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Thread: Love 'em or hate 'em: the Harry & Meghan megathread (Biddies v. Narcs edition)

  1. #721
    Elite Member aabbcc's Avatar
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    I wear my wedding ring above my engagement ring because the engagement ring is a bit loose and the wedding ring holds it in place. Kind of weird because they're a set and should fit the same, but they don't.
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  2. #722
    Elite Member SHELLEE's Avatar
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    I think nicki is right. Wedding ring closer to your heart.
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  3. #723
    Elite Member emkat's Avatar
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    Wedding ring goes under engagement ring.
    I saw DEATH, an anorexic penguin, an overcooked Gollum, Mr. Burns in need of a haircut and a methed-up Riff Raff.--Michael K. on Phil Spector

  4. #724
    Elite Member faithanne's Avatar
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    Most weddings I've been to, the bride wears her engagement ring on the right hand so the left hand is free for the wedding band, then after the ceremony the engagement ring goes on top of that.
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    "You're going to die tomorrow, Lord Bolton. Sleep well."



  5. #725
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    In eastern Europe the wedding band is worn on the right hand.
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  6. #726
    Elite Member o0Amber0o's Avatar
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    Until very recently (6 months or so) I always wore my band over my engagement ring, I thought since the wedding came after thats where you wore it.

    I learned about the closer to your heart thing while reading a post on Reddit, lol. So I switched.

  7. #727
    Elite Member Lofty Bike's Avatar
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    I don't even have an engagement ring....
    We just wanted some information about legal things to consider and the clerk just gave us a date. We let her and bought bands for the wedding. I was all "steel is enough" but ended up with Paladium and a little diamond set into it. Only ring I ever owned that costed more than 20 Euros. Not very fancy, but at 50, I felt more would be too much.
    Last edited by Lofty Bike; October 19th, 2020 at 02:57 PM.
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  8. #728
    Super Moderator twitchy2.0's Avatar
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    I'm usually using my hands for things that are not kind to rings, so I wear mine rarely. When I do, screw the 'rules.' I'll wear them however I want to.
    "But I am very poorly today & very stupid & I hate everybody & everything." -- Charles Darwin

  9. #729
    Elite Member Sleuth's Avatar
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    I was the same when I was married ^^ I even wore them on a necklace for awhile.
    Alicia Silverstone: "I think that the film Clueless was very deep. I think it was deep in the way that it was very light. I think lightness has to come from a very deep place if it's true lightness."

  10. #730
    Elite Member Sarzy's Avatar
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    The Duchess of Sussex, Meghan Markle, has revealed she had a miscarriage in July, writing in an article of feeling "an almost unbearable grief".

    "I knew, as I clutched my firstborn child, that I was losing my second," Meghan said in a piece for the New York Times.

    Meghan and Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex, had their first child, Archie, on 6 May 2019.

    Meghan wrote that "loss and pain have plagued every one of us in 2020".

    She said in a morning in July this year, she felt a "sharp cramp" and hours later, from a hospital bed, watched "my husband's heart break as he tried to hold the shattered pieces of mine".

    Meghan, 39, shared her experience to urge people to "commit to asking others, 'are you OK?'" over the Thanksgiving holiday in the US.

    The duke and duchess moved to California to live away from the media spotlight, after stepping back as senior royals in January.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-55068783
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  11. #731
    Elite Member levitt's Avatar
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    I like what she said about telling people so they felt they could share their experiences too. That’s why I told my friends I had a miscarriage, because I wanted them to know it was a safe space to share and to not feel alone if they had experienced or would ever experience it themselves.
    Ain't nothing wrong with Ohio wang! - MontanaMama

  12. #732
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Meghan, The Duchess
    of Sussex
    The Losses We Share
    Perhaps the path to healing
    begins with three simple words:
    Are you OK?


    It was a July morning that began as ordinarily as any other day: Make breakfast. Feed the dogs. Take vitamins. Find that missing sock. Pick up the rogue crayon that rolled under the table. Throw my hair in a ponytail before getting my son from his crib.

    After changing his diaper, I felt a sharp cramp. I dropped to the floor with him in my arms, humming a lullaby to keep us both calm, the cheerful tune a stark contrast to my sense that something was not right.

    I knew, as I clutched my firstborn child, that I was losing my second.

    Hours later, I lay in a hospital bed, holding my husband’s hand. I felt the clamminess of his palm and kissed his knuckles, wet from both our tears. Staring at the cold white walls, my eyes glazed over. I tried to imagine how we’d heal.

    I recalled a moment last year when Harry and I were finishing up a long tour in South Africa. I was exhausted. I was breastfeeding our infant son, and I was trying to keep a brave face in the very public eye.



    Are you OK?” a journalist asked me. I answered him honestly, not knowing that what I said would resonate with so many — new moms and older ones, and anyone who had, in their own way, been silently suffering. My off-the-cuff reply seemed to give people permission to speak their truth. But it wasn’t responding honestly that helped me most, it was the question itself.

    “Thank you for asking,” I said. “Not many people have asked if I’m OK.”

    Sitting in a hospital bed, watching my husband’s heart break as he tried to hold the shattered pieces of mine, I realized that the only way to begin to heal is to first ask, “Are you OK?”



    Are we? This year has brought so many of us to our breaking points. Loss and pain have plagued every one of us in 2020, in moments both fraught and debilitating. We’ve heard all the stories: A woman starts her day, as normal as any other, but then receives a call that she’s lost her elderly mother to Covid-19. A man wakes feeling fine, maybe a little sluggish, but nothing out of the ordinary. He tests positive for the coronavirus and within weeks, he — like hundreds of thousands of others — has died.

    A young woman named Breonna Taylor goes to sleep, just as she’s done every night before, but she doesn’t live to see the morning because a police raid turns horribly wrong. George Floyd leaves a convenience store, not realizing he will take his last breath under the weight of someone’s knee, and in his final moments, calls out for his mom. Peaceful protests become violent. Health rapidly shifts to sickness. In places where there was once community, there is now division.

    On top of all of this, it seems we no longer agree on what is true. We aren’t just fighting over our opinions of facts; we are polarized over whether the fact is, in fact, a fact. We are at odds over whether science is real. We are at odds over whether an election has been won or lost. We are at odds over the value of compromise.

    That polarization, coupled with the social isolation required to fight this pandemic, has left us feeling more alone than ever.

    When I was in my late teens, I sat in the back of a taxi zipping through the busyness and bustle of Manhattan. I looked out the window and saw a woman on her phone in a flood of tears. She was standing on the sidewalk, living out a private moment very publicly. At the time, the city was new to me, and I asked the driver if we should stop to see if the woman needed help.

    He explained that New Yorkers live out their personal lives in public spaces. “We love in the city, we cry in the street, our emotions and stories there for anybody to see,” I remember him telling me. “Don’t worry, somebody on that corner will ask her if she’s OK.”


    Now, all these years later, in isolation and lockdown, grieving the loss of a child, the loss of my country’s shared belief in what’s true, I think of that woman in New York. What if no one stopped? What if no one saw her suffering? What if no one helped?

    I wish I could go back and ask my cabdriver to pull over. This, I realize, is the danger of siloed living — where moments sad, scary or sacrosanct are all lived out alone. There is no one stopping to ask, “Are you OK?”

    Losing a child means carrying an almost unbearable grief, experienced by many but talked about by few. In the pain of our loss, my husband and I discovered that in a room of 100 women, 10 to 20 of them will have suffered from miscarriage. Yet despite the staggering commonality of this pain, the conversation remains taboo, riddled with (unwarranted) shame, and perpetuating a cycle of solitary mourning.

    Some have bravely shared their stories; they have opened the door, knowing that when one person speaks truth, it gives license for all of us to do the same. We have learned that when people ask how any of us are doing, and when they really listen to the answer, with an open heart and mind, the load of grief often becomes lighter — for all of us. In being invited to share our pain, together we take the first steps toward healing.


    So this Thanksgiving, as we plan for a holiday unlike any before — many of us separated from our loved ones, alone, sick, scared, divided and perhaps struggling to find something, anything, to be grateful for — let us commit to asking others, “Are you OK?” As much as we may disagree, as physically distanced as we may be, the truth is that we are more connected than ever because of all we have individually and collectively endured this year.

    We are adjusting to a new normal where faces are concealed by masks, but it’s forcing us to look into one another’s eyes — sometimes filled with warmth, other times with tears. For the first time, in a long time, as human beings, we are really seeing one another.

    Are we OK?

    We will be.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/25/o...scarriage.html

  13. #733
    Elite Member Lofty Bike's Avatar
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    That's very sad.

  14. #734
    Elite Member palta's Avatar
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    i always like to ask 'how are you?' instead of 'are you ok?' because i don't want to imply that i'm looking for an affirmative answer with that question.
    i try to give the other part the opportunity to talk about how are they feeling and show that i care, i don't like for them to feel that they have to ease my mind with a 'yes'.

    sorry if that sounds silly. maybe is different in another language?
    SHELLEE, twitchy2.0, fgg and 9 others like this.

  15. #735
    Elite Member SHELLEE's Avatar
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    ^I understand what you are saying and agree with you.
    fgg, aggie and palta like this.
    See, Whores, we are good for something. Love, Florida
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