    If this was her help, no wonder she didn't make it.
    I am going to come and burn the fucking house down... but you will blow me first."

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