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Thread: News of the World to close amid hacking scandal

  1. #16
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    This is the tip of the iceberg, just wait until the details of what the Mirror and the Daily Mail have been up to emerge. There'll barely be a newspaper left standing when this is through.

  2. #17
    Elite Member Chilly Willy's Avatar
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    Andy Coulson just got arrested.


    Andy Coulson arrested over phone-hacking allegations

    David Cameron's former spokesman and former News of the World editor held for questioning over corruption and phone-hacking allegations
    Andy Coulson has been arrested over phone-hacking allegations. Photograph: Danny Lawson/PA

    • Andy Coulson, the prime minister's former press spokesman, has been arrested and is being held in custody at a police station in south London.
      Scotland Yard said that at 10.30am officers from Operation Weeting – the phone-hacking inquiry – and a team from the inquiry into illegal payments to police officers within the Metropolitan force arrested a 43-year-old man who had arrived by appointment.
      The Yard said he was being held in custody and would be questioned in connection with allegations of corruption and phone hacking. The arrests came after Operation Weeting officers were handed further information from News International three weeks ago which detailed allegedly illegal payments to a handful of officers at Scotland Yard.
      It is understood Coulson, a former editor of the News of the World, will be held for several hours for questioning. Officers will take him through documentation, much of it handed over by his former employer News International.
      He will be questioned on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications, contrary to Section 1 (1) Criminal Law Act 1977 and "on suspicion of corruption allegations" contrary to Section 1 of the Prevention of Corruption Act 1906.
      Coulson, who resigned as David Cameron's director of communications, had been contacted on Thursday by detectives from Operation Weeting and asked to present himself at a police station. The arrest was brought forward after the new documentation received from News International.
      Coulson is the sixth person to be arrested by the team from Operation Weeting. His three former colleagues Ian Edmondson, Neville Thurlbeck and James Weatherup were arrested earlier this year. Last month a freelancer for the News of the World and a reporter from the Press Association were also arrested and bailed.
      The arrest came less than 24 hours after the decision by News International chiefs to shut the News of the World because it had betrayed its readers' trust.
      A Scotland Yard statement said: "The MPS [Metropolitan police service] has this morning arrested a member of the public in connection with allegations of corruption and phone hacking.
      "The man, aged 43, was arrested by appointment at a south London police station. He is currently in custody.
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011...ng-allegations
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  3. #18
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    I heard on the news this morning that arrests were expected.

  4. #19
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    david cameron hired the former editor of a crummy tabloid as his director of communications? klassy.
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  5. #20
    Elite Member Dean James's Avatar
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    What a mess. I can only hope this creates a tsunami of lawsuits that cracks a dent in Murdoch's empire.
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  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Abaris View Post
    This is the tip of the iceberg, just wait until the details of what the Mirror and the Daily Mail have been up to emerge. There'll barely be a newspaper left standing when this is through.
    Piers Morgan should be quaking in his boots, not mouthing off on Hugh Grant on twitter.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novice View Post
    I heard on the news this morning that arrests were expected.
    Andy Coulson and Clive Goodman.

  8. #23
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    Yeah, like I'm going to click on a link....

  9. #24
    Elite Member ana-mish-ana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean James View Post
    What a mess. I can only hope this creates a tsunami of lawsuits that cracks a dent in Murdoch's empire.
    Actually Reuters have reported that according to UK law a paper that has been demised - records can be destroyed but looking at twitter there is a few ex NOTW reporters are going to get info.

  10. #25
    Elite Member Sarzy's Avatar
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    @ Novice - They're just links to The Guardian paper.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by ana-mish-ana View Post
    Actually Reuters have reported that according to UK law a paper that has been demised - records can be destroyed but looking at twitter there is a few ex NOTW reporters are going to get info.
    I think that seeing as its already subject to an ongoing investigation that they were be very big consequences if they did destroy documents now.

    Breaking News

    6:58pm UK, Friday July 08, 2011

    Rebekah Brooks: 'More Revelations To Come'



    Rebekah Brooks has told News Of The World staff she was aware of more revelations to come and they would understand in a year why the paper is soon closing, Sky sources say.


    Sky News has obtained a recording of part of the meeting, where there were indications of discontent among workers over the shutting down of the paper after Sunday.
    Staff who were told without warning 24 hours earlier that the best-selling tabloid is to cease production were summoned to floor 13 of the News International offices.
    Workers are angry at News International chief executive Mrs Brooks after it became clear she would keep her job while they were losing theirs.
    Most of the paper's present editorial staff were not employed there during the time the phone hacking that led to its demise allegedly took place - but Mrs Brooks was, serving as editor before moving on to run The Sun.
    Addressing them for the second time in two days, said said she will try and find them other jobs at News International and News Corp - despite growing pressure on her to quit, sources say.
    Mrs Brooks also said she has "visibility" on revelations to come and in a year they will understand why the company made this decision, sources added.
    The News International boss said the move to close the Sunday tabloid was because there was another two years plus ahead of trouble, sources said.


    Mrs Brooks said she was staying on because she is a "conductor" for it all, it is believed. She claimed advertisers said the brand was toxic and the decision to close was not done lightly and was with great sadness, sources said.
    They added that Mrs Brooks went on to say the staff may be angry with her, but she was angry at the people who took part in phone hacking and she felt bitterly betrayed.
    In a letter to all staff, she confirmed she is not in charge of the company's investigation into alleged phone hacking.
    She said that no decisions have yet been made about new publications or expanding existing ones, but that Fabulous magazine will be retained.
    Mrs Brooks has faced harsh criticism from MPs and other sections of the media, and in the wake of the announcement about the NOTW the Prime Minister also suggested it could be time for her to step down.
    Mrs Brooks remains a powerful figure in the national media as well as a personal friend - but the pressure piling on her has evidently changed the PM's thinking.






    There have been reports that Mrs Brooks offered her resignation but it was not accepted. Mr Cameron said he would have let her quit.
    Mrs Brooks has always denied any knowledge of the dark practices which have led to the closure of Britain's best-selling newspaper - despite the fact they were allegedly taking place during her time as editor.
    "I have to tell you that I am sickened that these events are alleged to have happened," she wrote in a memo to staff earlier.
    "I hope that you all realise it is inconceivable that I knew or worse, sanctioned these appalling allegations (sic)."
    Mrs Brooks has been repeatedly backed by both Rupert and James Murdoch, even as James admitted the NOTW had been "sullied" by "behaviour that was wrong", and, if, proven to be true, "inhuman".


    Read James Murdoch's full statement on the closure of the NOTW

    But he then claimed it was Mrs Brooks' leadership that has really "gotten to grips with this whole period in the company's history".
    Her continued presence at the helm of News International makes a stark contrast with the fortunes of another former NOTW editor, Andy Coulson.
    Mr Coulson not only resigned from the newspaper but also from his subsequent job as Mr Cameron's head of communications, and has now been arrested as part of investigations into hacking and corruption.
    Along with James Murdoch, Mrs Brooks was the one who delivered the news the NOTW was to close to its stunned staff - prompting what one described as a "lynch mob mentality" against her.
    That feeling has been reflected more widely on Twitter, where the hashtag #sackbrooks is being used, and among MPs such as Labour's Chris Bryant, who is taking legal action over claims his phone was hacked.
    He said the NOTW's closure "is designed to try to protect Rebekah Brooks", adding: "This strategy of chucking first journalists, then executives, and now a whole newspaper overboard isn't going to protect the person at the helm."



    There's more???

  12. #27
    Elite Member Dean James's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ana-mish-ana View Post
    Actually Reuters have reported that according to UK law a paper that has been demised - records can be destroyed but looking at twitter there is a few ex NOTW reporters are going to get info.
    Wonder if that's why they closed it down then. If so, that's pretty crappy.
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  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by scarlett View Post
    if any of you outwith UK guys can get a copy of bbc's question time i'd recommend watching it, hugh grant is kicking ass lol on the panel
    [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkTs1Ayq8qo&feature=related[/youtube]
    [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTy5ihm2I5U[/youtube]

    The bugger, bugged

    Hugh Grant
    Published 12 April 2011

    After a chance meeting with a former News of the World executive who told him his phone had been hacked, Hugh Grant couldn’t resist going back to him – with a hidden tape recorder – to find out if there was more to the story . . .


    When I broke down in my midlife crisis car in remotest Kent just before Christmas, a battered white van pulled up on the far carriageway. To help, I thought. But when the driver got out he started taking pictures with a long-lens camera. He came closer to get better shots and I swore at him. Then he offered me a lift the last few miles to my destination. I suspected his motives and swore at him some more. (I'm not entirely sympathetic towards paparazzi.) Then I realised I couldn't get a taxi and was late. So I had to accept the lift.
    He turned out to be an ex-News of the World investigative journalist and paparazzo, now running a pub in Dover. He still kept his camera in the car's glove box for just this kind of happy accident.
    More than that, he was Paul McMullan, one of two ex-NoW hacks who had blown the whistle (in the Guardian and on Channel 4's Dispatches) on the full extent of phone-hacking at the paper, particularly under its former editor Andy Coulson. This was interesting, as I had been a victim - a fact he confirmed as we drove along. He also had an unusual defence of the practice: that phone-hacking was a price you had to pay for living in a free society. I asked how that worked exactly, but we ran out of time, and next thing we had arrived and he was asking me if I would pose for a photo with him, "not for publication, just for the wall of the pub".
    I agreed and the picture duly appeared in the Mail on Sunday that weekend with his creative version of the encounter. He had asked me to drop into his pub some time. So when, some months later, Jemima asked me to write a piece for this paper, it occurred to me it might be interesting to take him up on his invitation.
    I wanted to hear more about phone-hacking and the whole business of tabloid journalism. It occurred to me just to interview him straight, as he has, after all, been a whistleblower. But then I thought I might possibly get more, and it might be more fun, if I secretly taped him, The bugger bugged, as it were. Here are some excerpts from our conversation.
    Me So, how's the whistleblowing going?
    Him I'm trying to get a book published. I sent it off to a publisher who immediately accepted it and then it got legal and they said, "This is never going to get published."
    Me Why? Because it accuses too many people of crime?
    Him Yes, as I said to the parliamentary commission, Coulson knew all about it and regularly ordered it . . . He [Coulson] rose quickly to the top; he wanted to cover his tracks all the time. So he wouldn't just write a story about a celeb who'd done something. He'd want to make sure they could never sue, so he wanted us to hear the celeb like you on tape saying, "Hello, darling, we had lovely sex last night." So that's on tape - OK, we've got that and so we can publish . . . Historically, the way it went was, in the early days of mobiles, we all had analogue mobiles and that was an absolute joy. You know, you just . . . sat outside Buckingham Palace with a 59 scanner you bought at Argos and get Prince Charles and everything he said.
    Me Is that how the Squidgy tapes [of Diana's phone conversations] came out? Which was put down to radio hams, but was in fact . . .
    Him Paps in the back of a van, yes . . . I mean, politicians were dropping like flies in the Nineties because it was so easy to get stuff on them. And, obviously, less easy to justify is celebrities. But yes.
    Me And . . . it wasn't just the News of the World. It was , you know - the Mail?
    Him Oh absolutely, yeah. When I went freelance in 2004 the biggest payers - you'd have thought it would be the NoW, but actually it was the Daily Mail. If I take a good picture, the first person I go to is - such as in your case - the Mail on Sunday. Did you see that story? The picture of you, breaking down . . . I ought to thank you for that. I got 3,000. Whooo!
    Me But would they [the Mail] buy a phone-hacked story?
    Him For about four or five years they've absolutely been cleaner than clean. And before that they weren't. They were as dirty as anyone . . . They had the most money.
    Me So everyone knew? I mean, would Rebekah Wade have known all this stuff was going on?
    Him Good question. You're not taping, are you?
    Me [slightly shrill voice] No.
    Him Well, yeah. Clearly she . . . took over the job of [a journalist] who had a scanner who was trying to sell it to members of his own department. But it wasn't a big crime. [NB: Rebekah Brooks has always denied any knowledge of phone-hacking. The current police investigation is into events that took place after her editorship of the News of the World.]
    It started off as fun - you know, it wasn't against the law, so why wouldn't you? And it was only because the MPs who were fiddling their expenses and being generally corrupt kept getting caught so much they changed the law in 2001 to make it illegal to buy and sell a digital scanner. So all we were left with was - you know - finding a blag to get your mobile [records] out of someone at Vodafone. Or, when someone's got it, other people swap things for it.
    Me So they all knew? Wade probably knew all about it all?
    Him [...] Cameron must have known - that's the bigger scandal. He had to jump into bed with Murdoch as everyone had, starting with Thatcher in the Seventies . . . Tony Blair . . . [tape is hard to hear here] Maggie openly courted Murdoch, saying, you know, "Please support me." So when Cameron, when it came his turn to go to Murdoch via Rebekah Wade . . . Cameron went horse riding regularly with Rebekah. I know, because as well as doorstepping celebrities, I've also doorstepped my ex-boss by hiding in the bushes, waiting for her to come past with Cameron on a horse . . . before the election to show that - you know - Murdoch was backing Cameron.
    Me What happened to that story?
    Him The Guardian paid for me to do it and I stepped in it and missed them, basically. They'd gone past - not as good as having a picture.
    Me Do you think Murdoch knew about phone-hacking?
    Him Errr, possibly not. He's a funny bloke given that he owns the Sun and the Screws . . . quite puritanical. Sorry to talk about Divine Brown, but when that came out . . . Murdoch was furious: "What are you putting that on our front page for? You're bringing down the tone of our papers." [Indicating himself] That's what we do over here.
    Me Well, it's also because it was his film I was about to come out in.
    Him Oh. I see.
    Me Yeah. It was a Fox film.
    [A pause here while we chat to other customers, and then - ]
    Him So anyway, let me finish my story.
    Me Murdoch, yes . . .
    Him So I was sent to do a feature on Moulin Rouge! at Cannes, which was a great send anyway. Basically my brief was to see who Nicole Kidman was shagging - what she was doing, poking through her bins and get some stuff on her. So Murdoch's paying her five million quid to big up the French and at the same time paying me 5.50 to fuck her up . . . So all hail the master. We're just pawns in his game. How perverse is that?
    Me Wow. You reckon he never knew about it?
    Him [pause] I don't even think he really worried himself too much about it.
    Me What's his son called?
    Him James. They're all mates together. They all go horse riding. You've got Jeremy Clarkson lives here [in Oxfordshire]. Cameron lives here, and Rebekah Wade is married to Brooks's son [the former racehorse trainer Charlie Brooks]. Cameron gets dressed up as the Stig to go to Clarkson's 50th birthday party [NB: it was actually to record a video message for the party]. Is that demeaning for a prime minister? It should be the other way round, shouldn't it? So basically, Cameron is very much in debt to Rebekah Wade for helping him not quite win the election . . . So that was my submission to parliament - that Cameron's either a liar or an idiot.
    Me But don't you think that all these prime ministers deliberately try to get the police to drag their feet about investigating the whole [phone-hacking] thing because they don't want to upset Murdoch?
    Him Yeah. There's that . . . You also work a lot with policemen as well . . . One of the early stories was [and here he names a much-loved TV actress in her sixties] used to be a street walker - whether or not she was, but that's the tip.
    Me and Chum MLTVA?!
    Me I can't believe it. Oh no!
    Chum Really??
    Him Yeah. Well, not now . . .
    Chum Oh, it'd be so much better if it was now.
    Him So I asked a copper to get his hands on the phone files, but because it's only a caution it's not there any more. So that's the tip . . . it's a policeman ringing up a tabloid reporter and asking him for ten grand because this girl had been cautioned right at the start of his career. And then I ask another policemen to go and check the records . . . So that's happening regularly. So the police don't particularly want to investigate.
    Me But do you think they're going to have to now?
    Him I mean - 20 per cent of the Met has taken backhanders from tabloid hacks. So why would they want to open up that can of worms? . . . And what's wrong with that, anyway? It doesn't hurt anyone particularly. I mean, it could hurt someone's career - but isn't that the dance with the devil you have to play?
    Me Well, I suppose the fact that they're dragging their feet while investigating a mass of phone-hacking - which is a crime - some people would think is a bit depressing about the police.
    Him But then - should it be a crime? I mean, scanning never used to be a crime. Why should it be? You're transmitting your thoughts and your voice over the airwaves. How can you not expect someone to just stick up an aerial and listen in?
    Me So if someone was on a landline and you had a way of tapping in . . .
    Him Much harder to do.
    Me But if you could, would you think that was illegal? Do you think that should be illegal?
    Him I'd have to say quite possibly, yeah. I'd say that should be illegal.
    Me But a mobile phone - a digital phone . . . you'd say it'd be all right to tap that?
    Him I'm not sure about that. So we went from a point where anyone could listen in to anything. Like you, me, journalists could listen in to corrupt politicians, and this is why we have a reasonably fair society and a not particularly corrupt or criminal prime minister, whereas other countries have Gaddafi. Do you think it's right the only person with a decent digital scanner these days is the government? Whereas 20 years ago we all had a go? Are you comfortable that the only people who can listen in to you now are - is it MI5 or MI6?
    Me I'd rather no one listened in, to be honest. And I might not be alone there. You probably wouldn't want people listening to your conversations.
    Him I'm not interesting enough for anyone to want to listen in.
    Me Ah . . . I think that was one of the questions asked last week at one of the parliamentary committees. They asked Yates [John Yates, acting deputy commissioner of the Metropolitan Police] if it was true that he thought that the NoW had been hacking the phones of friends and family of those girls who were murdered . . . the Soham murder and the Milly girl [Milly Dowler].
    Him Yeah. Yeah. It's more than likely. Yeah . . . It was quite routine. Yeah - friends and family is something that's not as easy to justify as the other things.
    Me But celebrities you would justify because they're rich?
    Him Yeah. I mean, if you don't like it, you've just got to get off the stage. It'll do wonders.
    Me So I should have given up acting?
    Him If you live off your image, you can't really complain about someone . . .
    Me I live off my acting. Which is different to living off your image.
    Him Yeah, but you're still presenting yourself to the public. And if the public didn't know you -
    Me They don't give a shit. I got arrested with a hooker and they still came to my films. They don't give a fuck about your public image. They just care about whether you're in an entertaining film or not.
    Him That's true . . . I have terrible difficulty with him [points to pap shot of Johnny Depp]. He's really difficult. You know, I was in Venice and he was a nightmare to do because he walks around looking like Michael Jackson. And the punchline was . . . after leading everyone a merry dance the film was shot on an open balcony - I mean, it was like - he was standing there in public.
    Me And you don't see the difference between the two situations?
    Chum He was actually working at this time? As opposed to having his own private time?
    Him You can't hide all the time.
    Me So you're saying, if you're Johnny Depp or me, you don't deserve to have a private life?
    Him You make so much more money. You know, most people in Dover take home about 200 and struggle.
    Me So how much do you think the families of the Milly and Soham girls make?
    Him OK, so there are examples that are poor and you can't justify - and that's clearly one of them.
    Me I tell you the thing I still don't get - if you think it was all right to do all that stuff, why blow the whistle on it?
    Him Errm . . . Right. That's interesting. I actually blew the whistle when a friend of mine at the Guardian kept hassling me for an interview. I said, "Well if you put the name of the Castle [his pub] on the front page of the Guardian, I'll do anything you like." So that's how it started.
    Me So, have you been leant on by the NoW, News International, since you blew the whistle?
    Him No, they've kept their distance. I mean, there's people who have much better records - my records are non-existent. There are people who actually have tapes and transcripts they did for Andy Coulson.
    Me And where are these tapes and transcripts? Do you think they've been destroyed?
    Him No, I'm sure they're saving them till they retire.
    Me So did you personally ever listen to my voice messages?
    Him No, I didn't personally ever listen to your voice messages. I did quite a lot of stories on you, though. You were a very good earner at times.
    Those are the highlights. As I drove home past the white cliffs, I thought it was interesting - apart from the fact that Paul hates people like me, and I hate people like him, we got on quite well. And, absurdly, I felt a bit guilty for recording him.
    And he does have a very nice pub. The Castle Inn, Dover, for the record. There are rooms available, too. He asked me if I'd like to sample the honeymoon suite some time: "I can guarantee your privacy."
    New Statesman - The bugger, bugged


    I thought Steve Coogan was great too.
    [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nUjrIn6OzJA&feature=channel_video_title[/youtube]
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  14. #29
    Elite Member rollo's Avatar
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    There's more to come. Rebecca Wade (Brooks) allegedly had an affair with a politician, they gave free phones out to all and sundry which were then hacked and more!

    Rupert Murdoch is flying over from Australia.

  15. #30
    Elite Member ana-mish-ana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rollo View Post
    There's more to come. Rebecca Wade (Brooks) allegedly had an affair with a politician, they gave free phones out to all and sundry which were then hacked and more!

    Rupert Murdoch is flying over from Australia.

    OH WOW - where did you get this? I WOULD FUCKING DIE if it was allegedly David Cameron!!!! He was looking very shakey at the Press Conference.

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