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Thread: An Open Letter From Dylan Farrow

  1. #541
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    Quote Originally Posted by dallison View Post
    I absolutely believe her and have intentionally never watched a Woody Allen film.
    Same here.

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    Elite Member CornFlakegrl's Avatar
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    The liberals have gone mad. Sorry/not sorry. Liberalism has turned itself inside out to the point where it's hard to distinguish a progressive from a fascist. This feeling isn't just coming from this thread but a lot of other topics in the news as well.

    I believe Ronan. I also know that Woody Allen was not convicted of a crime. I believe in the rule of law. He was innocent until proven guilty, legally anyway, and as such, this idea that he should burned at that stake disturbs me. That is not how justice works in a civilized place. So he is free to work and live.

    If someone objects to working with him because of the allegations, great. Don't work with him. Don't watch his movies either. That is your choice. And one I would make (he's a fucking weirdo) but if someone makes a different choice that's theirs to make. We should not be calling for their heads. To sput's point, because they are not responsible for what he may or may not have done but also, because persecuting other people for his alleged crime is not justice either.

    It's all so fucked up. And i'm with sput on celebs saying, no I won't apologize. In fact, I enjoy it so much lately, when it rarely happens, that even people I don't like are getting cyber high fives from me. This digital mob mentality infuriates me.
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    One might argue that neither Bill Cosby nor Harvey Weinstein have been convicted in a court of law, yet we are calling for their heads and they will never work in their field again. Are they innocent until proven guilty? Why is the molested child of a celebrity less believable or whose story is of less merit than a wanna be actress? Go back and read the VF article on Woody v the family. There was all kinds of creepy shit going on. When the tiny Dylan would come to Woody's apartment, she had to immediately take off her clothes and have a cuddle naked in the bed with Woody in his tidy white undies. That's not normal.
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    Silver Member Timetoout's Avatar
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    Alec Baldwin apologists will continue to flock around him even though he has a long history of a violent temper where he loses his cool and then laughs it off later as no big deal. His groupies find that kind of guy a sexy rebel, meanwhile they hypocritically call themselves feminists. It's only wrong when people we don't think are hot or genius do it. It's gross but that's what Hollywood is like.

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    I do think people should say they're sorry to have worked with him, even if they're not really because the movie was a huge boost to their careers. Yes it's fucking hypocritical but it's important anyway to take that stand, and to say that in the future you won't be working with scumbags like that again.

    Because that's the thing, despite every horrible thing those men did, they were still able to continue because people still worked with them, there was no consequence at all for their actions, so of course they felt all powerful and continued abusing their power.
    (thats why I love Gal Gadot for saying she won't film WW2 as long as Bret Rattner is attached to the project)
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  6. #546
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    Woody Allen Responds to Dylan Farrow Interview as She Claims 'He's Been Lying for So Long'

    Woody Allen is responding to Dylan Farrow‘s first television interview, denying claims he molested his adopted daughter when she was 7 years old.

    In her interview about the allegations with CBS This Morning‘s Gayle King, Farrow recounted what she claims happened while her adoptive mother Mia Farrow was out shopping for the day.

    “I was taken to a small attic crawl space in my mother’s country house in Connecticut by my father. He instructed me to lay down on my stomach and play with my brother’s toy train that was set up,” Dylan said on Thursday’s show. “And he sat behind me in the doorway, and as I played with the toy train, I was sexually assaulted… As a 7-year-old I would say, I would have said he touched my private parts.”

    She added, “As a 32-year-old, he touched my labia and my vulva with his finger.”

    Dylan said she told her mother about what allegedly happened, noting that she felt she had “done something wrong” by the actress’ upset reaction.

    Although she was taken to a doctor, Dylan said the abuse didn’t end there. She claimed Allen would touch her, cuddle her and even ask her to get in bed with him when they were wearing just underwear.

    King then played a video of Allen’s interview with 60 Minutes where the director denied the allegations and suggested his ex Mia coached Dylan in an effort to harm him during their “very bitter acrimonious custody fight.”

    “He’s lying and he’s been lying for so long,” Dylan said after watching the video in tears. “And it is difficult for me to see him and to hear his voice. I’m sorry.”

    In 2014, Farrow – who is one of the star’s three children with ex Mia Farrow — publicly claimed that Allen molested her as a child. Allen has long denied the allegations, which first surfaced during his explosive 1992 split from Mia. The director was not charged, though a Connecticut prosecutor said there was probable cause for a criminal case.

    His son Ronan Farrow also penned an explosive column for the Hollywood Reporter, which addressed the sexual abuse claims and condemned the media for not asking Allen about the allegations and stars for working with him. In response, Allen told The Guardian, “I have no interest in all of that. I find that all tabloid stupidity.”

    Mia was awarded full custody of adopted children Dylan, Moses and biological son Satchel (who later changed his name to Ronan). A judge also barred Allen from any visitation with Dylan in the custody case, which had exploded after Allen’s affair with Farrow’s adopted daughter Soon-Yi Previn, then about 20, was revealed. Allen and Previn have now been married for more than 20 years.

    Following Dylan’s TV interview, Allen again denied the alleged sexual abuse.

    “When this claim was first made more than 25 years ago, it was thoroughly investigated by both the Child Sexual Abuse Clinic of the Yale-New Haven Hospital and New York State Child Welfare. They both did so for many months and independently concluded that no molestation had ever taken place,” the director said in a statement. “Instead, they found it likely a vulnerable child had been coached to tell the story by her angry mother during a contentious breakup.”

    “Dylan’s older brother Moses has said that he witnessed their mother doing exactly that – relentlessly coaching Dylan, trying to drum into her that her father was a dangerous sexual predator. It seems to have worked – and, sadly, I’m sure Dylan truly believes what she says,” he continued. “But even though the Farrow family is cynically using the opportunity afforded by the Time’s Up movement to repeat this discredited allegation, that doesn’t make it any more true today than it was in the past. I never molested my daughter – as all investigations concluded a quarter of a century ago.”

    The controversy surrounding the director is making headlines again after the Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment accusations rocked Hollywood. A slew of celebrities have since come out and expressed regret for working with the Annie Hall director.

    On Monday, actor Timothée Chalamet pledged to donate his entire salary for his upcoming film directed by Allen, A Rainy Day in New York, to the Time’s Up movement.

    The Call Me By Your Name actor, 22, stars in the comedy alongside Jude Law, Elle Fanning and Selena Gomez.

    In recent weeks, Greta Gerwig, Rebecca Hall and Mira Sorvino have also denounced the director.

    Dylan said she was not angry with actors who have chosen to work with her father but wants them to “acknowledge their complicity.”

    She said, “I hope that, you know, especially since so many of them have been vocal advocates of this Me Too and Time’s Up movement that, um, they can acknowledge their complicity and maybe hold themselves accountable to how they have perpetuated this culture of – of silence in their industry.”

    Woody Allen Denies Molestation of Dylan Farrow | PEOPLE.com
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    Elite Member dallison's Avatar
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    Reading his statement, I was wondering where he would get to the point where he said he didn't do it instead of just saying, "people looked into it and I wasn't charged." That's a big difference to me. I thought he wasn't going to deny it it at all, simply say he wasn't found 'guilty'.

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    Is no-one watching Farrow V Allen on HBO?

    I have not seen it yet (not sure if I want to) but I have heard Real Crime Profile’s take on it (ex-FBI behavioural analyst & ex-Met Police (London) activist Laura Richards).
    That lead me to seeking out the show’s podcast and ultimately a Vanity Fair article (below):-




    The new HBO docuseries Allen v. Farrow—about Dylan Farrow’s accusations of sexual assault against her father, the critically acclaimed and much-feted writer-director Woody Allen—has a lot to tell us. It is not, as one might have guessed, a rehashing of media stories we’ve already heard. Instead, the four-part series—which begins airing Sunday—asks us to face much of what’s already out there: years of diligently collected testimony and evidence about what occurred on August 4, 1992, the day the alleged abuses took place.
    Directors Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering (On the Record and The Invisible War) dig into court records, including witness testimony and social worker interviews. They conduct present-day interviews with many of the case’s central figures, including Dylan, now 35 years old, her mother, Mia Farrow, and her siblings Ronan Farrow, Fletcher Previn, Daisy Previn, Frankie-Minh Farrow,and Quincy Farrow. (Dick and Ziering don’t speak with her brother Moses Farrow, a frequent defender of Allen; Dylan’s sister Soon-Yi Previn, who married Allen in 1997; or Allen himself, who has categorically denied Dylan’s allegations. All three declined to be interviewed for the series, Dick and Ziering recently told The New York Times.)
    They also speak to former Connecticut state prosecutor Frank Maco, who found probable cause for bringing a criminal case against Allen but ultimately declined to do so, due to concerns about re-traumatizing a fragile, then eight-year-old Dylan. The directors and their producers look at a much-cited contemporaneous Yale-New Haven Hospital report, which claimed that Mia may have coached Dylan and that Dylan had trouble separating fantasy and reality; they find that the notes social workers took when interviewing Dylan were all destroyed before the report’s conclusions were publicized by the hospital, which goes against protocol in a criminal investigation. One of the case workers from Yale-New Haven, Jennifer Sawyer, later told a New York City caseworker, Paul Williams, that Dylan’s version of events had been consistent and credible.




    Allen v. Farrow also shows us videos shot by Mia shortly after the alleged assault, in which she asks Dylan to repeat the story she’s apparently already told her mother. Seven-year-old Dylan then alleges that her father, Allen, took her into the attic in their Connecticut house and “touched my privates,” promising that if she let him do this, he would take her to Paris and put her in his movies. Dick and Ziering ask several independent child abuse experts and lawyers to examine the video; those experts point out behaviors and interactions from the videos that indicate that, in their opinions, Dylan does not appear to be coached. Allen v. Farrow also details crucial testimony, largely unheard by the public, about Mia’s adopted daughter Soon-Yi Previn, with whom Allen allegedly began a sexual relationship when Soon-Yi was still in high school, according to testimony from a doorman, building manager, and maid at Allen’s residence. (How young she was, exactly, is disputed. Soon-Yi and Allen maintain that their relationship became sexual only when Soon-Yi was a consenting adult.)



    I recount all of these details to emphasize how thorough
    Allen v. Farrow appears to be, an investigation that took place over about two years and involves many court-filed documents, tape recordings, video, and additional research based on multiple peer-reviewed studies and expert testimony. Allen v. Farrow also allows the accused to defend himself; in lieu of an interview with Allen, it features clips from Allen’s audiobook version of his 2020 memoir, in which he fervently denies the accusations.


    Even as a critic, it feels impossible to consider this series as a piece of art. It’s journalism, because it goes to great lengths to place much-obscured facts at the forefront of a story that has long been told through the lens of P.R. spin. Since the ’90s, members of the press have frequently portrayed Mia as a scorned woman, lashing out at Allen simply because he was unfaithful to her. Allen’s career hardly seemed to suffer after the allegations. He has continued making one movie nearly every single year up to the present day, winning and being nominated for Oscars (most recently in 2014), and working with Hollywood’s biggest stars—at least, up until the #MeToo movement gathered speed in 2017 and 2018, when big names began publicly announcing that they regrettedstaring in his films and Amazon cut ties with him. Mia, meanwhile, had been so tied to Allen both romantically and professionally that the accusations against him tore her own life apart. Mia says in the docuseries that after reporting Dylan’s accusation to a doctor who then had to report it to the police, Allen told her Mia would never work in Hollywood again. After their split, she says, she was only able to get work in Ireland and France.


    Dylan has said this herself before, but it bears repeating: Both Hollywood and its attendant media have long abused their power in service of the talented men considered their most lucrative assets. The docuseries does spotlight the journalists, most of them women, who chased the truth rather than buying into the spin, including Vanity Fair reporter Maureen Orth. (Orth wrote an article explaining Mia’s case against Allen in 1992; in the wake of a 2014 open letter from Dylan, Orth fact-checked the media response.)

    Allen has accused Mia of coaching Dylan, concocting a story designed to damage him after she discovered his affair with Soon-Yi. His status as a beloved and prolific director—and the financial resources that sprung forth from that success—made his voice much louder and more believable to the public, until very recently, than Dylan’s or even Mia’s. Two of Mia’s children still echo Allen’s version of events: Soon-Yi and Moses, whom Allen adopted when he was a boy, have denied Dylan’s accusations and themselves accused Mia of abuse. Their counter-accusations came long after Dylan first spoke out in 1992; in the docuseries, Ronan and Dylan deny that any such abuse on Mia’s part occurred. The docuseries points out that Moses’s more recent rebuttals and accusations also appear inconsistent with the testimony Allen gave in family court decades ago.
    The series does its best not to place judgment on Moses or Soon-Yi, who were both very young during the events that tore their large family apart. It does, however, imply that those two may have been the most vulnerable to being wooed by Allen’s outsize power. According to Mia, neither Moses nor Soon-Yi had consistent father figures as children—Soon-Yi was adopted not long before Mia’s separation from conductor André Previn, never bonding with him, and Moses was adopted before Mia’s relationship with Allen. Soon-Yi was also adopted at approximately age seven, and, according to Mia, took a while to bond to her. Moses was eventually adopted by Allen after the latter became more ingrained in the family. In a contemporaneous letter obtained by the directors, he expresses hurt and betrayal at Allen’s misdeeds, both in having an affair with Soon-Yi and allegedly assaulting Dylan. Ronan, who did not hear Dylan tell her story until they were both adults, claims in the docuseries that his father told him he would pay Ronan’s college fees if Ronan spoke out against his mother. (Allen has not yet responded to a request for comment about this claim.)



    Much of this series are wrenching and infuriating to watch—but the moment that stays with me is an interview with Sheryl Harden, a senior supervisor for the New York City Child Welfare Administration from 1982 to 1993. Harden, a Black woman, selected Paul Williams, a Black man, as the caseworker for the investigation regarding Dylan’s accusations. He was a star employee who had been awarded by the city of New York for his dedication and professionalism. Williams was fired, temporarily, after writing a report outlining the credibility of Dylan’s accusations. This, coupled with how easy it was for Allen to apparently exert influence over the Child Welfare Administration, soured Harden from her work. (Allen has not yet responded to a request for comment about whether he exerted influence over the agency.) She quit shortly after the case was closed, and argues in the docuseries that low-income and Black families would have never been afforded the accommodations Allen was. Her implication is that the system she worked for was structurally unjust—not only in service of a man like Woody Allen, but against people whom society had deemed less valuable than him.
    This message goes far and wide. When I applied to college in 2010, four years before Dylan’s open letter would appear in The New York Times and 18 years after the original accusations against Allen, I wrote an essay about my love of movies. I was applying to Yale, and I wrote about the film Manhattan. I was 16 years old—just a year younger than Allen’s girlfriend in the film, Tracy, played by Mariel Hemingway, who herself was 16 at the time of filming. Allen was 42. (In a 2020 interview with the Daily Beast, Hemingway said that Allen propositioned her when she was 17, asking her to “go to Paris” with him—a line that echoes what Dylan says Allen told her when he allegedly assaulted her.) I believed in the love story Allen told in that film, not as a critic or an experienced adult, but as a teen who wanted to go to a fancy college.



    In the end, I got into the school that is affiliated with the hospital that wrote the uncredible report that sought to exonerate Woody Allen. Upon accepting my offer of admission, I received a letter from one of the admissions officers praising my essay. It’s not lost on me that this affirmation gave me the confidence to pursue writing, and that going to that school is a huge part of the reason you’re reading my work now.
    In 2014, Diane Keaton accepted Allen’s lifetime-achievement award at the Golden Globes on his behalf. After the ceremony, she told Matt Lauer that she didn’t hesitate to celebrate Allen, because she wouldn’t “be here” without him. Watching that clip, I was reminded again of how prestigious careers can be chained to so many things that the successful might refuse to see. That is, unless we simply turn around and look.

    https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood...bo-documentary
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    Elite Member Beeyotch's Avatar
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    Watching that clip, I was reminded again of how prestigious careers can be chained to so many things that the successful might refuse to see. That is, unless we simply turn around and look.
    I think that should be put in huge bold font on billboards all over NYC and L.A. It's a hard truth, but still true.

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    I just feel so sorry for Dylan and Soon-Yi. For Mia, too, but she was an adult when this happened, even if she went through hell both privately and professional.
    Woody destroyed her whole family and he is still like teflon, nothing sticks to him.

    I'm torn about Diane Keaton. I understand her reasoning, but still, it is hard to accept it. And I wouldn't, but she happens to be one of my favorite actors. Too bad .

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    watched Farrow v. Allen. Never liked Allen. It just solidifies it more. Dylan was totally believable.
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    Somebody recently did an analysis of Allen's films where some young woman around 18-22 has a crush on a dude who is like 40-50. The first one was "Manhattan", I think. And I think the other one might have had Scarlett Johansson (not "Lost in Translation"), and one or two more. It kind of showed what he was thinking in terms of basically no reasonable limits on age differences between two people. Also, I think he was an admirer of Charlie Chaplin - and for all the wrong reasons....

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    WA has obviously been pursuing teenagers/young women for a long time and several have come forward. To engage in pedophilia is quite a departure from his apparent usual preference, so I wonder if there are other little girls he has molested or if this was a one-off.
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    Woody Allen had such an inappropriate relationship with Dylan that he was in therapy for it. That it bordered on obsession is undeniable. Couple that with Dylan's memories & eyewitness reports of his head in her naked lap, & it's clear that he molested her. Add in the Real Crime Profile crew's analysis of their testimonies, & I am completely convinced.

    Another interesting thing is eyewitness testimonies of Woody Allen's doorman & maid that Soon-Yi was still in high school when they started having sex. The odd thing, though, is that the affair to me seemed to come from out of nowhere, which I think is why it was such a surprise to Mia Farrow. She was so focused on Woody's relationship with Dylan that it never occurred to her to suspect his relationship with Soon-Yi. Part of me wonders if he started the affair to punish Mia for trying to reduce his access to Dylan.
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    DCS said that Dylan was credible & that they thought WA did it. They didn’t prosecute so as not to put a vulnerable child through a process. I guess they thought that they were doing what they thought best at the time but I think that it proves that it was probably the wrong call.



    There is recorded audio of Mia Farrow having a conversation with scumbag WA & she says that Dylan is sleeping in her bed & holding her vagina & asking why her daddy would hurt her. Mia also says “it is NOT ok to have sex with my children” so I strongly think that WA was in therapy for that not just being obsessed/having a fixation on Dylan.

    A few teen girls have come out and disclosed about their relationships with him; so I don’t know - it would be “strange” for an offender not to have other victims that he has silenced with his power but maybe he didn’t. At this point I just don’t know.
    Kathie_Moffett and Lalasnake like this.
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